Apostrophe

Overview


you are entirely happy with your poem / you are not happy then there is no charge and your deposit is returned / you are totally satisfied with the outcome / you are a man / you are a little confused / you are entirely happy with your poem / you are not happy then there is no charge and your deposit is returned / you are totally satisfied with the outcome . . . ”Apostrophe” is: a) a figure of speech in which a person, an abstract quality or a nonexistent entity is addressed as though present b) a poem written in...
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Overview


you are entirely happy with your poem / you are not happy then there is no charge and your deposit is returned / you are totally satisfied with the outcome / you are a man / you are a little confused / you are entirely happy with your poem / you are not happy then there is no charge and your deposit is returned / you are totally satisfied with the outcome . . . ”Apostrophe” is: a) a figure of speech in which a person, an abstract quality or a nonexistent entity is addressed as though present b) a poem written in 1993 in which every sentence is an apostrophe c) a program—apostropheengine.ca—based on the 1993 poem that hijacks search engines in order to extend the poem infinitely d) a book of poetry written using the website The answer: e) all of the above. Bill Kennedy and Darren Wershler-Henry’s Apostrophe contains all of these things, except the search engine (but you can visit that any time you like). Each line from the original poem has become the title of a new poem generated by the program’s metonymic romp through the World Wide Web. Phrases rub against each other promiscuously; poems and readers alike come to their own conclusions. The results are by turns poignant, banal, offensive and hilarious, but always surprising and always unaffected. In other words, everything a book of contemporary poetry should be, and then some. Poet and scholar Charles Bernstein has suggested that Apostrophe may be related to Freud’s notion of the uncanny, a somnambulistic drift that appears aimless yet somehow always returns to “you.” Apostrophe is an entirely new kind of poetry: neither stable nor unstable, sections come and go, but the overall shape of the poem remains vaguely familiar, like a trick of memory.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781550227222
  • Publisher: ECW Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2006
  • Series: Misfits Series
  • Pages: 293
  • Product dimensions: 5.32 (w) x 8.72 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Meet the Author


Bill Kennedy is the artistic director of the Scream Literary Festival, a poetry editor for Coach House Books, and an organizer of the Lexiconjury Reading Series. Darren Wershler-Henry teaches communication studies at Wilfrid Laurier University and is the author of "Free as in Speech and Beer" and "The Tapeworm Foundry." They both live in Toronto.
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