Appalachian Trail Hiker

Appalachian Trail Hiker

by Victoria Logue, Frank Logue
     
 

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A classic now in its Fourth Edition, The Appalachian Trail Hiker is today’s platinum standard for the latest must-have information for the 4 million day, section, and thru hikers who explore the Appalachian Trail each year. The guide includes: the latest information on hiking the AT with a GPS; comprehensive trail club information, including websites;

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Overview

A classic now in its Fourth Edition, The Appalachian Trail Hiker is today’s platinum standard for the latest must-have information for the 4 million day, section, and thru hikers who explore the Appalachian Trail each year. The guide includes: the latest information on hiking the AT with a GPS; comprehensive trail club information, including websites; valuable step-by-step information on preparing to hike the A.T.; crucial information on nutrition and diet; expanded coverage on shelters, cabins, and campgrounds; and details on choosing the best equipment. With the help of dozens of A.T. hikers, the authors have gathered over 100,000 miles of A.T. experience into this commonsense guide on the nation’s oldest trail system. Whether you are planning an overnight hike in Virginia, a two-week trek through the Smokies, or a thru hike from Georgia to Maine, The Appalachian Trail Hiker is your passport to A.T. adventures in the new millennium.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897325837
Publisher:
Menasha Ridge Press
Publication date:
12/01/2004
Edition description:
Fourth Edition
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
621,275
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 8.92(h) x 0.69(d)

Read an Excerpt

Taking Breaks
When we first started hiking, we took what we called a pack-off break every 2 miles and pack-on breaks after almost every hill. A pack-on or bend-over break is accomplished by leaning over and holding your knees so that your back supports all the pack's weight. Try it; it really helps when you first start hiking. By the time we had hiked 500 miles, we could hike for hours without any breaks at all.

Taking breaks does slow down your overall pace. One way to avoid frequent stops and keep up your pace is to use the rest step when ascending mountains. Perform the rest step by pausing for a moment with all your weight centered on your downhill leg, which should be kept straight. Then step forward and pause again with your weight on the opposite leg, which is now the downhill leg. Vary the length of the pause as needed. This step will not only get you up a steep slope sooner but will get you up a mountain with less effort.

The idea is to use this step on extremely tough sections of a hike by pausing slightly with each step-continual movement instead of vigorous hiking separated by a number of breaks.

But above all, listen to your body. If you feel overheated, dizzy, or nauseous, stop and rest. These could be signs of emerging problems (see pages 128-130) or the fact you have overextended yourself. Better to reduce your pace than suffer an injury because you were overcome with exertion.

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