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Antony and Cleopatra (Illustrated)
     

Antony and Cleopatra (Illustrated)

3.8 20
by William Shakespeare, Charles River Editors
 

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*Illustrated
*Includes Table of Contents

William Shakespeare is widely considered the greatest writer in the history of the English language, so renowned and respected that the time period in which he lived is often known as the Age of Shakespeare. Indeed, his genius is questioned only by those who doubt the authenticity of his authorship of timeless

Overview

*Illustrated
*Includes Table of Contents

William Shakespeare is widely considered the greatest writer in the history of the English language, so renowned and respected that the time period in which he lived is often known as the Age of Shakespeare. Indeed, his genius is questioned only by those who doubt the authenticity of his authorship of timeless classics like Romeo and Juliet. As Ben Jonson once put it, "He was not of an age, but for all time.” No other writer, in English or in any other language, can rival the appeal that Shakespeare has enjoyed around the world, and nobody’s had a bigger influence.

The “Bard of Avon” has a catalogue full of the best known plays and poetry in history. His surviving works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the 16th century. He then wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, and in his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies. Even those who have never read works like Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, or Hamlet are instantly familiar with the names.

Although his works are so well known, major details of his life are still sketchy. Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and even whether the works attributed to him were written by others.

This edition of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra is specially formatted with a Table of Contents and is illustrated with over a dozen pictures of history’s greatest playwright, Cleopatra, Antony, and more.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013557208
Publisher:
Charles River Editors
Publication date:
11/11/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Widely esteemed as the greatest writer in the English language, William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was an actor and theatrical producer in addition to writing plays and sonnets. Dubbed "The Bard of Avon," Shakespeare oversaw the building of the Globe Theatre in London, where a number of his plays were staged, the best-known of which include Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth. The First Folio, a printed book of 36 of his comedies, tragedies, and history plays, was published in 1623.

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Antony and Cleopatra 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
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Conrad_Jalowski More than 1 year ago
The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare represents the pinnacle of tragic effect. Through its purpose as an ecphonesis, or an emotional exclamation that evokes pathos, instills catharsis within the audience and an epiphany that provokes the audience to intense oscillations of emotion in the phantasmagorical layout of this tragedy, dramatic effect and superiority is achieved.

English tragedy such as of Nathaniel Lee and William Shakespeare did not adhere closely to the dramatic theories of Aristotle, the theories of Lodovico Castelvetro of Renaissance theory and Neo-Classical theory of Moliere, Racine and Corneille. It did not adhere to the Three Unities, or the Unity of Time, the Unity of Space and the Unity of Action. Aristotle argued that the time should not succeed a twenty-four hour period whilst Lodovico Castelvetro argued that the tragedy should not succeed twelve hours; that the tragedy should take place at the same area of space and that it should have no subplots, or nothing that would impair the ability to adhere to the grand theme and essence of the tragedy; all aspects must serve the main theme of the tragedy. Along with the utilization of chorus, Aristotle, Lodovico Castelvetro, Friedrich Schiller, John Dryden, Racine, Moliere and Corneille all adhered to the "Classical Theme". Furthermore, William Shakespeare deviates from Aristotelian concepts through the concept of a contradictory plot that serves not to further the purpose of a single and grand theme but that of itself. Though containing a tragic hero is central to the tragedy as defined by Aristotle, such is shifted in a future date by the Hegelian World-Historical Individual although it too has its roots to the Aristotelian tragic hero. First and foremost is the "hamartia" or the tragic flaw being "hubris" or overvaulting arrogance. Such a hubristic demeanour brings low the tragic hero. From "peripeteia" and "anagnorisis" the tragic play advances culminating in an emotional purgation of the tragic hero and the ennoblement of the audience at hand. However, William Shakespeare deviates from such a concept. (Tragedy is to abjurate the pre-existing equipollence.)

William Shakespeare's theme is contradictory and conflicting. However, this adds a further testiment to the depth of his creativity. It adds the theme of internecine chaos, governmental kleptocracy, etc as the very involiable institutions are torn asunder to hubris. In the tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra, there is a dichotomy present: austere Rome and histrionic and sensuous Egypt. Egypt is seen as voluptuous: a world filled with eunuchs, concubines, lascivious desires and an ostentatious appearance, including the flosculation and grandiloquence that is featured within the promulgations, orders, decrees, and daily speech of the histrionic queen Cleopatra VII and the effeminate Marc Antony. This dichotomy is one filled with contradictions on multitudinous levels: from the differntiating situations in the two opposing cultures and the personalities of the main characters. Such a situation issues forth a semi-allegorical personage within the play of hubris personified, and the degeneration and denigration of the individual's self-worth to licentious passions.

I recommend the Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra as it incorporates a dense conglomerate of themes and issues that will forever be relevant: the theme of hubris and at the same time,