Anthology of American Literature Volume II / Edition 9

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Overview

For nearly three decades, students and instructors have complemented their introductory American Literature studies with George McMichael’s Anthology of American Literature 8e. Carefully selected works introduce readers to America's literary heritage, from the colonial period of William Bradford and Anne Bradstreet to the contemporary era of Saul Bellow and Toni Morrison.

In this eighth edition, the table of contents will continue to include classic canonical works and new canonical works chosen for their literary value. These texts represent the best available scholarly texts and include as many complete works as possible.

In addition to varied and time-tested selections, an expanded chronological chart and interactive timeline help readers associate literary works with historical, political, technological, and cultural developments.

[Insert CW Logo] www.prenhall.com/mcmichael FREE updated Companion Website™ includes quizzes for text selections, author links, an interactive timeline, and additional American literature resources.

(Insert Penguin icon) Pick a Penguin Program*

We offer select Penguin Putnam titles at a substantial discount to your students when you request a special package of one or more Penguin titles with this text. Among the many American Literature titles available from Penguin Putnam are:

· Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage

· John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

· Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

· Paul Auster, Leviathan

· August Wilson, The Piano Lesson

· Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun

· Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire

· Ken Kesey, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132216470
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/3/2007
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 9
  • Pages: 2464
  • Product dimensions: 6.18 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 2.03 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface

About the Editors

The Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century

[NEW] Reading the Historical Context

[NEW] MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)

FROM Life on the Mississippi

[Sir Walter Scott and the Southern Character]

[NEW] ALBION TOURGÉE (1838-1905)

FROM The Invisible Empire

[NEW] Reading the Critical Context

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (1837-1920)

FROM Criticism and Fiction

[The Ideal Grasshopper]

[American Fiction]

HENRY JAMES (1843-1916)

The Art of Fiction

[NEW] MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)

Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offences

The Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century

WALT WHITMAN (1819—1892)

Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass

Song of Myself

FROM Inscriptions

To You

One’s-Self I Sing

When I read the book

I Hear America Singing

Poets to Come

FROM Children of Adam

From pent-up aching rivers

Out of the rolling ocean the crowd

As Adam, Early in the Morning

Once I pass’d through a populous city

Facing west from California’s shores

FROM Calamus

In paths untrodden

Scented herbage of my breast

What Think You I take My Pen In Hand?

I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing

I hear it was charged against me

Crossing Brooklyn Ferry

FROM Sea-Drift

Out of the cradle endlessly rocking

As I ebb’d with the ocean of life

FROM By the Roadside

When I heard the learn’d astronomer

The Dalliance of the Eagles

FROM Drum-Taps

Beat! Beat! Drums!

Cavalry Crossing a Ford

Bivouac on a Mountain Side

Vigil strange I kept on the field one night

A march in the ranks hard-prest, and the road unknown

A sight in camp in the daybreak gray and dim

The Wound-Dresser

FROM Memories of President Lincoln

When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom’d

FROM Autumn Rivulets

There was a child went forth

Sparkles from the Wheel

Who Learns My Lesson Complete?

Passage to India

The Sleepers

From Whispers of Heavenly Death

A noiseless patient spider

FROM Noon to Starry Night

To a Locomotive in Winter

FROM Democratic Vistas

EMILY DICKINSON (1830—1886)

49 I never lost as much but twice

67 Success is counted sweetest

125 For each ecstatic instant

130 These are the days when Birds come back

165 A Wounded Deer – leaps highest

185 “Faith” is a fine invention

210 The thought beneath so slight a film

214 I taste a liquor never brewed

216 Safe in their Alabaster Chambers

241 I like a look of Agony

249 Wild Nights–Wild Nights!

258 There’s a certain Slant of light

280 I felt a Funeral, in my Brain

287 A Clock stopped

303 The Soul selects her own Society

324 Some keep the Sabbath going to Church

328 A Bird came down the Walk

338 I know that He exists

341 After great pain, a formal feeling comes

401 What Soft–Cherubic Creatures

414 ’Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch

435 Much Madness is divinest Sense

441 This is my letter to the World

448 This was a Poet–It is That

449 I died for Beauty–but was scarce

465 I heard a Fly buzz–when I died

510 It was not Death, for I stood up

520 I started Early–Took my Dog

585 I like to see it lap the Miles

613 They shut me up in Prose

632 The Brain–is wider than the sky

640 I cannot live with You

650 Pain–has an Element of Blank

657 I dwell in Possibility

670 One need not be a Chamber–to be Haunted

709 Publication–is the Auction

712 Because I could not stop for Death

732 She rose to His Requirement–dropt

745 Renunciation–is a piercing Virtue

754 My life had stood–a Loaded Gun

764 Presentiment–is that long Shadow–on the Lawn

976 Death is a Dialogue between

986 A narrow Fellow in the Grass

1052 I never saw a Moor

1078 The Bustle in a House

1129 Tell all the truth but tell it slant

1207 He preached upon “Breadth” till it argued him narrow

1463 A Route of Evanescence

1545 The Bible is an antique Volume

1624 Apparently with no surprise

1670 In Winter in my Room

1732 My life closed twice before its close

1755 To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee

1760 Elysium is as far as to

Letters to T. W. Higginson

MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)

The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County

[NEW] Story of the Bad Little Boy

[NEW] Disgraceful Persecution of a Boy

[NEW] FROM Goldsmith’s Friend Abroad Again

[NEW] Sociable Jimmy

[NEW] A True Story

FROM Old Times on the Mississippi

[A Boy Wants to Be a Pilot]

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

[NEW] My First Lie, and How I Got Out of It

[NEW] To the Person Sitting in Darkness

[NEW] The War Prayer

MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN (1852-1930)

A New England Nun

[NEW] A Mistaken Charity

SARAH ORNE JEWETT (1849-1909)

A White Heron

[NEW] The Town Poor

BRET HARTE (1836-1902)

Tennessee’s Partner

GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE (1844-1925)

Belles Demoiselles Plantation

CHARLES WADDELL CHESNUTT (1858-1932)

The Goophered Grapevine

[NEW] The Wife of His Youth

[NEW] A Metropolitan Experience

JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS (1848-1908)

How Mr. Rabbit Was Too Sharp for Mr. Fox 287

Free Joe and the Rest of the World

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (1837-1920)

Editha

HENRY JAMES (1843-1916)

Daisy Miller: A Study

The Real Thing

The Beast in the Jungle

AMBROSE BIERCE (1842-1914)

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

[NEW] Chickamauga

CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN (1860-1935)

The Yellow Wall-Paper

[NEW] If I Were a Man

[NEW] The Unnatural Mother

KATE CHOPIN (1851-1904)

The Awakening

[NEW] The Storm

STEPHEN CRANE (1871-1900)

Black riders came from the sea

In the desert

A god in wrath

I saw a man pursuing the horizon

Supposing that I should have the courage

On the horizon the peaks assembled

A man feared that he might find an assassin

Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind

A man said to the universe

A man adrift on a slim spar

[NEW] The Blue Hotel

The Open Boat

FRANK NORRIS (1870-1902)

A Deal in Wheat

JACK LONDON (1876-1916)

The Law of Life

[NEW] To Build a Fire

[NEW] ANNA JULIA COOPER

Has America a Race Problem...?

FROM A Voice from the South

ABRAHAM CAHAN

The Imported Bridegroom

EDITH WHARTON (1862-1937)

The Other Two

[NEW] PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR (1871-1906)

The Ingrate

We Wear the Mask

An Ante-Bellum Sermon

When Malindy Sings

The Colored Soldiers

When Dey ‘Listed Colored Soldiers

Sympathy

The Race Question Discussed

The Fourth of July and Race Outrages

THEODORE DREISER (1871-1945)

Free

[NEW] FROM Sister Carrie

The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900 To 1945)

[NEW] Reading the Historical Context

HENRY ADAMS (1838-1918)

FROM The Education of Henry Adams

The Dynamo and the Virgin

[NEW] Reading the Critical Context

T. S. ELIOT (1888-1965)

Tradition and the Individual Talent

The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900 To 1945)

[NEW] O. HENRY (WILLIAM SYDNEY PORTER) (1862-1910)

A Municipal Report

[NEW] OWEN WISTER (1860-1938)

FROM The Virginian

[NEW] JAMES WELDON JOHNSON (1871-1938)

Lift Every Voice and Sing

FROM Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

W. E. B. DU BOIS (1868-1963)

FROM The Souls of Black Folk

The Forethought

Of the Black Belt

Of the Passing of the First Born

The After-Thought

FROM The Crisis

[NEW] A Mild Suggestion

[NEW] On Being Crazy

[NEW] A Litany in Atlanta

[NEW] The Comet

EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON (1869-1935)

Luke Havergal

Zola

Richard Cory

Cliff Klingenhagen

Miniver Cheevy

How Annandale Went Out

Eros Turannos

Mr. Flood’s Party

ROBERT FROST (1874-1963)

Mending Wall

Home Burial

After Apple-Picking

The Road Not Taken

An Old Man’s Winter Night

Birches

The Oven Bird

For Once, Then, Something

Fire and Ice

Design

Nothing Gold Can Stay

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Acquainted with the Night

West-Running Brook

Desert Places

Neither out Far Nor in Deep

Directive

In Winter in the Woods Alone

[NEW] GERTRUDE SIMMONS BONNIN (ZITKALA SA) (1876-1938)

The School Days of an Indian Girl

[NEW] CARL SANDBURG (1878-1967)

Chicago

Lost

Graceland

Fog

Psalm of Those Who Go Forth Before Daylight

Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind

WILLA CATHER (1873-1947)

A Wagner Matinée

[NEW] Paul’s Case

ELLEN GLASGOW (1873-1945)

The Difference

GERTRUDE STEIN (1874-1946)

FROM Three Lives

The Gentle Lena

Susie Asado

Picasso

A Movie

[NEW] SHERWOOD ANDERSON (1876-1941)

FROM Winesburg, Ohio

The Book of the Grotesque

Hands

Mother

Tandy

JOHN DOS PASSOS (1896-1970)

FROM U.S.A.

Preface

FROM The 42nd Parallel

Proteus

FROM 1919

Newsreel XLIII

The Body of an American

FROM The Big Money

Newsreel LXVI

The Camera Eye (50)

Vag

EUGENE O’NEILL (1888-1953)

The Hairy Ape

SUSAN GLASPELL (1876-1948)

Trifles

[NEW] SINCLAIR LEWIS (1885-1951)

FROM Babbitt

EZRA POUND (1885-1972)

Portrait d'une Femme

Salutation

A Pact

In a Station of the Metro

The River-Merchants Wife: A Letter

FROM Hugh Selwyn Mauberley

I [E.P. Ode pour l’Election de son Sepulchre]

II [The age demanded an image]

III [The tea-rose tea-gown, etc.]

IV [These fought in any case]

V [There died a myriad]

FROM The Cantos

I [And then went down to the ship]

II [Hang it all, Robert Browning]

XLV [With Usura]

LXXXI [What thou lovest well remains]

A Retrospect

T. S. ELIOT (1888-1965)

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Preludes

Gerontion

The Waste Land

Notes on The Waste Land

Journey of the Magi

E. E. CUMMINGS (1894-1962)

[in Just-]

[O sweet spontaneous]

[Buffalo Bills defunct]

[the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls]

[“next to of course god america I”]

[my sweet old etcetera]

[somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond]

[r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r]

[anyone lived in a pretty how town]

[pity this busy monster,manunkind]

[when serpents bargain for the right to squirm]

[1(a]

HART CRANE (1899-1932)

Chaplinesque

At Melville’s Tomb

Voyages

FROM The Bridge

To Brooklyn Bridge

Powhatan’s Daughter

The Harbor Dawn

Van Winkle

The River

The Tunnel

Atlantis

[NEW] EDGAR LEE MASTERS (1868-1950)

FROM Spoon River Anthology

Knowlt Hoheimer

Nellie Clark

Petit, the Poet

Anne Rutledge

Lucinda Matlock

[NEW] ANZIA YEZIERSKA (1880-1970)

The Fat of the Land

[NEW] EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY (1892-1950)

Spring

First Fig

[I shall forget you presently, my dear]

[Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare]

WALLACE STEVENS (1879-1955)

Peter Quince at the Clavier

Disillusionment of Ten O’Clock

Sunday Morning

Domination of Black

The Death of a Soldier

Anecdote of the Jar

A High-Toned Old Christian Woman

The Emperor of Ice-Cream

The Idea of Order at Key West

Of Modern Poetry

Final Soliloquy of the Interior Paramour

The Plain Sense of Things

Of Mere Being

WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS (1883-1963)

Con Brio

The Young Housewife

Pastoral

Tract

Danse Russe

Queen-Anne’s-Lace

Spring and All

To Elsie

The Red Wheelbarrow

At the Ball Game

Between Walls

This Is Just to Say

The Yachts

These

Seafarer

Landscape with the Fall of Icarus

ROBINSON JEFFERS (1887-1962)

Boats in a Fog

Hurt Hawks

Shine, Perishing Republic

MARIANNE MOORE (1887-1972)

To a Steam Roller

The Fish

Poetry

No Swan So Fine

The Mind Is an Enchanting Thing

In Distrust of Merits

[NEW] THE NEW NEGRO (1925)

Foreword, by Alain Locke

Vestiges, by Rudolph Fisher

Fog, by John Matheus

Fern, by Jean Toomer

Spunk, by Zora Neale Hurston

Harlem Wine, by Countee Cullen

White Houses, by Claude McKay

I Too, by Langston Hughes

The Black Finger, by Angelina Grimke

The Road, by Helene Johnson

COUNTE CULLEN (1903-1946)

Yet Do I Marvel

For a Lady I Know

Incident

From the Dark Tower

A Brown Girl Dead

Heritage

Scottsboro, Too, Is Worth Its Song

JEAN TOOMER (1894-1967)

FROM Cane

Blood-Burning Moon

Cotton Song

Carma

Song of the Son

ZORA NEALE HURSTON (1891-1960)

[NEW] How It Feels to be Colored Me

The Gilded Six-Bits

THOMAS WOLFE (1900-1938)

Only the Dead Know Brooklyn

The Far and the Near

F. SCOTT FITZGERALD (1896-1940)

[NEW] Bernice Bobs Her Hair

Winter Dreams

ERNEST HEMINGWAY (1899-1961)

Big Two-Hearted River

WILLIAM FAULKNER (1897-1962)

That Evening Sun

[NEW] Intruder in the Dust

LANGSTON HUGHES (1902-1967)

The Negro Speaks of Rivers

The Weary Blues

Young Gal’s Blues

Note on Commercial Theatre

Dream Boogie

Harlem

Theme for English B

On the Road

JOHN STEINBECK (1902-1968)

[NEW] FROM The Long Valley

The Snake

The Vigilante

KATHERINE ANNE PORTER (1890-1980)

Flowering Judas

The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1945 to Present)

[NEW] Reading the Historical Context

[NEW] MARTIN LUTHER KING (1929-1968)

I Have a Dream

[NEW] TIM O’BRIEN (1946—)

FROM The Things They Carried

On the Rainy River

[NEW] DINÉ BAHANE’: THE NAVAJO CREATION STORY

[The Quarrel Between First Man and First Woman]

Reading the Critical Context

The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1945 to Present)

EUDORA WELTY (1909-2001)

[NEW] Powerhouse

RICHARD WRIGHT (1908-1960)

[NEW] FROM Native Son


RALPH ELLISON (1914-1994)

FROM Invisible Man

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS (1911-1983)

The Glass Menagerie

THEODORE ROETHKE (1908-1963)

Dolor

Open House

Cuttings

Cuttings (Later)

Root Cellar

My Papas Waltz

In a Dark Time

RANDALL JARRELL (1914-1965)

Losses

The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner

A Girl in the Library

In Montecito

ELIZABETH BISHOP (1911-1979)

A Miracle for Breakfast

The Fish

Over 2,000 Illustrations and a Complete Concordance

Visits to St. Elizabeths

Sestina

The Armadillo

Brazil, January 1, 1502

In the Waiting Room

One Art

ROBERT LOWELL (1917-1977)

The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket

Mr. Edwards and the Spider

Memories of West Street and Lepke

Skunk Hour

For the Union Dead

Waking Early Sunday Morning

Will Not Come Back

[NEW] ANN PETRY (1908-1997)

Solo on the Drums

RICHARD WILBUR (1921—)

Marginalia

Lamarck Elaborated

A Hole in the Floor

Trolling for Blues

[NEW] SHIRLEY JACKSON (1916-1965)

The Lottery

[NEW] JOSEPH HELLER (1923-1999)

FROM Catch-22

Major Major Major Major

NORMAN MAILER (1923—)

FROM The Armies of the Night

ALLEN GINSBERG (1926-1997)

Howl

[NEW]Footnote to Howl

A Supermarket in California

America

To Aunt Rose

GARY SNYDER (1930—)

Riprap

[Translation of a Poem by Han-Shan]

Poem Left in Sourdough Mountain Lookout

I Went into the Maverick Bar

Soy Sauce

ADRIENNE RICH (1929—)

At a Bach Concert

Living in Sin

Breakfast in a Bowling Alley in Utica, New York

Divisions of Labor

For This

1999

DENISE LEVERTOV (1923-1997)

Beyond the End

Pure Products

Come into Animal Presence

The Ache of Marriage

O Taste and See

Abel’s Bride

Mad Song

A Hunger

Zeroing in

ANNE SEXTON (1928-1974)

The Farmer’s Wife

Ringing the Bells

And One for My Dame

The Addict

Us

Rowing

SYLVIA PLATH (1932-1963)

The Bee Meeting

Lady Lazarus

Ariel

Daddy

Fever 103Ú

JAMES DICKEY (1923-1997)

The Lifeguard

Reincarnation (I)

In the Mountain Tent

The Shark’s Parlor

W. S. MERWIN (1927—)

Grandfather in the Old Men’s Home

The Drunk in the Furnace

Noah’s Raven

The Dry Stone Mason

Fly

Strawberries

Direction

A. R. AMMONS (1926-2001)

Sight Seed

Motion Which Disestablishes Organizes Everything

The Damned

JAMES BALDWIN (1924-1987)

Sonny’s Blues

FLANNERY OCONNOR (1925-1964)

A Good Man Is Hard to Find

JOHN UPDIKE (1932—)

[NEW] A & P

PHILIP ROTH (1933—)

The Conversion of the Jews

BERNARD MALAMUD (1914-1986)

The Magic Barrel

TILLIE OLSEN (1913—)

I Stand Here Ironing

TOMÁS RIVERA (1935-1984)

. . . And the Earth Did Not Part

AMIRI BARAKA (LEROI JONES) (1934-)

In Memory of Radio

The Bridge

Notes for a Speech

An Agony, As Now

A Poem for Democrats

A Poem for Speculative Hipsters

A Poem Some People Will Have to Understand

A Poem for Half-White College Students

Biography

SONIA SANCHEZ (1934—)

the final solution/

to blk/record/buyers

Womanhood

Masks

Just Don’t Never Give Up on Love

[NEW] BLACK FIRE (1968)

Poem, by James T. Stewart

Neon Diaspora, by David Henderson

when my uncle willie saw, by Carol Freeman

For the Truth, Because It's Necessary, by Edward Spriggs

“Oh shit a riot!” by Jacques Wakefield

RITA DOVE (1952-)

Kentucky, 1833

Adolescence — I

Adolescence — II

Adolescence — III

Banneker

Jiving

The Zeppelin Factory

Under the Viaduct, 1932

Roast Possum

Weathering Out

Daystar

MAXINE HONG KINGSTON (1940—)

No Name Woman

EDWARD ALBEE (1928—)

The Zoo Story

SAUL BELLOW (1915—)

A Silver Dish

KURT VONNEGUT (1922—)

Welcome to the Monkey House

WILLIAM STYRON (1925—)

FROM The Confessions of Nat Turner

N. SCOTT MOMADAY (1934—)

FROM The Way to Rainy Mountain

The Arrowmaker

THOMAS PYNCHON (1937—)

Entropy

JAMES WELCH (1940-2003)

FROM The Death of Jim Loney

JOYCE CAROL OATES (1938—)

How I Contemplated the World from the Detroit House of

Correction and Began My Life over Again

JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON (1943---)

The Faithful

ALICE WALKER (1944—)

Everyday Use

[NEW]Burial

AMY TAN (1952—)

FROM The Joy Luck Club

Half and Half

BOBBIE ANN MASON (1940—)

Shiloh

[NEW] DAVID BRADLEY (1950—)

FROM The Chaneysville Incident

197903042100 (Sunday)

GLORIA NAYLOR (1950—)

FROM The Women of Brewster Place

Lucielia Louise Turner

LESLIE MARMON SILKO (1948—)

The Man to Send Rain Clouds

Coyote Holds a Full House in His Hand

RAYMOND CARVER (1938-1988)

Cathedral

DON DELILLO (1936—)

FROM White Noise

[NEW] GLORIA ANZALDÚA (1942-2004)

FROM Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza

The Homeland, Aztlán / El otro México

JAMAICA KINCAID (1949—)

Girl

Wingless

LOUISE ERDRICH (1954—)

FROM Love Medicine

The Red Convertible

TINA HOWE (1937---)

Painting Churches

FREDERICK BUSCH (1941-2006)

Bring Your Friends to the Zoo

BILLY COLLINS (1941—)

Winter Syntax

Books

Introduction to Poetry

SIMON ORTIZ (1941—)

A Designated National Park

Canyon de Chelly

Final Solution: Jobs, Leaving

SHERMAN ALEXIE (1966—)

What you Pawn I Will Redeem

Defending Walt Whitman

Reference Works, Bibliographies

Criticism, Literary and Cultural History

Acknowledgements

Index to Authors, Titles, and First Lines

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    Barnes & Nobles lost it in the mail, so I never got it.

    The headline says it all, "Barnes & Nobles lost it in the mail, so I never got it." I bought the book from B&N because it was cheaper. After waiting for a while, I kept calling B&N and they had no idea where the book was. I eventually received a refund, but I had to go buy the book from somewhere else.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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