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Apology [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Apology is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel" (24b). "Apology" here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word "apologia") of speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions . The general term apology, in context to literature, defends a world from attack ...
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Apology

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Overview

The Apology is Plato's version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of "corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel" (24b). "Apology" here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word "apologia") of speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions . The general term apology, in context to literature, defends a world from attack (opposite of satire-which attacks the world).
Xenophon, who wrote his own Apology of Socrates, indicates that a number of writers had published accounts of Socrates' defense. According to one prominent scholar, "Writing designed to clear Socrates' name was doubtless a particular feature of the decade or so following 399 BC". Many scholars guess that Plato's Apology was one of the first, if not the very first, dialogues Plato wrote, though there is little if any evidence. Plato's Apology is commonly regarded as the most reliable source of information about the historical Socrates.

Except for two brief exchanges with Meletus (at 24d-25d and 26b-27d), where the monologue becomes a dialogue, the text is written in the first person from Socrates' point of view, as though it were Socrates' actual speech at the trial. During the course of the speech, Socrates twice mentions Plato as being present (at 34a and 38b). There is, however, no real way of knowing how closely Socrates' words in the Apology match those of Socrates at the actual trial, even if it was Plato's intention to be accurate in this respect. One contemporary criticism of Plato's Apology is perhaps implied by the opening paragraphs of Xenophon's Apology, assuming that the former antedated the latter; Xenophon remarks that previous writers had failed to make clear the reason for Socrates' boastful talk in the face of the death penalty. Xenophon's account disagrees in some other respects with the details of Plato's Apology, but he nowhere explicitly claims it to be inaccurate.
The Apology begins with Socrates saying he does not know if the men of Athens (his jury) have been persuaded by his accusers. This first sentence is crucial to the theme of the entire speech. Indeed, in the Apology Socrates will suggest that philosophy begins with a sincere admission of ignorance; he later clarifies this, dramatically stating that whatever wisdom he has, comes from his knowledge that he knows nothing (23b, 29b).

Socrates imitates, parodies, and even corrects the Orators by asking the jury to judge him not by his oratorical skills, but by the truth (cf. Lysias XIX 1,2,3, Isaeus X 1, Isocrates XV 79, Aeschines II 24). Socrates says he will not use ornate words and phrases that are carefully arranged, but will speak using the expressions that come into his head. He says he will use the same way of speaking that he is heard using at the agora and the money tables. In spite of his disclaimers, Socrates proves to be a master orator who is not only eloquent and persuasive, but even wise. This is how he corrects the Orators, showing what they should have been doing all along, speaking the truth persuasively with wisdom. Although it is clear that Socrates was offered the opportunity to appease the listeners with even a minimal concession to avoid the penalty, he consciously does not do so, and his speech does not allow for acquittal. Accordingly, Socrates is condemned to death.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781775451457
  • Publisher: The Floating Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 118 KB

Meet the Author

Benjamin Jowett (15 April 1817 - 1 October 1893) was renowned as an influential tutor and administrative reformer in the University of Oxford, a theologian and translator of Plato. He was Master of Balliol College, Oxford.

Plato (428/427 or 424/423 BC - 348/347 BC) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece and an influential figure in philosophy, central in Western philosophy. He was Socrates' student, and founded the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with Socrates and his most famous student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. Alfred North Whitehead once noted: "the safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato."

Plato's dialogues have been used to teach a range of subjects, including philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric, religion and mathematics. His theory of Forms began a unique perspective on abstract objects, and led to a school of thought called Platonism. Plato's writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato's texts.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2013

    Posiden

    Gtg

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    River

    I am an ass-hole.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    SILVERMOONSTARS APOLOGY LETTER

    Dear River(rachel), you were my bestfriend.. but you left me, along with everyone else.. this isnt your fault though.. i lve you, but i needed this.. im sorry.. :'( ..... stay strong..;
    Dear Holly, im sorry. You tried talkin me out of his but you couldnt.. thk you for trying though. I love you... stay strong..;
    Dear Silencer, Im dorry for cheating on you. Im sorry for coming into your life. You must be happy im no longer in it, huh? Well, have fun with you huge family... i know youl just think thi is for attention and stupid so.. yeah:'( goodbye..;
    Dear anyone else who is reading this, thanks for making RP fun for awhile.. if you were a part of my life, im sorry and thanks for being there when you were there. Aha.. well, goodbye.. stay strong.. Sincerely, Silvermoonstar's RPer, Emma..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Zeldas spirit

    *only speaking in hyrulean* "Whitefoot, as a griffin, we cant change our names. Thats why me and my sisters were offened...our names were the only things we had left of our parents........im sorry too....we could of taken it lighter...... but i forgive you...sadly Nayru is no longer with us.....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Whitefoot to Zelda

    "I'm really sorry. I had no idea! I guess that since I had just been appointed deputy, I was a bit full of myself. Thanks for forgiving me. And I'm sorry that Nayru is not here. If you don't mind me asking, what happened? You n't have to answer if you n't want to." ~Relieved Whitefoot

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Tori

    NO!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Wolf

    Talk to he.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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