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Overview

75003-4

Building advanced Web-based enterprise applications: a comprehensive, systematic approach.

Three technologies are converging to dramatically change the nature of application development: client/server, object-orientation, and the Internet. This book is a complete guide to successfully integrating all of these technologies in your new enterprise applications.

Expert consultant and project manager Dr. Amjad Umar shows how to establish data architectures, application architectures, and frameworks that enable successful Web-based software development. He presents a detailed methodology for using middleware to engineer new applications—or reengineer existing ones. He also offers a systematic approach to cope with legacy systems—including legacy data access, data warehousing and application migration/transition strategies.

For each major issue confronting developers, Umar considers the state of today's marketplace, as well as trends that will powerfully impact development projects in the near future. The book contains extensive guidelines, implementation examples and case studies, using a wide range of technologies, including:

  • CORBA.
  • ActiveX.
  • PowerBuilder.
  • Encina.
  • CGI and other Web gateways

The book includes short tutorials on object-oriented concepts, distributed objects, the World Wide Web, and client/server middleware. Each chapter is written as a self-contained tutorial—making the book a valuable resource not only for IT professionals, but also for trainers, teachers, and advanced students.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780137500352
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 5/14/1997
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 624
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

AMJAD UMAR, Ph.D. is a Senior Scientist at Bellcore, and an Adjunct Professor at Rutgers University, Stevens Institute of Technology and the Fordham Graduate School of Business. At Bellcore, he specializes in distributed systems, and consults/leads projects in middleware for advanced data networks, electronic commerce, data quality, Web access to corporate resources, large scale data management, and legacy system re-engineering. He is also author of the companion book Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments.

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Read an Excerpt

xvii

Preface

This book explores the issues in building the new breed of Web-based applications that exploits object technologies, and deals with the large embedded base of legacy applications. The book is intended as a guide and a tutorial for the IT managers and practitioners who are involved in engineering of new applications and reengineering of existing (mostly legacy) applications.

The first part of the book reviews application (re)engineering issues, scans the IT infrastructure, and develops a general methodology for application (re)engineering. The second part concentrates on building Web-based object-oriented applications and explores enterprise- critical areas such as data architectures, application software architectures, and implementation issues (e.g., Web-Java, CORBA, ActiveX, OSF DCE). The third part presents critical examination of approaches to deal with legacy applications such as access/integration of legacy applications through the Web, data warehouses, and rearchitecture/migration strategies.

Several examples are presented and a single case study is developed throughout the book to illustrate the key points. Extensive references for additional information are provided.

Key Features of the Book

Focus on Applications. While many books are being written on the infrastructure (e.g., net- works, World Wide Web, Groupware, CORBA, etc.), this book concentrates on using the infrastructure to build applications for modern enterprises. In particular, application engineering as well as reengineering issues are discussed.

Web-Based Object-Oriented Applications View. We are interested in the class of enterprisewide applications that leverage powerful technologies such as the Web (e.g., Java, CGI), distributed objects (CORBA, ActiveX), and data access middleware (e.g., SQL gate- ways) to provide business value. These applications, termed object-oriented, client/server, Internet-based (OCSI) applications, are a special class of distributed applications for the enterprises of the 1990s and beyond. These three technologies are viewed as complementing each other to provide business value and not as replacements for each other.

Strategies to Deal with Legacy Applications. New applications must coexist with the large embedded base of existing (mostly legacy) applications. A systematic approach is suggested for dealing with legacy systems with discussion and analysis of legacy data access, data warehousing, and application migration/transition strategies.

Merging of Case Studies, Industrial Products, and Research Efforts. Each chapter is written as a self-contained tutorial with several case studies and examples to illustrate the key points throughout. State-of-the-market and state-of-the-art trends are noted in each chapter with numerous references for additional studies.

Integration with Infrastructure, in Particular Middleware, Issues. This book builds upon and uses the infrastructure and middleware discussed in the companion book ( “Object- Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments, ” A. Umar, Prentice Hall, 1997). Together, these two books form an invaluable source of information for modern enterprises.

Practical Hints, Guidelines, Checklists. Numerous practical hints, guidelines, and check- lists are highlighted throughout the book as sidebars for quick reference.

A Systematic Framework for Study. A framework for discussion and a general methodology is introduced early in the book to serve as a roadmap for study. The framework provides a basis for analysis and synthesis of the wide range of issues such as data architectures and application architectures.

In short, the reader of this book should develop a thorough understanding of how to engineer new applications and databases, and how to reengineer the existing terminal-host systems in an object-oriented client/server Internet world.

Book Outline

PART I: GETTING STARTED.

1: Application (Re)Engineering —The Big Picture.
2: Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments.
3: Methodology Overview: Planning and Modeling.

PART II: APPLICATION ENGINEERING: BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS.

4: Building New (Web-Based) Applications.
5: Enterprise Data Architectures.
6: Web-Based Application Software Architectures.
7: Implementation Concepts and Examples (Web, CORBA, ActiveX, DCE, Encina, PowerBuilder).

PART III: APPLICATION REENGINEERING: DEALING WITH LEGACIES.

8: Dealing with Legacy Applications: An Overview.
9: Access and Integration of Legacy Applications through the Web.
10: Data Warehouses.
11: Migration Strategies.
Intended Audience and Recommended Usage

This book is based on a synthesis of experience gained from three different sources. First, extensive project management, consulting, and system integration assignments in recent years in client/server systems, object-oriented technologies, Web-based applications, middleware evaluation, legacy data access, data warehousing, and data migration. Second, development and teaching of industrial training courses on client/server technologies and distributed systems that have been taught several times in the telecommunications industry and general IT community. Finally, teaching of graduate-level special topics courses in distributed systems for IT majors and computer-science students. This experience has indicated that this book should be useful as a reference for almost all IT managers and practitioners and also as a textbook for university courses and industrial training seminars. Specifically, this book should be of value to:


  • Architects and designers of information services (application designers, database designers, network designers).
  • Analysts and consultants of information technologies.
  • Planners of IT infrastructure and platforms.
  • Technical support personnel .
  • Managers of information technologies (CIO, MIS managers, database administrators, application development managers).
  • System integrators who combine databases, networks, and applications between different platforms.
  • Teachers of university courses in information technologies.
  • Technical trainers for professional development courses in information technology.
  • Researchers in computing and information technologies who need a broad coverage of the subject matter.
  • Students for an introduction to the subject matter with numerous references for additional studies.
    Depending on the background and interest of the reader, the book can be used in a variety of ways. This book has been, and can be, used in academic courses as well as in corporate training. Outlines of a university course and a two-day professional training course are suggested on the next page (the companion book “Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments ” is used as a reference book). These outlines are based on experience of teaching several university courses and industrial seminars in the last three years.
Specifically:

University Courses. This book can be used in the information systems concentration in business schools and industrial engineering departments at most universities. The courses, usually graduate level, have been attended by students from management, computer science and industrial engineering departments.

Professional Seminars and Corporate Training. This book has been used as a foundation for a two-day professional seminar under the title “Building Web-Based Applications. ”

University Course Outline: Distributed Application Systems
Week: 1 Topic: Introduction Reading: Chapter 1 Week: 2 Topic: IT platforms (Web technologies) Reading: Chapter 2 Week: 3 Topic: Middleware Reading: Chapter 2 Week:4 Topic: OO Concepts Reading: Chapter 2 Week: 5 Topic: A General Methodology Reading: Chapter 3 Week: 6 Topic: Web-based applications Reading: Chapter 4 Week: 7 Topic: Enterprise Data Architectures Reading: Chapter 5 Week: 8 Topic: Midterm Examination (or Project 1 Due) Week: 9 Topic: Application Software Architectures Reading: Chapter 6 Week: 10 Topic: Implementation Examples and Concepts Reading: Chapter 7 Week: 11 Topic:Legacy applications: The challenge Reading: Chapter 8 Week: 12 Topic: Access and Integration through the Web Reading: Chapter 9 Week: 13 Topic: Data Warehouses Reading: Chapter 10 Week: 14 Topic: Migration Strategies Reading: Chapter 11 Week: 15 Topic: Final Examination (or Project 2 Due) Professional Training Course: Building Web-Based Applications Session: 1 Topic: Introduction Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 1 Session: 2 Topic: IT Building Blocks: The Middleware Duration: 2.0 Hours Reading: Chapter 2 Session: 3 Topic: Web and distributed objects Duration: 1.5 Hours Reading: Chapter 2 Session: 4 Topic: A General Methodology Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 3 Session: 5 Topic: Web-based applications Duration: 1.5 Hours Reading: Chapter 4 Session: 6 Topic: Data and Application Architectures Duration: 1.5 Hours Reading: Chapters 5, 6 Session: 7 Topic: Implementation Examples and Concepts Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 7 Session: 8 Topic: Legacy applications: The challenge Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 8 Session: 9 Topic: Access and Integration through the Web Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 9 Session: 10 Topic: Data Warehouses Duration: 0.5 Hour Reading: Chapter 10 Session: 11 Topic: Migration Strategies and wrapup Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 11 Acknowledgments

Many of my colleagues and friends at Bellcore graciously agreed to review specific chapters for content and/or style. Here is an alphabetical list of the reviewers who commented on at least one chapter (some reviewed 4 to 5): Dr. Aloysius Cornelio, Prasad Ganti, Bret Gorsline, Dr. Jon Kettering, Tom Knoble, Frank Marchese, Dr. Paul Matthews, Mike Meiner, KJ Shah, and Dr. Gomer Thomas. I really feel fortunate to have access to so many experts who are also very nice folks.

In addition, many of my university friends read early drafts and made numerous suggestions. Professor Nabil Adams of Rutgers Graduate School of Business, Professor Ahmed Elmagarmid of Purdue University, Professor Peter Jurkat of the Stevens Institute of Technology, and Professor Jerry Luftman of Stevens Institute of Technology gave valuable suggestions about different topics.

I should not forget the contribution of many university students at Stevens Institute of Technology, Rutgers, and Fordham who “suffered ” through very rough drafts of many chapters. In addition, many attendees of professional-training seminars volunteered to review different chapters. The list of topics included in this book is based on extensive discussions with the university students and seminar attendees.

I want to express my gratitude toward my management (Dr. Satish Thatte, Rich Jacowleff, and Jac Simensen) for their understanding and support.

Conventions Used

We will use the following conventions in this book. Highlighted italics are used to indicate definition of new terms, italics are used for emphasis and bold letters are used for subject headings.

Interrelationships Between Books and Personal Remarks
Several people, especially faculty members from different universities, in the past few months have asked me how this book relates with my first book Distributed Computing and Client/Server Systems (Prentice Hall, 1993) and how/why did I decide to write two companion books instead of one large one. The following discussion, somewhat anecdotal, should help.

My first book covered a broad range of issues in distributed computing (networks, middle- ware, applications, and management issues). Due to the size (it exceeded 700 pages), I eliminated about 100 pages of application related topics from that book. During 1993 and 1994, I became involved in numerous application engineering/reengineering and IT infrastructure projects and wrote a few tutorials, as part of my practice, on emerging topics such as data warehouses, application architectures, distributed objects, and legacy data access. During a 1994 year-end conversation with my friend Paul Becker, a senior editor at Prentice Hall, we both concluded that the world could most certainly use another book by me that concentrated on the distributed application issues (the first book had only one chapter on this topic).

I started developing the manuscript at the end of 1994 but soon found that I needed to explain many of the IT infrastructure components, especially the perplexing middleware, before delving into the applications issues. So I did. The end result was that the new book was huge (more than 800 pages with roughly half on middleware and the other half on applications). After several conversations with Paul Becker, we both decided to break the material into two companion books: one on middleware and the other on application (re)engineering. This seemed to be a good idea because distributed computing is a vast and rapidly evolving field and it is difficult to discuss everything in one book. The following table attempts to show the interrelationships between my three books in terms of the following building blocks of distributed computing:

l Networks to provide the transport services in distributed computing environments l Middleware to enable the distributed applications l Applications to provide business value l Management and support issues to deal with administrative aspects of distributed computing Topics Discussed in Books on Distributed Computing

  • Topics “Distributed Computing and Client/ Server Systems ” (1993) “Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments ” (1997) “Application (Re)Engineering: Building Web-based Applications and Dealing with Legacies ” (1997)
  • Networks Extensive coverage (6 chapters) Light coverage (1 chapter) No coverage Middleware Moderate coverage (3 chapters) Extensive coverage (9 chapters) Light coverage (1 chapter)
  • Applications Light coverage (1 chapter) No coverage Extensive coverage (10 chapters) Management and Support Moderate coverage (2 chapters) No coverage No coverage I received a great deal of help during this process from several people at Prentice Hall. Of particular note are Eileen Clark as the production editor of both books, Maureen Diana as an administrative assistant and fire fighter, and Paul Becker as an overall “spiritual leader. ” Of course, my best friend and my wife, Dolorese, valiantly saw me through this undertaking. She has, as always, shown exceptional patience and tolerance for which I am greatly indebted to her. She continues to advise me and helps me in editing and preparing the material. It is a good example of teamwork.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Application (Re)Engineering - The Big Picture
Ch. 2 Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments
Ch. 3 Methodology Overview: Planning and Modeling
Ch. 4 Building New (Web-Based) Applications
Ch. 5 Enterprise Data Architectures
Ch. 6 Web-Based Application Software Architectures
Ch. 7 Implementation Concepts and Examples (Web, CORBA, ActiveX, DCE, Encina, PowerBuilder)
Ch. 8 Dealing with Legacy Applications: An Overview
Ch. 9 Access and Integration of Legacy Applications through the Web
Ch. 10 Data Warehouses
Ch. 11 Migration Strategies
Read More Show Less

Preface

xvii

Preface


This book explores the issues in building the new breed of Web-based applications that exploits object technologies, and deals with the large embedded base of legacy applications. The book is intended as a guide and a tutorial for the IT managers and practitioners who are involved in engineering of new applications and reengineering of existing (mostly legacy) applications.

The first part of the book reviews application (re)engineering issues, scans the IT infrastructure, and develops a general methodology for application (re)engineering. The second part concentrates on building Web-based object-oriented applications and explores enterprise- critical areas such as data architectures, application software architectures, and implementation issues (e.g., Web-Java, CORBA, ActiveX, OSF DCE). The third part presents critical examination of approaches to deal with legacy applications such as access/integration of legacy applications through the Web, data warehouses, and rearchitecture/migration strategies.

Several examples are presented and a single case study is developed throughout the book to illustrate the key points. Extensive references for additional information are provided.

Key Features of the Book

Focus on Applications. While many books are being written on the infrastructure (e.g., net- works, World Wide Web, Groupware, CORBA, etc.), this book concentrates on using the infrastructure to build applications for modern enterprises. In particular, application engineering as well as reengineering issues are discussed.

Web-Based Object-Oriented Applications View. We are interested in theclass of enterprisewide applications that leverage powerful technologies such as the Web (e.g., Java, CGI), distributed objects (CORBA, ActiveX), and data access middleware (e.g., SQL gate- ways) to provide business value. These applications, termed object-oriented, client/server, Internet-based (OCSI) applications, are a special class of distributed applications for the enterprises of the 1990s and beyond. These three technologies are viewed as complementing each other to provide business value and not as replacements for each other.

Strategies to Deal with Legacy Applications. New applications must coexist with the large embedded base of existing (mostly legacy) applications. A systematic approach is suggested for dealing with legacy systems with discussion and analysis of legacy data access, data warehousing, and application migration/transition strategies.

Merging of Case Studies, Industrial Products, and Research Efforts. Each chapter is written as a self-contained tutorial with several case studies and examples to illustrate the key points throughout. State-of-the-market and state-of-the-art trends are noted in each chapter with numerous references for additional studies.

Integration with Infrastructure, in Particular Middleware, Issues. This book builds upon and uses the infrastructure and middleware discussed in the companion book ( “Object- Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments, ” A. Umar, Prentice Hall, 1997). Together, these two books form an invaluable source of information for modern enterprises.

Practical Hints, Guidelines, Checklists. Numerous practical hints, guidelines, and check- lists are highlighted throughout the book as sidebars for quick reference.

A Systematic Framework for Study. A framework for discussion and a general methodology is introduced early in the book to serve as a roadmap for study. The framework provides a basis for analysis and synthesis of the wide range of issues such as data architectures and application architectures.

In short, the reader of this book should develop a thorough understanding of how to engineer new applications and databases, and how to reengineer the existing terminal-host systems in an object-oriented client/server Internet world.


Book Outline

PART I: GETTING STARTED.

1: Application (Re)Engineering —The Big Picture.
2: Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments.
3: Methodology Overview: Planning and Modeling.

PART II: APPLICATION ENGINEERING: BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS.

4: Building New (Web-Based) Applications.
5: Enterprise Data Architectures.
6: Web-Based Application Software Architectures.
7: Implementation Concepts and Examples (Web, CORBA, ActiveX, DCE, Encina, PowerBuilder).

PART III: APPLICATION REENGINEERING: DEALING WITH LEGACIES.

8: Dealing with Legacy Applications: An Overview.
9: Access and Integration of Legacy Applications through the Web.
10: Data Warehouses.
11: Migration Strategies.

Intended Audience and Recommended Usage

This book is based on a synthesis of experience gained from three different sources. First, extensive project management, consulting, and system integration assignments in recent years in client/server systems, object-oriented technologies, Web-based applications, middleware evaluation, legacy data access, data warehousing, and data migration. Second, development and teaching of industrial training courses on client/server technologies and distributed systems that have been taught several times in the telecommunications industry and general IT community. Finally, teaching of graduate-level special topics courses in distributed systems for IT majors and computer-science students. This experience has indicated that this book should be useful as a reference for almost all IT managers and practitioners and also as a textbook for university courses and industrial training seminars. Specifically, this book should be of value to:


  • Architects and designers of information services (application designers, database designers, network designers).
  • Analysts and consultants of information technologies.
  • Planners of IT infrastructure and platforms.
  • Technical support personnel .
  • Managers of information technologies (CIO, MIS managers, database administrators, application development managers).
  • System integrators who combine databases, networks, and applications between different platforms.
  • Teachers of university courses in information technologies.
  • Technical trainers for professional development courses in information technology.
  • Researchers in computing and information technologies who need a broad coverage of the subject matter.
  • Students for an introduction to the subject matter with numerous references for additional studies.
    Depending on the background and interest of the reader, the book can be used in a variety of ways. This book has been, and can be, used in academic courses as well as in corporate training. Outlines of a university course and a two-day professional training course are suggested on the next page (the companion book “Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments ” is used as a reference book). These outlines are based on experience of teaching several university courses and industrial seminars in the last three years. Specifically:

    University Courses. This book can be used in the information systems concentration in business schools and industrial engineering departments at most universities. The courses, usually graduate level, have been attended by students from management, computer science and industrial engineering departments.

    Professional Seminars and Corporate Training. This book has been used as a foundation for a two-day professional seminar under the title “Building Web-Based Applications. ”


    University Course Outline: Distributed Application Systems
    Week: 1 Topic: Introduction Reading: Chapter 1 Week: 2 Topic: IT platforms (Web technologies) Reading: Chapter 2 Week: 3 Topic: Middleware Reading: Chapter 2 Week:4 Topic: OO Concepts Reading: Chapter 2 Week: 5 Topic: A General Methodology Reading: Chapter 3 Week: 6 Topic: Web-based applications Reading: Chapter 4 Week: 7 Topic: Enterprise Data Architectures Reading: Chapter 5 Week: 8 Topic: Midterm Examination (or Project 1 Due) Week: 9 Topic: Application Software Architectures Reading: Chapter 6 Week: 10 Topic: Implementation Examples and Concepts Reading: Chapter 7 Week: 11 Topic:Legacy applications: The challenge Reading: Chapter 8 Week: 12 Topic: Access and Integration through the Web Reading: Chapter 9 Week: 13 Topic: Data Warehouses Reading: Chapter 10 Week: 14 Topic: Migration Strategies Reading: Chapter 11 Week: 15 Topic: Final Examination (or Project 2 Due) Professional Training Course: Building Web-Based Applications Session: 1 Topic: Introduction Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 1 Session: 2 Topic: IT Building Blocks: The Middleware Duration: 2.0 Hours Reading: Chapter 2 Session: 3 Topic: Web and distributed objects Duration: 1.5 Hours Reading: Chapter 2 Session: 4 Topic: A General Methodology Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 3 Session: 5 Topic: Web-based applications Duration: 1.5 Hours Reading: Chapter 4 Session: 6 Topic: Data and Application Architectures Duration: 1.5 Hours Reading: Chapters 5, 6 Session: 7 Topic: Implementation Examples and Concepts Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 7 Session: 8 Topic: Legacy applications: The challenge Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 8 Session: 9 Topic: Access and Integration through the Web Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 9 Session: 10 Topic: Data Warehouses Duration: 0.5 Hour Reading: Chapter 10 Session: 11 Topic: Migration Strategies and wrapup Duration: 1.0 Hour Reading: Chapter 11 Acknowledgments

    Many of my colleagues and friends at Bellcore graciously agreed to review specific chapters for content and/or style. Here is an alphabetical list of the reviewers who commented on at least one chapter (some reviewed 4 to 5): Dr. Aloysius Cornelio, Prasad Ganti, Bret Gorsline, Dr. Jon Kettering, Tom Knoble, Frank Marchese, Dr. Paul Matthews, Mike Meiner, KJ Shah, and Dr. Gomer Thomas. I really feel fortunate to have access to so many experts who are also very nice folks.

    In addition, many of my university friends read early drafts and made numerous suggestions. Professor Nabil Adams of Rutgers Graduate School of Business, Professor Ahmed Elmagarmid of Purdue University, Professor Peter Jurkat of the Stevens Institute of Technology, and Professor Jerry Luftman of Stevens Institute of Technology gave valuable suggestions about different topics.

    I should not forget the contribution of many university students at Stevens Institute of Technology, Rutgers, and Fordham who “suffered ” through very rough drafts of many chapters. In addition, many attendees of professional-training seminars volunteered to review different chapters. The list of topics included in this book is based on extensive discussions with the university students and seminar attendees.

    I want to express my gratitude toward my management (Dr. Satish Thatte, Rich Jacowleff, and Jac Simensen) for their understanding and support.

    Conventions Used

    We will use the following conventions in this book. Highlighted italics are used to indicate definition of new terms, italics are used for emphasis and bold letters are used for subject headings.

    Interrelationships Between Books and Personal Remarks
    Several people, especially faculty members from different universities, in the past few months have asked me how this book relates with my first book Distributed Computing and Client/Server Systems (Prentice Hall, 1993) and how/why did I decide to write two companion books instead of one large one. The following discussion, somewhat anecdotal, should help.

    My first book covered a broad range of issues in distributed computing (networks, middle- ware, applications, and management issues). Due to the size (it exceeded 700 pages), I eliminated about 100 pages of application related topics from that book. During 1993 and 1994, I became involved in numerous application engineering/reengineering and IT infrastructure projects and wrote a few tutorials, as part of my practice, on emerging topics such as data warehouses, application architectures, distributed objects, and legacy data access. During a 1994 year-end conversation with my friend Paul Becker, a senior editor at Prentice Hall, we both concluded that the world could most certainly use another book by me that concentrated on the distributed application issues (the first book had only one chapter on this topic).

    I started developing the manuscript at the end of 1994 but soon found that I needed to explain many of the IT infrastructure components, especially the perplexing middleware, before delving into the applications issues. So I did. The end result was that the new book was huge (more than 800 pages with roughly half on middleware and the other half on applications). After several conversations with Paul Becker, we both decided to break the material into two companion books: one on middleware and the other on application (re)engineering. This seemed to be a good idea because distributed computing is a vast and rapidly evolving field and it is difficult to discuss everything in one book. The following table attempts to show the interrelationships between my three books in terms of the following building blocks of distributed computing:

    l Networks to provide the transport services in distributed computing environments l Middleware to enable the distributed applications l Applications to provide business value l Management and support issues to deal with administrative aspects of distributed computing Topics Discussed in Books on Distributed Computing
  • Topics “Distributed Computing and Client/ Server Systems ” (1993) “Object-Oriented Client/Server Internet Environments ” (1997) “Application (Re)Engineering: Building Web-based Applications and Dealing with Legacies ” (1997)
  • Networks Extensive coverage (6 chapters) Light coverage (1 chapter) No coverage Middleware Moderate coverage (3 chapters) Extensive coverage (9 chapters) Light coverage (1 chapter)
  • Applications Light coverage (1 chapter) No coverage Extensive coverage (10 chapters) Management and Support Moderate coverage (2 chapters) No coverage No coverage I received a great deal of help during this process from several people at Prentice Hall. Of particular note are Eileen Clark as the produc books, Maureen Diana as an administrative assistant and fire fighter, and Paul Becker as an overall “spiritual leader. ” Of course, my best friend and my wife, Dolorese, valiantly saw me through this undertaking. She has, as always, shown exceptional patience and tolerance for which I am greatly indebted to her. She continues to advise me and helps me in editing and preparing the material. It is a good example of teamwork.

Read More Show Less

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