Antony And Cleopatra

Antony And Cleopatra

3.8 21
by William Shakespeare
     
 

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Antony And Cleopatra
by William Shakespeare

"Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, originally printed in the First Folio of 1623.

The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony, follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's

Overview

Antony And Cleopatra
by William Shakespeare

"Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, originally printed in the First Folio of 1623.

The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony, follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumvirs and the future first emperor of Rome. The tragedy is a Roman play characterized by swift, panoramic shifts in geographical locations and in registers, alternating between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and the more pragmatic, austere Rome. Many consider the role of Cleopatra in this play one of the most complex female roles in Shakespeare's work. She is frequently vain and histrionic, provoking an audience almost to scorn; at the same time, Shakespeare's efforts invest both her and Antony with tragic grandeur. These contradictory features have led to famously divided critical responses."

Other Titles of William Shakespeare Books

1. Alls Well That Ends Well
2. As You Like It
3. Comedy of Errors
4. Coriolanus
5. Cymbeline
6. Hamlet
7. Julius Caeser
8. King Henry the Fourth Part I
9. King Henry the Eighth
10. King Henry the Fifth
11. King Henry the Fourth Part II
12. King Henry The Sixth Part I
13. King Henry The Sixth Part II
14. King Henry the Sixth Part III
15. King John
16. King Lear
17. King Richard the Second
18. King Richard the Third
19. Loves Labour Lost
20. Macbeth
21. A Lovers Complaint
22. Measure for Measure
23. Merchant of Venice
24. Merry Wives of Windsor
25. Midsummers' Night Dream
26. Much Ado About Nothing
27. Othello
28. Pericles Prince of Tyre
29. Rape of Lucrece
30. Romeo and Juliet
31. Sonnets
32. Taming of the Shrew
33. Tempest
34. The Winter's Tale
35. Timon of Athens
36. Titus Andronicus
37. Troilus and Cressida
38. Twelfth Night
39. Two Gentlemen of Verona
40. Two Noble Kinsmen
41. Venus and Adonis

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012018694
Publisher:
Apps Publisher
Publication date:
01/05/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
721 KB

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Antony and Cleopatra 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
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Conrad_Jalowski More than 1 year ago
The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare represents the pinnacle of tragic effect. Through its purpose as an ecphonesis, or an emotional exclamation that evokes pathos, instills catharsis within the audience and an epiphany that provokes the audience to intense oscillations of emotion in the phantasmagorical layout of this tragedy, dramatic effect and superiority is achieved.

English tragedy such as of Nathaniel Lee and William Shakespeare did not adhere closely to the dramatic theories of Aristotle, the theories of Lodovico Castelvetro of Renaissance theory and Neo-Classical theory of Moliere, Racine and Corneille. It did not adhere to the Three Unities, or the Unity of Time, the Unity of Space and the Unity of Action. Aristotle argued that the time should not succeed a twenty-four hour period whilst Lodovico Castelvetro argued that the tragedy should not succeed twelve hours; that the tragedy should take place at the same area of space and that it should have no subplots, or nothing that would impair the ability to adhere to the grand theme and essence of the tragedy; all aspects must serve the main theme of the tragedy. Along with the utilization of chorus, Aristotle, Lodovico Castelvetro, Friedrich Schiller, John Dryden, Racine, Moliere and Corneille all adhered to the "Classical Theme". Furthermore, William Shakespeare deviates from Aristotelian concepts through the concept of a contradictory plot that serves not to further the purpose of a single and grand theme but that of itself. Though containing a tragic hero is central to the tragedy as defined by Aristotle, such is shifted in a future date by the Hegelian World-Historical Individual although it too has its roots to the Aristotelian tragic hero. First and foremost is the "hamartia" or the tragic flaw being "hubris" or overvaulting arrogance. Such a hubristic demeanour brings low the tragic hero. From "peripeteia" and "anagnorisis" the tragic play advances culminating in an emotional purgation of the tragic hero and the ennoblement of the audience at hand. However, William Shakespeare deviates from such a concept. (Tragedy is to abjurate the pre-existing equipollence.)

William Shakespeare's theme is contradictory and conflicting. However, this adds a further testiment to the depth of his creativity. It adds the theme of internecine chaos, governmental kleptocracy, etc as the very involiable institutions are torn asunder to hubris. In the tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra, there is a dichotomy present: austere Rome and histrionic and sensuous Egypt. Egypt is seen as voluptuous: a world filled with eunuchs, concubines, lascivious desires and an ostentatious appearance, including the flosculation and grandiloquence that is featured within the promulgations, orders, decrees, and daily speech of the histrionic queen Cleopatra VII and the effeminate Marc Antony. This dichotomy is one filled with contradictions on multitudinous levels: from the differntiating situations in the two opposing cultures and the personalities of the main characters. Such a situation issues forth a semi-allegorical personage within the play of hubris personified, and the degeneration and denigration of the individual's self-worth to licentious passions.

I recommend the Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra as it incorporates a dense conglomerate of themes and issues that will forever be relevant: the theme of hubris and at the same time,
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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