Antigone: In a New Translation by Nicholas Rudall

Antigone: In a New Translation by Nicholas Rudall

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by Sophocles
     
 

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One of the greatest, most moving of all tragedies, Antigone continues to have meaning for us because of its depiction of the struggle between individual conscience and state policy, and its delicate probing of the nature of human suffering. Mr. Rudall's splendid translation brings a new power and speakability to Sophocles' prose.

Overview

One of the greatest, most moving of all tragedies, Antigone continues to have meaning for us because of its depiction of the struggle between individual conscience and state policy, and its delicate probing of the nature of human suffering. Mr. Rudall's splendid translation brings a new power and speakability to Sophocles' prose.

Editorial Reviews

Joseph Russo
A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version.
Library Journal
These two new additions to Oxford's "Greek Tragedy in New Translations" series only add to the luster of the previous releases. Each is firmly packed with insightful introductions, comprehensive and numbered notes, glossaries, and up-to-date bibliographies (the plays' texts take up about half of each volume). The collaboration of poet and scholar in each volume produces a language that is easy to read and easy to speak (compare, for instance, the Watchman's first lines in Shapiro and Burian's Agamemnon with those in Lattimore's 1947 translation). Each volume's introduction presents the play's action and themes with some detail. The translators' notes describe the linguistic twists and turns involved in rendering the text into a modern poetic language. Both volumes are enthusiastically recommended for academic libraries, theater groups, and theater departments.-Larry Schwartz, Minnesota State Univ., Moorhead Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781461600008
Publisher:
Dee, Ivan R. Publisher
Publication date:
10/01/1998
Series:
Plays for Performance Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
56
File size:
269 KB

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Meet the Author

The Plays for Performance series is edited by Nicholas Rudall, former artistic director of the Court Theatre at the University of Chicago where he is professor of classics, and Bernard Sahlins, founder and director of the Second City. They both live in Chicago, Illinois.

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Antigone 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had to read this play during the summer for an english class, and when I got it, I was suprised how short it was. The play is about a girl [Antigone--pronounced An-tig-oh-knee] that wants to giver her brother a burial that has been forbidden by the King, Creon. The play ends in tragedy, and is in ways similiar to Romeo and Juliet. This was a very good read that will only take you about a day to get through.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Recently, in my highschool, we staged the play Antigone... I'm a lover of Greek tragedy, so I was one happy chick, and tried out right away. I ended up with the part of Creon, although I'm a girl... I guess I auditioned better then I thought, beating out all the guys and landing the role of the protagonist... I found myself adoring this play and every aspect of it. Great action, it makes you think, and the characters are wonderful. I recomend Antigone for anyone in search of a good read! ;)