Apocalypse 91...The Enemy Strikes Black

Apocalypse 91...The Enemy Strikes Black

by Public Enemy
     
 

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Coming down after the twin high-water marks of It Takes a Nation of Millions and Fear of a Black Planet, Public Enemy shifted strategy a bit for their fourth album, Apocalypse 91...The Enemy Strikes Black. By and large, they abandon the rich, dense musicality of Planet, shifting toward a sleek, relentless, aggressive attack --

Overview

Coming down after the twin high-water marks of It Takes a Nation of Millions and Fear of a Black Planet, Public Enemy shifted strategy a bit for their fourth album, Apocalypse 91...The Enemy Strikes Black. By and large, they abandon the rich, dense musicality of Planet, shifting toward a sleek, relentless, aggressive attack -- Yo! Bum Rush the Show by way of the lessons learned from Millions. This is surely a partial reaction to their status as the Great Black Hope of rock & roll; they had been embraced by a white audience almost in greater numbers than black, leading toward rap-rock crossovers epitomized by this album's leaden, pointless remake of "Bring the Noise" as a duet with thrash metallurgists Anthrax. It also signals the biggest change here -- the transition of the Bomb Squad to executive-producer status, leaving a great majority of the production to their disciples, the Imperial Grand Ministers of Funk. This isn't a great change, since the Public Enemy sound has firmly been established, giving the new producers a template to work with, but it is a notable change, one that results in a record with a similar sound but a different feel: a harder, angrier, determined sound, one that takes its cues from the furious anger surging through Chuck D's sociopolitical screeds. And this is surely PE's most political effort, surpassing Millions through the use of focused, targeted anger, a tactic evident on Planet. Yet it was buried there, due to the seductiveness of the music. Here, everything is on the surface, with the bluntness of the music hammering home the message. Arriving after two records where the words and music were equally labyrinthine, folding back on each other in dizzying, intoxicating ways, it is a bit of a letdown to have Apocalypse be so direct, but there is no denying that the end result is still thrilling and satisfying, and remains one of the great records of the golden age of hip-hop.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/06/1994
Label:
Def Jam
UPC:
0731452347923
catalogNumber:
523479
Rank:
29825

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Public Enemy   Primary Artist,Group
True Mathematics   Group,Track Performer
Anthrax   Track Performer
Macdowell   Bass
Sister Souljah   Background Vocals,Track Performer
Frank Abel   Keyboards
Joey Belladonna   Bass
Charlie Benante   Drums
Chuck D   Vocals
Matt Fallon   Vocals
Flavor Flav   Vocals
Allan Givens   Horn
Richard Gordon   Drums
Scott Ian   Guitar
Tyrone Jefferson   Horn
Steve Moss   Conga
Dan Spitz   Guitar
Terminator   Turntables
Fred Wells   Guitar
Lorenzo Wyche   Horn
Rick Gordon   Drums
Frank Able   Keyboards
Jefferson Wyche   Horn

Technical Credits

Anthrax   Composer,Contributor
Bomb Squad   Executive Producer
Chuck D   Composer,Contributor
Cerwin Depper   Arranger,Composer,Director,Producer
Flavor Flav   Contributor
Bob Fudjinski   Engineer
Gary G-Wiz   Arranger,Composer,Director,Programming,Producer
J.B.L.   Arranger,Composer,Director,Producer
Stuart Robertz   Arranger,Composer,Director,Programming,Producer
Hank Shocklee   Composer,Contributor
Terminator   Contributor
Kirk Yano   Engineer
Eric "Vietnam" Sadler   Composer
Harry Allen   Contributor
Santiago   Composer

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