Approaches to Group Work: A Handbook for Practitioners / Edition 1

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Overview

Intended as a supplement to a theoretical counseling book, this handbook presents twenty-three practical approaches to working with children, adolescents, and adults on such goals as making friends, succeeding in school, planning a career, and being a good parent. Taken together, these ideas will well equip future counselors to address a variety of issues in a wide range of settings. This book covers the standard presentation for each approach—Consisting of purpose statement, conceptual framework, goals, pre-screening and orientation, outline for eight sessions, evaluation experience, and referral/follow-up plans. For professionals in the field of counseling.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Twenty-three contributors, all but one members of a graduate student cohort in the counselor education program in the Graduate School of Education at Portland State University, present models for group facilitation created for specific age and interest groups, including groups for children with life-threatening illness, gifted adolescents, and single parents. Each model follows a standard plan consisting of a statement of purpose, conceptual framework, plans for pre-group screening, descriptions of eight group sessions, evaluation, and plans for referral and follow-up. Capuzzi is professor and coordinator of counselor education at Portland State University. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130907608
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 5/2/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 204
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

David Capuzzi, Ph.D., N.C.C., L.P.C., is a past president of the American Counseling Association (formerly the American Association for Counseling and Development) and is professor and coordinator of Counselor Education in the Graduate School of Education at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

A former editor of The School Counselor, Dr. Capuzzi has authored a number of textbook chapters and monographs on the topic of preventing adolescent suicide and is coeditor and author, with Dr. Larry Golden, of Helping Families Help Children: Family Interventions with School Related Problems and Preventing Adolescent Suicide. He co-authored and edited Youth at Risk: A Prevention Resource for Counselors, Teachers, and Parents; Introduction to the Counseling Profession; Introduction to Group Counseling and Counseling and Psychotherapy: Theories and Interventions with Douglas R. Gross. He has authored or co-authored articles in a number of ACA-related journals.

A frequent speaker and keynoter at professional conferences and institutes, Dr. Capuzzi has also consulted with a variety of school districts and community agencies interested in initiating prevention and intervention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. He has facilitated the development of suicide prevention, crisis management, and post intervention programs in communities throughout the United States; provides training on the topics of "youth at risk" and "grief and loss"; and serves as an invited adjunct faculty member at other universities as time permits. He is the first recipient of ACA's Kitty Cole Human Rights Award.

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Read an Excerpt

The role of a professional counselor calls for practitioners who have the knowledge and skills to assist clients as they strive to attain higher levels of self-understanding, problem solving, relationship building, and planning for the future. Counselors in school, community/mental health, hospital, private practice, rehabilitation, business and industry, and a variety of other agency settings are called upon to deliver a variety of services to a culturally diverse and challenging clientele comprising children, adolescents, and adults. In many instances, clients can be well served through the provision of task, psychoeducational, counseling, or psychotherapy groups. Counselors and therapists must master the basic knowledge and skill competencies needed to facilitate groups in order to meet the needs of a substantive segment of their clients served in particular settings and to obtain positions in those settings. Ability to do group work with clients is essential to beginning and experienced professionals committed to providing the constellation of services their clients deserve.

This handbook is unique in several ways. The 23 authors of the approaches to groups included in this resource are all residents of the Pacific Northwest. They represent a wide range of interests as well as expertise spanning a 40-year continuum from the beginning to the experienced professional. Except for one faculty contributor, all were members of a graduate student cohort in the counselor education program in the Graduate School of Education at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

The models for group facilitation presented in this handbook were created for implementation with specific age groups in either the work settings or proposed internship sites of the authors. Each author used the following paradigm to plan the group interventions described: statement of purpose, conceptual framework, goals for the group, plans for pre-group screening and orientation, descriptions for eight group sessions, evaluation of the group experience, and plans for referral and follow-up.

Even though no two professionals facilitate groups in exactly the same way, each author provides a thorough description of each of the eight sessions so that other practitioners can follow the same format. The purpose, theme, and materials needed for each session are addressed. In addition, each author described the "process" variables that should be taken into consideration to enhance the opportunity for participation by each member of the group and to focus the group experience in constructive and therapeutic ways. In all cases, it is also true that the interventions described probably exceed what could be accomplished in just eight sessions and that those using this resource will find that each group intervention could take considerably longer than eight sessions to complete. In part, this is based on a shared philosophy that it is better to "over plan and under use" so that the plan or format for the group does not begin to take precedence over the needs of group members during a given session.

Part 1 of this handbook describes approaches to group work with children, Part 2 describes approaches to group work with adolescents, and Part 3 describes approaches to group work with adults. This handbook can be used by graduate students in counselor education, psychology, and social work as a practical adjunct to a more theoretical text used in the process of preparing the group-work specialist.

In addition, Approaches to Group Work: A Handbook for Practitioners can also be helpful to professionals who have completed their graduate degrees and wish to continue developing the knowledge and skills base needed for the successful facilitation of groups.

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Table of Contents

PART ONE: GROUP WORK WITH CHILDREN.

1. Using the Arts in a Bereavement Group for Children.

2. Life-Threatening Illness in School-Age Children: A Transition Group.

3. Trust and Support: Children of Alcoholics Build Their Own Identities.

4. Friendship Groups: Make a Friend and Be a Friend.

5. Kids Helping Kids: A Group Training for Peer Helpers and Beyond.

PART TWO: GROUP WORK WITH ADOLESCENTS.

6. School Success Skills: A Group for At-Risk Students.

7. Moving to a New School: A Transition Group for Young Adolescents.

8. Peer Networking to Build Resiliency among High School Youth: A Violence Prevention Group.

9. TAG, I'm It: A Counseling Group for Talented and Gifted Adolescents.

10. Effective Communication for Conflict Situations.

11. Adolescents of Divorce: A School-Based Intervention.

12. High School Students Rediscovering Academic Success.

13. The Safe Survivors Group: A Psychoeducational Counseling Group for Adolescent Survivors of Relationship Violence.

PART THREE: GROUP WORK WITH ADULTS.

14. Planning Your Career Adventure: A Group for Career Planners.

15. Grieving Our Losses.

16. Simplify Your Life.

17. The Transition into Parenthood: A Group for Expecting Couples.

18. Using the Wheel of Self-Discovery: A Career Transition Tool.

19. Returning Women Students: A Transition Group.

20. Codependence Recovery for Adults Abused as Children.

21. A Positive Approach to Disciplining Your School-Aged Child.

22. Transitioning into Single Parenthood.

23. Systematic Desensitization for Specified Phobias.

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Preface

The role of a professional counselor calls for practitioners who have the knowledge and skills to assist clients as they strive to attain higher levels of self-understanding, problem solving, relationship building, and planning for the future. Counselors in school, community/mental health, hospital, private practice, rehabilitation, business and industry, and a variety of other agency settings are called upon to deliver a variety of services to a culturally diverse and challenging clientele comprising children, adolescents, and adults. In many instances, clients can be well served through the provision of task, psychoeducational, counseling, or psychotherapy groups. Counselors and therapists must master the basic knowledge and skill competencies needed to facilitate groups in order to meet the needs of a substantive segment of their clients served in particular settings and to obtain positions in those settings. Ability to do group work with clients is essential to beginning and experienced professionals committed to providing the constellation of services their clients deserve.

This handbook is unique in several ways. The 23 authors of the approaches to groups included in this resource are all residents of the Pacific Northwest. They represent a wide range of interests as well as expertise spanning a 40-year continuum from the beginning to the experienced professional. Except for one faculty contributor, all were members of a graduate student cohort in the counselor education program in the Graduate School of Education at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

The models for group facilitation presented in this handbook were created for implementation with specific age groups in either the work settings or proposed internship sites of the authors. Each author used the following paradigm to plan the group interventions described: statement of purpose, conceptual framework, goals for the group, plans for pre-group screening and orientation, descriptions for eight group sessions, evaluation of the group experience, and plans for referral and follow-up.

Even though no two professionals facilitate groups in exactly the same way, each author provides a thorough description of each of the eight sessions so that other practitioners can follow the same format. The purpose, theme, and materials needed for each session are addressed. In addition, each author described the "process" variables that should be taken into consideration to enhance the opportunity for participation by each member of the group and to focus the group experience in constructive and therapeutic ways. In all cases, it is also true that the interventions described probably exceed what could be accomplished in just eight sessions and that those using this resource will find that each group intervention could take considerably longer than eight sessions to complete. In part, this is based on a shared philosophy that it is better to "over plan and under use" so that the plan or format for the group does not begin to take precedence over the needs of group members during a given session.

Part 1 of this handbook describes approaches to group work with children, Part 2 describes approaches to group work with adolescents, and Part 3 describes approaches to group work with adults. This handbook can be used by graduate students in counselor education, psychology, and social work as a practical adjunct to a more theoretical text used in the process of preparing the group-work specialist.

In addition, Approaches to Group Work: A Handbook for Practitioners can also be helpful to professionals who have completed their graduate degrees and wish to continue developing the knowledge and skills base needed for the successful facilitation of groups.

Read More Show Less

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