Antigone

Antigone

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by Sophocles
     
 

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The third play in Sophocles' Oedipus Cycle. In Antigone, Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, argues for the moral right to bury her brothers who have died in a civil war they fought over who was to rule Thebes after the banishment of Oedipus. Their uncle, Creon, became the king of Thebes and opposed their burial. The conflict between Antigone andSee more details below

Overview

The third play in Sophocles' Oedipus Cycle. In Antigone, Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, argues for the moral right to bury her brothers who have died in a civil war they fought over who was to rule Thebes after the banishment of Oedipus. Their uncle, Creon, became the king of Thebes and opposed their burial. The conflict between Antigone and Creon on the right of law: earthly, embodied in the will of the sovereign, or heavenly, in the dictates of the gods; is the central theme of the play.

Editorial Reviews

Joseph Russo
A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version.
Library Journal
These two new additions to Oxford's "Greek Tragedy in New Translations" series only add to the luster of the previous releases. Each is firmly packed with insightful introductions, comprehensive and numbered notes, glossaries, and up-to-date bibliographies (the plays' texts take up about half of each volume). The collaboration of poet and scholar in each volume produces a language that is easy to read and easy to speak (compare, for instance, the Watchman's first lines in Shapiro and Burian's Agamemnon with those in Lattimore's 1947 translation). Each volume's introduction presents the play's action and themes with some detail. The translators' notes describe the linguistic twists and turns involved in rendering the text into a modern poetic language. Both volumes are enthusiastically recommended for academic libraries, theater groups, and theater departments.-Larry Schwartz, Minnesota State Univ., Moorhead Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher

A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version, and remarkably successful in making the choruses clear, lyrical, and yet part of the dramatic movement. Woodruff's rendering of the choruses especially impresses me by the way he manages to render complex syntax and imagery of the original--often tangled and occasionally obscure in its allusiveness--into clear and genuinely poetic English. --Joseph Russo, Haverford College

When a play has been translated as many times as the Antigone, a new version has to have some remarkable qualities in order to merit attention. Happily, Woodruff's Antigone has just that. Most notably, his text is performable: when read aloud it displays real pace and force. . . . Of course, performability is often gained at the expense of what we might call 'faithfulness' to the original text--and in practical terms, this means that a performance translation rarely serves well as a teaching text. Woodruff, then, has pulled off a remarkable feat in that this edition will serve the teacher and student of Sophocles as well as it would the actor. The original line numbers are preserved and the text is seldom distorted: Woodruff is aware that the words used by Sophocles matter, and employs footnotes to good effect to explain points of linguistic and cultural interest in a concise and accessible way. The flavour of Sophocles' play is also preserved by the stage directions, which are envisaged in terms of the ancient rather than the modern stage. The choral odes--which are translated with particular clarity--are also marked and divided into strophes and antistrophes. What also sets the translation apart is the quality of the introduction and appendices, which are both well informed and address the reader in a direct way. Woodruff succeeds in being straightforward but not patronizing and whilst his target audience is presumably a student of A-level or university level, this edition would be a good starting point for any intelligent adult who wished to read the play. Woodruff frames scholarly debates in such a way as to invite reaction from the reader and to encourage informed debate. Notable, too, is that he strives to keep the text 'open': as well as presenting different scholarly views on the play, he even provides 'Endnotes' where he provides information on readings of the manuscripts, thus providing access to debates from which the student is normally excluded. As part of this project--and refreshingly in my view--he makes his own presence felt: he informs us as to his own views on the play and spells out his objectives as a translator, thus opening up yet another aspect of investigation and debate. This is a provocative edition of the Antigone, which fulfills many of its high ambitions. For me, the vibrancy of Woodruff's approach to the play shines through, giving us a text just waiting to be read aloud, discussed and debated. --James Robson, The Joint Association of Classical Teachers Review

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781409949534
Publisher:
Dodo Press
Publication date:
04/17/2009
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,033,962
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
1 - 17 Years

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