Application Development Using C# and .NET

( 1 )

Overview

Application Development Using C# and .NET gives experienced developers unprecedented insight for building .NET enterprise applications with C#. A running case study covers the entire process: creating a monolithic C# console application; adding a Windows Forms interface; isolating functionality inside components, providing database access and security; and delivering functionality through ASP.NET and Web Services. Includes self-contained language overview for new C# users. ...
See more details below
Paperback
$33.35
BN.com price
(Save 33%)$49.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $33.34   
  • Used (18) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Application Development Using C# and .NET gives experienced developers unprecedented insight for building .NET enterprise applications with C#. A running case study covers the entire process: creating a monolithic C# console application; adding a Windows Forms interface; isolating functionality inside components, providing database access and security; and delivering functionality through ASP.NET and Web Services. Includes self-contained language overview for new C# users.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130933836
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 12/28/2001
  • Series: Robert J. Oberg Series
  • Pages: 656
  • Sales rank: 1,318,015
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

MICHAEL STIEFEL is a consultant who specializes in developing enterprise applications with Microsoft technology. His expertise covers all stages of design and implementation for multi-tier applications. He has worked for Microsoft and taught graduate-level software engineering at Northeastern University.

DR. ROBERT J. OBERG is the founder and President of Object Innovations, a leading developer of integrated courseware on fundamental software technologies including Microsoft .NET, COM/DCOM/COM+, MFC, OLE, and Java. His books include Understanding and Programming COM+ and Introduction to C# Using .NET (Prentice Hall PTR).

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Preface

Microsoft .NET is an advance in programming technology that greatly simplifies application development both for traditional, proprietary applications, and for the emerging paradigm of Web-based services. .NET is a complete restructuring of MicrosoftÕs whole system infrastructure and represents a major learning challenge for programmers developing applications on Microsoft platforms. The new platform includes a new programming language C# and a major class library, the .NET Framework.

This book covers important topics in the .NET Framework for experienced programmers. You do not need prior experience in C#, because there is a self-contained treatment, but you should have experience in some object-oriented language such as C++ or Java. The book could also be read by a seasoned Visual Basic programmer who has experience working with objects and components in VB.

If you already understand C#, you may safely skip or skim Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 5 contains important information about the interactions of C# and the .NET Framework. You may then proceed with a detailed study of the .NET Framework in Chapters 6 and beyond. For a thorough introduction to the C# language you may read the book Introduction to C# Using .NET.

The book is practical, with many examples and a major case study. The goal is to equip you to begin building significant applications using the .NET Framework. The book is part of The Integrated .NET Series from Object Innovations and Prentice Hall PTR.

Organization

The book is organized into five major parts, and is structured to make it easy for you to navigate to what you most need to know. The first part, consisting of Chapters 1 and 2, should be read by everyone. It answers the question "What is Microsoft .NET?" and outlines the programming model of the .NET Framework.

The second part, consisting of Chapters 3Ð5, covers the C# programming language. If you are already familiar with C# you can skim these chapters, paying the most attention to Chapter 5, which covers topics such as interfaces, delegates, and events. This chapter also describes important interactions between C# and the .NET Framework. The case study, which is elaborated throughout the entire book, is introduced in Chapter 4.

The third part, Chapters 6Ð9, covers important fundamental topics in the .NET Framework. Chapter 6 covers user interface programming using the Windows Forms classes. Chapter 7 discusses assemblies and deployment, which constitute a major advance in the simplicity and robustness of deploying Windows applications, ending the notorious "DLL hell." Chapter 8 delves into important .NET Framework classes, including the topics of metadata, serialization, threading, attributes, application domains, asynchronous programming, remoting, and memory management. Chapter 9 covers ADO.NET, which provides a consistent set of classes for accessing both relational and

The fourth part of the book provides an in-depth introduction to Web programming using ASP.NET and SOAP. Chapter 10 introduces the fundamentals of ASP.NET, including the use of Web Forms, which greatly simplifies the development of sophisticated Web sites. Chapter 11 covers SOAP and Web Services, which provide an easy-to-use and robust mechanism for heterogeneous systems to interoperate.

The final part of the book covers additional important topics in the .NET Framework. Chapter 12 covers the topic of security in detail, including code access security, declarative security, and the securing of Web applications and services. Chapter 13 introduces the debug and trace classes provided by .NET. Chapter 14 covers interoperability of .NET with COM and with Win32 applications.

Sample Programs

The only way to really learn a major framework is to read and write many, many programs, including some of reasonable size. This book provides many small programs that illustrate pertinent features of .NET in isolation, which makes them easy to understand. The programs are clearly labeled in the text, and they can all be found in the software distribution that accompanies this book.

A major case study, the Acme Travel Agency, is progressively developed in Chapters 4 through 12. It illustrates many features of C# and .NET working in combination, as they would in a practical application.

The sample programs are provided in a self-extracting file on the bookÕs Web site. When expanded, a directory structure is created, whose default root is c:\OI\NetCs. The sample programs, which begin with the second chapter, are in directories Chap02, Chap03, and so on. All the samples for a given chapter are in individual folders within the chapter directories. The names of the folders are clearly identified in the text. Each chapter that contains a step of the case study has a folder called CaseStudy, containing that step. If necessary, there is a readme.txt file in each chapter directory to explain any instructions necessary for getting the examples to work.

This book is part of The Integrated .NET Series. The sample programs for other books in the series are located in their own directories underneath \OI, so all the .NET examples from all books in the series will be located in a common area as you install them.

These programs are furnished solely for instructional purposes and should not be embedded in any software product. The software (including instructions for use) is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind.

Caveat

The book and the associated code were developed with Beta 2 of the .NET Framework. Microsoft has indicated that this version of .NET is close to what will be the final version. Nonetheless, changes will be made before .NET is released. The code in the examples has been verified to work only with Windows 2000. Database code has been verified with SQL Server 2000. Several examples in the database and security chapters have machine names embedded in connection strings or role names. When trying to run these examples, you will have to replace those names with the appropriate name for your machine. To make installation easy, the database examples run with user name "sa" and without a password. Needless to say, in a real system you should NEVER have any login id without a password or have a database application use sa to log into a database.

Web Sites

The Web site for the book series is:

www.objectinnovations.com/dotnet.htm

A link is provided at that Web site for downloading the sample programs for this book.

Additional information about .NET technology is available at:

www.reliablesoftware.com

The book sample programs are available at this Web site as well.

The Web site for the book will also have a list of .NET learning resources that will be kept up to date.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter concludes with a Summary.).

Preface.

Organization.

Sample Programs.

Caveat.

Web Sites.

Acknowledgments.

About this Series.

1. What is Microsoft .NET?

Microsoft and the Web. Windows on the Desktop. A New Programming Platform. The Role of XML.

2. .NET Fundamentals.

Problems of Windows Development. Applications of the Future.

3. C# Overview for Sophisticated Programmers.

Hello World in C#. Performing Calculations in C#. Classes. C# Type System. Strings. Arrays and Indexers. More about Methods. Exceptions. Unsafe Code.

4. Object-Oriented Programming in C#.

Review of Object-Oriented Concepts. Acme Travel Agency Case Study: Design. Inheritance in C#. Access Control. Acme Travel Agency Case Study: Implementation. More about Inheritance.

5. C# in the .NET Framework.

System.Object. Collections. Interfaces. Acme Travel Agency Case Study: Step 2. Generic Interfaces in .NET. Delegates. Events. Attributes.

6. User Interface Programming.

Windows Forms Hierarchy. Simple Forms Using .NET SDK. Windows Forms Event Handling. Menus. Controls. Visual Studio.NET and Forms. Dialog Boxes. ListBox Control. Acme Travel Agency Case Study-Step 3.

7. Assemblies and Deployment.

Assemblies. Private Assembly Deployment. Shared Assembly Deployment. Assembly Configuration. Multimodule Assemblies. Setup and Deployment Projects.

8. .NET Framework Classes.

Metadata and Reflection. Input and Output in .NET. Serialization. .NET Application Model. Context. Application Isolation. Asynchronous Programming. Remoting. Custom Attributes. Garbage Collection and Finalization.

9. Programming with ADO.NET.

.NET Data Providers. The Visual Studio.NET Server Explorer. Data Readers. Parameters Collection. SqlDataAdapter and the DataSet Class. DataSet Collections. DataSet Fundamentals. Database Transactions and Updates. Optimistic vs. Pessimistic Locking and the DataSet. Working with DataSets. Acme Travel Agency Case Study. XML Data Access. AirlineBrokers Database. Schema with Relationships. Typed DataSet.

10. ASP.NET and Web Forms.

What is ASP.NET? Web Forms Architecture. Request/Response Programming. Web Applications Using Visual Studio.NET. Acme Travel Agency Case Study. ASP.NET Applications. State in ASP.NET Applications. ASP.NET Configuration. Server Controls. Database Access in ASP.NET.

11. Web Services.

Protocols. Web Service Architecture. SOAP Differences. Web Service Class. Hotel Broker Web Service.

12. Security.

User-Based Security. Code Access Security. Internet Security. Role-Based Security in .NET. Forms-Based Authentication. Code Access Permissions. Code Identity. Security Policy.

13. Tracing and Debugging in .NET.

The TraceDemo Example. Enabling Debug and Trace Output. Using the Debug and Trace Classes. Using Switches to Enable Diagnostics. Enabling or Disabling Switches. TraceListener. Listeners Collection.

14. Interoperability.

Calling COM Components from Managed Code. Calling Managed Components from COM Client. Platform Invocation Services (PInvoke).

Appendix A Visual Studio.NET.

Overview of Visual Studio.NET. Creating a Console Application. Project Configurations. Debugging.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

Preface

Microsoft .NET is an advance in programming technology that greatly simplifies application development both for traditional, proprietary applications, and for the emerging paradigm of Web-based services. .NET is a complete restructuring of MicrosoftÕs whole system infrastructure and represents a major learning challenge for programmers developing applications on Microsoft platforms. The new platform includes a new programming language C# and a major class library, the .NET Framework.

This book covers important topics in the .NET Framework for experienced programmers. You do not need prior experience in C#, because there is a self-contained treatment, but you should have experience in some object-oriented language such as C++ or Java. The book could also be read by a seasoned Visual Basic programmer who has experience working with objects and components in VB.

If you already understand C#, you may safely skip or skim Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 5 contains important information about the interactions of C# and the .NET Framework. You may then proceed with a detailed study of the .NET Framework in Chapters 6 and beyond. For a thorough introduction to the C# language you may read the book Introduction to C# Using .NET.

The book is practical, with many examples and a major case study. The goal is to equip you to begin building significant applications using the .NET Framework. The book is part of The Integrated .NET Series from Object Innovations and Prentice Hall PTR.

Organization

The book is organized into five major parts, and is structured to make it easy for you to navigate to what you most need to know. The first part, consisting of Chapters 1 and 2, should be read by everyone. It answers the question "What is Microsoft .NET?" and outlines the programming model of the .NET Framework.

The second part, consisting of Chapters 3Ð5, covers the C# programming language. If you are already familiar with C# you can skim these chapters, paying the most attention to Chapter 5, which covers topics such as interfaces, delegates, and events. This chapter also describes important interactions between C# and the .NET Framework. The case study, which is elaborated throughout the entire book, is introduced in Chapter 4.

The third part, Chapters 6Ð9, covers important fundamental topics in the .NET Framework. Chapter 6 covers user interface programming using the Windows Forms classes. Chapter 7 discusses assemblies and deployment, which constitute a major advance in the simplicity and robustness of deploying Windows applications, ending the notorious "DLL hell." Chapter 8 delves into important .NET Framework classes, including the topics of metadata, serialization, threading, attributes, application domains, asynchronous programming, remoting, and memory management. Chapter 9 covers ADO.NET, which provides a consistent set of classes for accessing both relational and XML Data.

The fourth part of the book provides an in-depth introduction to Web programming using ASP.NET and SOAP. Chapter 10 introduces the fundamentals of ASP.NET, including the use of Web Forms, which greatly simplifies the development of sophisticated Web sites. Chapter 11 covers SOAP and Web Services, which provide an easy-to-use and robust mechanism for heterogeneous systems to interoperate.

The final part of the book covers additional important topics in the .NET Framework. Chapter 12 covers the topic of security in detail, including code access security, declarative security, and the securing of Web applications and services. Chapter 13 introduces the debug and trace classes provided by .NET. Chapter 14 covers interoperability of .NET with COM and with Win32 applications.

Sample Programs

The only way to really learn a major framework is to read and write many, many programs, including some of reasonable size. This book provides many small programs that illustrate pertinent features of .NET in isolation, which makes them easy to understand. The programs are clearly labeled in the text, and they can all be found in the software distribution that accompanies this book.

A major case study, the Acme Travel Agency, is progressively developed in Chapters 4 through 12. It illustrates many features of C# and .NET working in combination, as they would in a practical application.

The sample programs are provided in a self-extracting file on the bookÕs Web site. When expanded, a directory structure is created, whose default root is c:\OI\NetCs. The sample programs, which begin with the second chapter, are in directories Chap02, Chap03, and so on. All the samples for a given chapter are in individual folders within the chapter directories. The names of the folders are clearly identified in the text. Each chapter that contains a step of the case study has a folder called CaseStudy, containing that step. If necessary, there is a readme.txt file in each chapter directory to explain any instructions necessary for getting the examples to work.

This book is part of The Integrated .NET Series. The sample programs for other books in the series are located in their own directories underneath \OI, so all the .NET examples from all books in the series will be located in a common area as you install them.

These programs are furnished solely for instructional purposes and should not be embedded in any software product. The software (including instructions for use) is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind.

Caveat

The book and the associated code were developed with Beta 2 of the .NET Framework. Microsoft has indicated that this version of .NET is close to what will be the final version. Nonetheless, changes will be made before .NET is released. The code in the examples has been verified to work only with Windows 2000. Database code has been verified with SQL Server 2000. Several examples in the database and security chapters have machine names embedded in connection strings or role names. When trying to run these examples, you will have to replace those names with the appropriate name for your machine. To make installation easy, the database examples run with user name "sa" and without a password. Needless to say, in a real system you should NEVER have any login id without a password or have a database application use sa to log into a database.

Web Sites

The Web site for the book series is:

www.objectinnovations.com/dotnet.htm

A link is provided at that Web site for downloading the sample programs for this book.

Additional information about .NET technology is available at:

www.reliablesoftware.com

The book sample programs are available at this Web site as well.

The Web site for the book will also have a list of .NET learning resources that will be kept up to date.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

Microsoft .NET is an advance in programming technology that greatly simplifies application development both for traditional, proprietary applications, and for the emerging paradigm of Web-based services. .NET is a complete restructuring of MicrosoftÕs whole system infrastructure and represents a major learning challenge for programmers developing applications on Microsoft platforms. The new platform includes a new programming language C# and a major class library, the .NET Framework.

This book covers important topics in the .NET Framework for experienced programmers. You do not need prior experience in C#, because there is a self-contained treatment, but you should have experience in some object-oriented language such as C++ or Java. The book could also be read by a seasoned Visual Basic programmer who has experience working with objects and components in VB.

If you already understand C#, you may safely skip or skim Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 5 contains important information about the interactions of C# and the .NET Framework. You may then proceed with a detailed study of the .NET Framework in Chapters 6 and beyond. For a thorough introduction to the C# language you may read the book Introduction to C# Using .NET.

The book is practical, with many examples and a major case study. The goal is to equip you to begin building significant applications using the .NET Framework. The book is part of The Integrated .NET Series from Object Innovations and Prentice Hall PTR.

Organization

The book is organized into five major parts, and is structured to make it easy for you to navigate to what you most need to know. The first part,consisting of Chapters 1 and 2, should be read by everyone. It answers the question "What is Microsoft .NET?" and outlines the programming model of the .NET Framework.

The second part, consisting of Chapters 3Ð5, covers the C# programming language. If you are already familiar with C# you can skim these chapters, paying the most attention to Chapter 5, which covers topics such as interfaces, delegates, and events. This chapter also describes important interactions between C# and the .NET Framework. The case study, which is elaborated throughout the entire book, is introduced in Chapter 4.

The third part, Chapters 6Ð9, covers important fundamental topics in the .NET Framework. Chapter 6 covers user interface programming using the Windows Forms classes. Chapter 7 discusses assemblies and deployment, which constitute a major advance in the simplicity and robustness of deploying Windows applications, ending the notorious "DLL hell." Chapter 8 delves into important .NET Framework classes, including the topics of metadata, serialization, threading, attributes, application domains, asynchronous programming, remoting, and memory management. Chapter 9 covers ADO.NET, which provides a consistent set of classes for accessing both relational and XML Data.

The fourth part of the book provides an in-depth introduction to Web programming using ASP.NET and SOAP. Chapter 10 introduces the fundamentals of ASP.NET, including the use of Web Forms, which greatly simplifies the development of sophisticated Web sites. Chapter 11 covers SOAP and Web Services, which provide an easy-to-use and robust mechanism for heterogeneous systems to interoperate.

The final part of the book covers additional important topics in the .NET Framework. Chapter 12 covers the topic of security in detail, including code access security, declarative security, and the securing of Web applications and services. Chapter 13 introduces the debug and trace classes provided by .NET. Chapter 14 covers interoperability of .NET with COM and with Win32 applications.

Sample Programs

The only way to really learn a major framework is to read and write many, many programs, including some of reasonable size. This book provides many small programs that illustrate pertinent features of .NET in isolation, which makes them easy to understand. The programs are clearly labeled in the text, and they can all be found in the software distribution that accompanies this book.

A major case study, the Acme Travel Agency, is progressively developed in Chapters 4 through 12. It illustrates many features of C# and .NET working in combination, as they would in a practical application.

The sample programs are provided in a self-extracting file on the bookÕs Web site. When expanded, a directory structure is created, whose default root is c:\OI\NetCs. The sample programs, which begin with the second chapter, are in directories Chap02, Chap03, and so on. All the samples for a given chapter are in individual folders within the chapter directories. The names of the folders are clearly identified in the text. Each chapter that contains a step of the case study has a folder called CaseStudy, containing that step. If necessary, there is a readme.txt file in each chapter directory to explain any instructions necessary for getting the examples to work.

This book is part of The Integrated .NET Series. The sample programs for other books in the series are located in their own directories underneath \OI, so all the .NET examples from all books in the series will be located in a common area as you install them.

These programs are furnished solely for instructional purposes and should not be embedded in any software product. The software (including instructions for use) is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind.

Caveat

The book and the associated code were developed with Beta 2 of the .NET Framework. Microsoft has indicated that this version of .NET is close to what will be the final version. Nonetheless, changes will be made before .NET is released. The code in the examples has been verified to work only with Windows 2000. Database code has been verified with SQL Server 2000. Several examples in the database and security chapters have machine names embedded in connection strings or role names. When trying to run these examples, you will have to replace those names with the appropriate name for your machine. To make installation easy, the database examples run with user name "sa" and without a password. Needless to say, in a real system you should NEVER have any login id without a password or have a database application use sa to log into a database.

Web Sites

The Web site for the book series is:

www.objectinnovations.com/dotnet.htm

A link is provided at that Web site for downloading the sample programs for this book.

Additional information about .NET technology is available at:

www.reliablesoftware.com

The book sample programs are available at this Web site as well.

The Web site for the book will also have a of .NET learning resources that will be kept up to date.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2002

    Outstanding book. This book is clearly defined, in-depth and example-rich.

    This book gives experienced developers all the practical insight they need to build enterprise applications for Microsoft's .NET platform using C#. This book covers important topics in the .NET Framework for experienced programmers. This book is perfect for programmers who have basic knowledge in object-oriented languages such as C++ or Java but no need of prior experience in C#. The self-reliant treatment provides an easy and concrete insight to application development in C#. A seasoned Visual Basic programmer who has experience in working with objects and components in VB could also read the book.Using extensive code examples and a running case study, the authors cover the complete process of constructing a .NET application: creating a monolithic C# console application; enhancing it with a Windows Forms interface; isolating functionality inside components; adding database access and security; and finally delivering functionality through ASP.NET and Web Services.this book is intended for experienced developers and provide all the practical insight they need to build enterprise applications for Microsoft's .NET Platform using C#. This book is clearly defined, in-depth and example-rich. The major case study, the Acme Travel Agency, is progressively developed in Chapters 4 through 12. It illustrates many features of C# and .NET working in combination, as they would in a practical applications. The experienced C++, Java and VB programmers become efficient with .NET with the help of this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)