Anthony and the Girls
  • Anthony and the Girls
  • Anthony and the Girls
  • Anthony and the Girls
  • Anthony and the Girls
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Anthony and the Girls

by Ole Konnecke
     
 

Anthony has a bucket, a shovel, and a really big car. But the girls playing in the sandbox don't look. They don't even look when attention-seeking Anthony does his best trick. Is there nothing he can do to turn their heads his way?

In dazzlingly deadpan text and art, Ole Könnecke hilariously demonstrates how easy it is to stumble when trying too hard to make

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Overview

Anthony has a bucket, a shovel, and a really big car. But the girls playing in the sandbox don't look. They don't even look when attention-seeking Anthony does his best trick. Is there nothing he can do to turn their heads his way?

In dazzlingly deadpan text and art, Ole Könnecke hilariously demonstrates how easy it is to stumble when trying too hard to make a splash. After all, as parents know and children will learn, it's not about what you've got but about how much heart.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Packs a lot into its pages. Tongue-in-cheek captions will entertain adults as much as children." —Starred, Publishers Weekly

"A wry episode in social interaction." — Kirkus Reviews

"Young playground habitués will appreciate the gently humorous treatment of the important subject of playground dynamics." —Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Winsome." —Booklist

Children's Literature
At the beginning of the story, a smiling Anthony appears with a bucket, a shovel, and a "really big car." Despite his toys and winning ways, the two girls building castles in a nearby sandbox totally ignore him. Although he jumps high, lifts a branch, and slides headfirst down the slide with his eyes closed, the girls still are not interested. Then Anthony gets mad. He builds the biggest house in the world, which promptly falls down. When the little boy cries, the girls come to his rescue with a cookie. This small story, with cartoon-like illustrations and lots of white space, has a certain appeal in its simplicity and sweetness. However, the turn of events that bring another playmate into the picture—Luke with his bigger and better toys—may be lost on the youngest readers. Translated from the German by Nancy Seitz, this book will be helpful for presenting different social situations to children and offering them up for discussion. Although Anthony's tearful reaction to the girls' indifference may draw some youngsters to the characters, others know it is not the best solution to forming friendships in the sandbox. 2006, Farrar Straus and Giroux, Ages 3 to 6.
—Augusta Scattergood
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Anthony desperately wants to play with two girls in a sandbox, but they are quite happy without him. In fact, they don't even notice him despite his numerous attempts to attract their attention with his hat, his car, and his shovel. It is not until he falls down and starts to cry that they are aware of his existence. They invite him into the sandbox, and Anthony is finally a happy chappy-until the arrival of Luke. This book reinforces the thoroughly negative maxim that tears reap rewards. K nnecke's spare illustrations are reminiscent of early Peanuts cartoons; in fact the book could have easily been condensed into a comic strip. The dead-pan text builds genuine dramatic tension with each turn of the page and each attempt by Anthony to attract the girls. To see it end, literally, in tears, is a letdown, and readers are sure to expect more from the cool, resourceful Anthony. If crying is the best that he can do, he has no chance against Luke, who will most likely evict him from the play box with his bigger car, bigger hat, and bigger shovel.-Kara Schaff Dean, Needham Public Library, MA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Originally published in Germany, a wry episode in social interaction is conveyed in deceptively simple art and text. A smiling lad swaggers up to a sandbox in which two girls are playing. "Here comes Anthony. Anthony is cool." But despite having a bucket, a shovel and a "really big car," Anthony can't get the girls to give him a glance. Nor does daredevil behavior (going down the slide head first), or building "the biggest house in the world" from a chair and other found materials gain notice. The house falls down, and Anthony starts to cry-that earns both a cookie and an invitation into the sandbox. But then along comes Luke, and he has even cooler toys. Illustrated with round-headed, Charlie Brown-style figures over a scant handful of words per page, this is nonetheless likely to have more meaning for readers who recognize its metaphorical level. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374303761
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
02/21/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.75(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.31(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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