Antiquity and Photography: Early Views of Ancient Mediterranean Sites

Overview


Following the invention of the daguerreotype and calotype processes in 1839, views of ruins, classical statuary, and the antiquities of the Mediterranean and the Orient were among the first images produced by pioneer photographers. The unique accuracy and immediacy of photographs fundamentally changed aesthetic and scholarly approaches to the artifacts of the past.
This groundbreaking book explores the intellectual underpinnings of the relationship between antiquity and ...
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Overview


Following the invention of the daguerreotype and calotype processes in 1839, views of ruins, classical statuary, and the antiquities of the Mediterranean and the Orient were among the first images produced by pioneer photographers. The unique accuracy and immediacy of photographs fundamentally changed aesthetic and scholarly approaches to the artifacts of the past.
This groundbreaking book explores the intellectual underpinnings of the relationship between antiquity and photography in the period 1840-1880. Drawing on the extensive collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute, this richly illustrated volume presents an introduction to the subject, followed by a detailed discussion of the influence of photography on archaeology, an analysis of the ways antiquity is depicted, and biographical studies of two major photographers, Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey and William James Stillman. Portfolios of works by Maxime Du Camp, John B. Greene, Francis Frith, Robert Macpherson, Adolphe Braun, and others appear between the essays.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Early photography collections, especially those that document ethnicity and archaeological or historic sites, are increasingly featured in monographs and exhibitions. This erudite publication accompanies what promises to be an engaging show on display at the Getty Villa during the first half of 2006. Through historic photos and essays by scholars of archaeology and ancient art, it explores links between photography and archaeology in the Mediterranean between 1840 and 1880. French photographer Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey and American photographer William James Stillman are singled out for separate biographical studies. Portfolios of works by a dozen other photographers are sandwiched between the black-and-white and sometimes tinted or hand-colored Daguerreotypes; albumen, silver, carbon, and salted paper prints; and photolithographs of famous sites such as the Acropolis. The design is exquisite, the essays are illuminating, and the photos are unfailingly sharp. Highly recommended for art, archaeology, and classical research collections.-Russell T. Clement, Northwestern Univ. Lib., Evanston, IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Claire L. Lyons is collections curator at the Getty Research Institute; John K. Papadopoulos is professor of classics and archaeology at the University of California, Los Angeles; Lindsey S. Stewart is an independent photography consultant; and Andrew Szegedy-Maszak is professor of classical studies at Wesleyan University.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Introduction 2
The art and science of antiquity in nineteenth-century photography 22
In perfect order : antiquity in the daguerreotypes of Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey 66
Portfolio : plates I-VIII : Maxime Du Camp, Felix Teynard, John Beasley Greene, Gustave Le Gray, Francis Frith 94
Antiquity depicted 104
An American on the Acropolis : William James Stillman 148
Portfolio : plates IX-XVI : Robert Macpherson; Giorgio Sommer; Tommaso Cuccioni; Braun, Clement et Cie 196
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