Anthill: A Novel

Anthill: A Novel

3.2 47
by Edward O. Wilson
     
 

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The two-time Pulitzer Prize–winning biologist delivers “an astonishing literary achievement” (Anthony Gottlieb, The Economist).

Winner of the 2010 Heartland Prize, Anthill follows the thrilling adventures of a modern-day Huck Finn, enthralled with the “strange, beautiful, and elegant” world of his native Nokobee

Overview

The two-time Pulitzer Prize–winning biologist delivers “an astonishing literary achievement” (Anthony Gottlieb, The Economist).

Winner of the 2010 Heartland Prize, Anthill follows the thrilling adventures of a modern-day Huck Finn, enthralled with the “strange, beautiful, and elegant” world of his native Nokobee County. But as developers begin to threaten the endangered marshlands around which he lives, the book’s hero decides to take decisive action. Edward O. Wilson—the world’s greatest living biologist—elegantly balances glimpses of science with the gripping saga of a boy determined to save the world from its most savage ecological predator: man himself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393063202
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
04/11/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
409,560
File size:
968 KB

Meet the Author

Edward O. Wilson is widely recognized as one of the world's preeminent biologists and naturalists. The author of more than twenty books, including The Creation, The Social Conquest of Earth, The Meaning of Human Existence, and Letters to a Young Scientist, Wilson is a professor emeritus at Harvard University. The winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, he lives in Lexington, Massachusetts.

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Anthill 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 46 reviews.
Purrmoon More than 1 year ago
Raff is a highly observant child growing up in poor rural Alabama. He spends a lot of time exploring a nearby swamp, observing and learning the local flora and fauna. He is fascinated by the anthills in one area of the swamp. As he grows up it becomes clear that Nokobee swamp seems destined to fall to developers and Raff feels the need to do something to save it. He becomes friends with local people( a naturalist, a journalist and a wealthy uncle) who can help him position himself to protect the swamp. The book follows his progress through high school, college and ultimately through Harvard Law School as he gains the knowledge and skills he will ultimately use in his effort to protect Nokobee. I learned more about ants from this book than from the sum of my prior reading. Raff skillfully uses his knowledge of ants to gain the support he needs to get a good education. The parallels between ant wars and people wars are not lost on the reader. Raff's character is well developed and the writing style is fluid as the slow currents of the swamp itself. The pace of the action accelerates toward the end of the book, as Raff is confronted by small minded people unappreciative of his efforts. Forced to run for his life he finds unexpected support deep in the swamp. What goes around comes around in surprising twists of fortune. A good read and characters you will not forget.
CamSea More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the book thoroushly. Would recommend it highly.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting story on a number of levels, wether as a light read or as mataphor for civilization.
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bookhound_77 More than 1 year ago
I have to admit I was first drawn to this book by its cover. It reminded me a bit of a throwback to Huckleberry Finn. What I discovered was a completely new and original tale of life in the deep south. While the book's narrative encompasses three worlds, each one is both engaging and entertaining. I would have liked to read more about the young Raph as he discovers life on his own terms (I felt Wilson had him advance into adulthood to quickly). The narrative about the lives of the ant colonies was very interesting. A Watership Down on the insect level if you will. Overall I would HIGHLY recommend this book. I purchased it as an eBook, however the beautiful cover art would look fabulous on my coffee table.
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