The Anybodies

The Anybodies

4.5 44
by N. E. Bode, Peter Ferguson
     
 

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The Anybodies

Fern discovers that she was swapped at birth and leaves her tragically dull parents for an unforgettable adventure with her true father, the Bone. Just who are the Anybodies? You'll have to read to find out! Narrated by the hilariously intrusive N. E. Bode, The Anybodies is a magical adventure for readers of all ages.

The Nobodies

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Overview

The Anybodies

Fern discovers that she was swapped at birth and leaves her tragically dull parents for an unforgettable adventure with her true father, the Bone. Just who are the Anybodies? You'll have to read to find out! Narrated by the hilariously intrusive N. E. Bode, The Anybodies is a magical adventure for readers of all ages.

The Nobodies

Fern Drudger's quirky adventures continue in this delightful sequel to The Anybodies. She goes to Camp Happy Sunshine Good Times and is bombarded by desperate messages from people who call themselves the Nobodies. But who are the Nobodies, and what do they want from Fern?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Writing under a pseudonym, the adult novelist Julianna Baggott introduces Fern Drudger, who keeps to herself the seemingly magical things she witnesses. Ages 10-13. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
It is actually a relief to Fern Drudger when she finds out that, in fact, she is really not a Drudger at all. Although most children would be upset to learn that they had been accidentally switched at birth, Fern is decidedly relived by the news. Suddenly, the fact that she has never felt at home in the beige house with the beige shutters makes sense. She and the Drudgers have never seen the world the same way, and this latest turn of events seems to explain that. The Drudgers are also relieved. Fern, with her big, big eyes and out-of-control hair, has been a bit much for them to handle. It seems clear that orderly, Drudger-like Howard might be just that much easier for them to handle. It is agreed that the children will be swapped, for the summer. Howard will stay with the Drudgers and Fern will go with her father, the Bone. What a summer it will be! Fern will learn all about the Anybodies, people who can make themselves appear to be anyone (or anything) they desire. She will try to heal a Rooster Man. She will meet her dotty grandmother, who lives in a house that is made of books and filled with books. She will pretend that she is Ida Bibb, daughter of an encyclopedia salesman. She will search for an important, magical book called The Art of Being Anybody, while being pursued by the Miser, a dangerous man who will stop at nothing to get his hands on the book. Through it all, Fern will really be searching for her real home, learning about her dad, finding out the meaning of family, and coming to know herself. From its dedication page to the acknowledgements, N. E. Body's novel is a rollicking, hilarious adventure. If modern kids read under their bedcovers at night, they will betempted to locate their flashlights and stay up late with this thrilling page-turner. Sure to remind the reader of Lemony Snicket's series, the Harry Potter novels, and many of the thirty classics mentioned within its pages, N. E. Bode's novel is, nevertheless, one of a kind. 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 10 to 14.
—Heidi Hauser Green
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-This inventive novel has elements of Cornelia Funke's Inkheart (Scholastic, 2003) and Lemony Snicket's "A Series of Unfortunate Events" (HarperCollins). Fern Drudger, an imaginative misfit in her extraordinarily boring family, discovers that she and Howard Bone were switched at birth. The adults decide that the children will spend the summer with their birth parents and Fern meets her father, the Bone. He is an "Anybody"-he can change into someone or something else. However, he's not very good at it. He's convinced that Fern can help him find The Art of Being Anybody, a book once owned by his dead wife, which will allow him to improve his skills-but he must locate it before his enemy, the Miser, does and stop him from using it for evil purposes. Fern and the Bone end up in disguise at Fern's grandmother's boarding house, a magical, if dilapidated, palace of books, where anything can happen, especially if you happen to be an Anybody. Like Snicket, Bode is an amusing presence within this story about family, imagination, love of the written word, the dangers of hypnosis, and how to put an army of fairies to good use. The writing is fluid, the characters are multifaceted, and the situations range from poignant to gloriously silly. Eye-catching, black-and-white sketches echo the story's nuances and add to the atmosphere. There's laugh-out-loud humor, fantasy, mystery, real-life family drama, and the potential for a sequel. What more could a reader want?-Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A writer for adults and YAs takes a pen name for this witty, sometimes hilarious tale, punctuated with authorial asides and featuring switched babies, hidden identities, magical transformations, and allusions to literary classics. Frequently interrupting herself to slam her creative-writing teacher, apologize for putting in talking animals, etc., the chatty narrator follows Fern (12) as she is whisked away from her beige and orderly household to the book-stuffed boarding house where her real mother, who died in childbirth, had grown up possessing both a manual for shapechanging and the ability to shake characters or items right off any printed page. As she helps her still-grieving real father search for the manual before it can fall into the hands of a sinister magician known as The Miser, Fern discovers, to her delight, that she's inherited her mother's gift. Bode scatters the grounds with hobbits, fairies, clothed rabbits, teacups labeled "Drink Me," and other references for well-read children to catch, assembles a cast of fundamentally decent sorts led by a preteen with plenty on the ball, and concocts a tangled plot with a clever twist at the end, plus plenty of loose threads to connect a sequel. (Fiction. 10-13)
Detroit Free Press
“Readers will enjoy the adventrue, the humor, and the introduction of some fresh new characters.”
People
“Potter-style magic meets Snickety-y irreverence in a saga of a girl swapped at birth.”
Girl's Life Magazine
“A literary treat.”
People Magazine
"Potter-style magic meets Snickety-y irreverence in a saga of a girl swapped at birth."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061905919
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/05/2009
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
601,706
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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