AppleScript For Dummies

Overview

Spending a little time with this book can save lots of time on the computer!

AppleScript is object-oriented programming language used to write script files to automate tasks and customize applications for the Mac. AppleScript can automate much of what you do with your Mac computer, saving time and helping ...

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Overview

Spending a little time with this book can save lots of time on the computer!

AppleScript is object-oriented programming language used to write script files to automate tasks and customize applications for the Mac. AppleScript can automate much of what you do with your Mac computer, saving time and helping you be more productive. Businesses and individuals frequently use it for:

  • Batch processing
  • File conversion and manipulation
  • Performing tasks at specified times
  • Transferring information between databases and other applications
  • Creating automated workflows by linking the actions of multiple applications to perform a series of related tasks

Written by Tom Trinko, a Mac man since 1984,and author of articles for MacTutor and MacTech Journal, AppleScript For Dummies, 2nd Edition covers everything from the basics to more advanced stuff, with information on:

  • Finding and installing AppleScript
  • Using AppleScript to automate tasks in programs such as Word, Excel, FileMaker Pro, and the Mac OS Finder
  • Arranging applications to work together to accomplish complex tasks
  • Controlling applications that aren’t even scriptable
  • Taking advantage of tools that make composing AppleScript programs easy and fun
  • Finding additional AppleScript information on the Internet and elsewhere

With this book, you’ll discover how to script Internet activities, iLife applications, and more. Then, instead of letting your computer and/or software dictate how you do things (and often, how you have to do them over and over and over), you take charge! You’ll agree —this book is MacNificent!

Designed as a reference for the important features of AppleScript including AppleScript syntax, the AppleScript tools, Script Editor, Scriptable Text Editor, and the Scriptable Finder, this book covers commands associated with the Scriptable Finder, as well as the best of the available freeware, shareware, and commercial scripting additions.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Sure, you love your Mac, but work is still work: Why spend more time on it than necessary? Wherever possible, why not let AppleScript automate it? It’s easier than you think -- especially if you’ve got AppleScript for Dummies, Second Edition.

Here are all the fundamentals, plus practical intros to scripting Photoshop, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, FileMaker, Safari, .Mac, iTunes, iPhoto, iMovie, iVD, and iChat. You’ll even learn how to trigger scripts with iCal calendar events: Cool.

This book’s perfect for anyone who’s never written a script or program -- or those who have but are new to AppleScript. Which, by the way, has just been updated with new features and a new Script Editor -- all covered here, too. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2003 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764574948
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 9/3/2004
  • Series: For Dummies Series
  • Edition description: Collectors Ed/
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 402
  • Sales rank: 804,475
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.84 (d)

Meet the Author

Born in Chicago, Tom Trinko has lived a deprived life, never once having butchered a hog. In an attempt to improve the quality of life in Chicago, he pursued his higher education in Pasadena, California, at Cal Tech. He moved to Wisconsin for the better climate and picked up his PhD in physics, graduating with the official title of mad scientist. His first smart move was marrying a woman who worked at Apple and who had an Apple IIe. With that, he was able to extend his professional programming career, which began in 1972, to home computers. His long-suffering wife brought a Mac home in 1984, which marked the start of Tom’s enthusiasm for the only OS for people who want to get work done. He’s ordered the Mac around in Basic, Forth, C, Pascal, and about a billion or so scripting languages. Back when Apple didn’t know any better, he did contract work for Apple’s Developer University. In real life, he works on other platforms, ranging from supercomputers to UNIX workstations, which continually remind him of how spiffy the Mac really is. His current main objective in life is staying more computer literate than his kids.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

Part I: Getting Started.

Chapter 1: A Cannonball Dive into the Scripting Pool.

Chapter 2: AppleScript Basics without Stomach Acid.

Chapter 3: Writing a Script without Ink.

Part II: All You Ever Needed to Know about AppleScript You Learned in Part II.

Chapter 4: Values: Different Types of Information.

Chapter 5: Variables: Data Cupboards.

Chapter 6: Operators: Math without Mistakes.

Chapter 7: References: Being Picky about Data.

Chapter 8: Commands: Ordering AppleScript Around.

Chapter 9: I/O (I Owe) without Credit Cards.

Chapter 10: If: Letting Your Computer Make Decisions So You Can Blame It Later.

Chapter 11: Repeat: Going in Circles for Fun and Profit.

Chapter 12: Try: Dealing with Problems without Crashing.

Chapter 13: Handlers: Organizing Your Script.

Chapter 14: Properties: Storing Data for Awhile.

Chapter 15: Deploying Scripts: Cool Ways to Access Scripts.

Chapter 16: Autonomous Scripts: Working Unsupervised.

Chapter 17: Taking Charge of Applications.

Chapter 18: Debugging: Fixing Problems without DDT.

Chapter 19: Scripting Additions: Taking AppleScript to New Heights.

Chapter 20: Script Objects: Recycling Scripts for a Healthy Environment.

Chapter 21: Miscellaneous Advanced Stuff.

Part III: How to Control the World—or at Least Some Common Programs.

Chapter 22: Finder/System Tricks without Touching the Mouse.

Chapter 23: Business Applications and Microsoft Office 2004.

Chapter 24: Layout and Graphics Applications.

Chapter 25: Scripting the Web.

Chapter 26: Scripting iLife.

Chapter 27: GUI Scripting.

Part IV: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 28: More Than Ten Scriptable Applications.

Chapter 29: More Than Ten Scripting Resources.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2004

    Terrible

    I've had good luck with other Dummies IT books, so I thought I'd try this one. It's absolutely awful. The first problem is just the English; this is someone who probably failed high school English. The sentences are just strung together with no particular attention to structure. The information is also often just plain wrong--he skips over information as 'not important' when it is important. The jokes are so awful--many of them offensive if you were born after 1920--that they detract from the value of the book. The scripts, while they work, are often not things you'd do on an OS X system. He seems almost unaware that we're now using OS X, and that OS X is unix. Skip this book, and just get the O'Reilly book. Yes, it's intimidating, but if you read carefully it will make sense. Or get the old Danny Goodman book. Both are a lot better than this time waster.

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