Sophocles: Antigone

Sophocles: Antigone

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by Sophocles
     
 

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Sophocles' Antigone is among the greatest and most famous of all works of Greek literature, and it is often the play that is read first, whether in Greek or in translation, by those who are beginning to study Greek tragedy. But it is by no means an easy play, and the reader requires careful guidance if he is to appreciate its subtleties and come to grips with its

Overview

Sophocles' Antigone is among the greatest and most famous of all works of Greek literature, and it is often the play that is read first, whether in Greek or in translation, by those who are beginning to study Greek tragedy. But it is by no means an easy play, and the reader requires careful guidance if he is to appreciate its subtleties and come to grips with its problems. In this edition the introduction includes an account of the myth, a brief survey of the main interpretative issues, and a bibliography. The text is newly constituted in the light of the latest scholarly research, with an abbreviated critical apparatus. The facing translation stays as close to the Greek wording as English idiom allows, one of its purposes being to show how the Greek is to be construed. The commentary is designed to elucidate the play, not to discuss points of grammar or philology, though the reader is alerted to all serious textual uncertainties. While full account is taken of recent developments in scholarship and literary criticism, the needs of the complete beginner are constantly borne in mind, and almost all the notes are accessible to readers with no Greek at all. Copious references are provided to places where further discussion can be found. Text with facing translation, commentary and notes.

Editorial Reviews

Joseph Russo
A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version.
Library Journal
These two new additions to Oxford's "Greek Tragedy in New Translations" series only add to the luster of the previous releases. Each is firmly packed with insightful introductions, comprehensive and numbered notes, glossaries, and up-to-date bibliographies (the plays' texts take up about half of each volume). The collaboration of poet and scholar in each volume produces a language that is easy to read and easy to speak (compare, for instance, the Watchman's first lines in Shapiro and Burian's Agamemnon with those in Lattimore's 1947 translation). Each volume's introduction presents the play's action and themes with some detail. The translators' notes describe the linguistic twists and turns involved in rendering the text into a modern poetic language. Both volumes are enthusiastically recommended for academic libraries, theater groups, and theater departments.-Larry Schwartz, Minnesota State Univ., Moorhead Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
'Griffith … it would be fairer to describe him as thorough, undogmatic, and open-minded. He is in most respects the ideal commentator, and this book will be of permanent value to scholars and students at all levels.' Hermathena

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780856682667
Publisher:
Aris and Phillips
Publication date:
12/01/1991
Series:
Classical Texts Ser.
Edition description:
GREEK
Pages:
240

Meet the Author

Richard Clavarhouse Jebb, Regius Professor of Greek and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, was one of the foremost classicists of the Victorian era. His editions of Sophocles' plays appeared in the last fifteen years of the 19th century. They are distinguished by the sensitivity of Jebb's literary and dramatic interpretations, and the neat translation facing the Greek text. They have had a profound influence on subsequent Sophoclean scholarship. P.E. Easterling, editor of this series and author of the new Foreword to each volume, is Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Newnham College. She is general editor of the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics series. Ruby Blondell, who provides the new Introduction to this volume, is Professor of Classics in the University of Washington, Seattle. She has published widely on Greek tragedy and translated Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone (under the name Mary Whitlock Blundell) and King Oedipus (1990, 1998 and forthcoming).

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Antigone (Greek Tragedy in New Translations Series) 2.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cant open it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The introduction and notes are in English and are mostly readable. But the body of the play is in Greek and did not OCR at all. The result is pure gibberish.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The play's a must-read, but you'll find this copy illegible, as multiple previous, honest reviewers have noted. Beware of: 1. Poorly digitized copies, like this one, that are illegible. Shame on BN for letting this horrendous version should in the NOOK Store! 2. "Reviewers" who shill for whoever published this awful copy. 3. Reviewers of the story itself, who haven't bothered to even skim this copy. If they bothered, they'd warn you to find a better formatted (read: legible) copy elsewhere.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So many typos and errors that it is unreadable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was all sscrambled letters
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