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The Apple Trees at Olema: New and Selected Poems
     

The Apple Trees at Olema: New and Selected Poems

4.6 5
by Robert Hass
 

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“No practicing poet has more talent than Robert Hass.”
Atlantic Monthly

 

The National Book Award-winning author of Time and Materials, Robert Hass is one of the most revered of all living poets. With The Apple Trees at Olema, the former Poet Laureate and winner of the 2008

Overview

“No practicing poet has more talent than Robert Hass.”
Atlantic Monthly

 

The National Book Award-winning author of Time and Materials, Robert Hass is one of the most revered of all living poets. With The Apple Trees at Olema, the former Poet Laureate and winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize offers twenty new and selected poems grounded in the beauty of the physical world. As with all of the collections of this great artist’s work, published far too infrequently, The Apple Trees at Olema is a cause for celebration.

Editorial Reviews

Steven Ratiner
At the outset—and, I suspect at the core even still—Robert Hass is a poet of praise: praise for the beauty of the natural world, for the long unfolding of our human story. ("Praise" was even the title of one of Hass's early collections.) But he is a modern man, engaged with the philosophical, aesthetic and political turmoil of our times. The Apple Trees at Olema offers new poems and a generous sampling of five published collections, and his achievement is often nothing less than splendid.
—The Washington Post
David Orr
…a milestone in what is generally regarded as one of the more successful careers…in contemporary American poetry…And indeed, the best work here is terrific…Hass's greatest strength as a poet…is his equanimity, a quality that sets him apart from peers who rely on a sense of imbalance. That imbalance can register as pressure (that is, the language of the poem may seem inadequate to the task it's asked to perform), or it can involve deliberate disjunctions in voice, tone, syntax and so forth. Reading a good Hass poem, though, is like watching a painter whose brush strokes are so reassuringly steady you hardly notice how much complex and unsettling depth has been added to the canvas.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Hass's first retrospective allows us to trace the development of the narrative voice he began cultivating most powerfully with 1979's Praise. Who can forget their first reading of “Meditation at Lagunitas,” in which Hass tells us we call it longing “because desire is full/ of endless distances”? The new poems show Hass at the height of his narrative powers, as in “Some of David's Story,” where the dissolution of a loving relationship is told to us in brief anecdotes by David himself. Recent poems from Time and Materials ask direct, bird's-eye view questions: “What is to be done with our species? Because/ We know we're going to die, to be submitted to that tingling of atoms once again.” Hass's work derives its strength from how it challenges both breath and line. Few are the poems in which Hass doesn't push his breath, and ours, almost to the point of breaking. He tries to get every word he can into each line, every detail he can into each poem, as though, if these feats are possible, then it's also possible to save some part of the world from dissolution. (Apr.)
Booklist
“[A] lustrous retrospective collection...Hass distills experiences down to their essence as he limns landscapes, portrays friends and loved ones, and imagines the struggles of strangers. The ordinary is cracked open to reveal metaphysical riddles in poems that feel so natural, their formal complexities nearly elude our detection.”
Christian Science Monitor
“THE APPLE TREES AT OLEMA...masterly conveys the beauty and fragility of the physical world....earthy yet illuminating, complex yet clear-eyed....The result is poetry that seems to breathe, inhaling softly in some cases, exhaling sharply in others.”
New York Times Book Review
“A milestone in what is generally regarded as one of the more successful careers in contemporary American poetry...Reading a good Hass poem...is like watching a painter whose brush strokes are so reassuringly steady you hardly notice how much complex and unsettling depth has been added to the canvas.”
Washington Post
“Hass’s achievement is often nothing less than splendid. . . . Conscious of language and its limitations, the tug-of-war between mind and body, Hass’s newest work still manages to wholeheartedly engage with the world around him . . . a generous gift for any reader.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061986154
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/23/2010
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
1,109,423
File size:
469 KB

Meet the Author

Robert Hass was born in San Francisco. His books of poetry include The Apple Trees at Olema (Ecco, 2010), Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner Time and Materials (Ecco, 2008), Sun Under Wood (Ecco, 1996), Human Wishes (1989), Praise (1979), and Field Guide (1973), which was selected by Stanley Kunitz for the Yale Younger Poets Series. Hass also co-translated several volumes of poetry with Nobel Laureate Czeslaw Milosz and authored or edited several other volumes of translation, including Nobel Laureate Tomas Tranströmer's Selected Poems (2012) and The Essential Haiku: Versions of Basho, Buson, and Issa (1994). His essay collection Twentieth Century Pleasures: Prose on Poetry (1984) received the National Book Critics Circle Award. Hass served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997 and as Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. He lives in California with his wife, poet Brenda Hillman, and teaches at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Apple Trees at Olema: New and Selected Poems 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What whaaaat?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Grins. Hello there Skysong! How are you?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tired....*yawns*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago