Archaeological Theory: Who Sets the Agenda? / Edition 1

Archaeological Theory: Who Sets the Agenda? / Edition 1

by Norman Yoffee
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521449588

ISBN-13: 9780521449588

Pub. Date: 07/28/1993

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Since the l960s, archaeology has become increasingly taught in universities and practiced on a growing scale by national and local heritage agencies throughout the world. This book addresses the criticisms of postmodernist writers about archaeology's social role, and asserts its intellectual importance and achievements in discovering real facts about the human past

…  See more details below

Overview

Since the l960s, archaeology has become increasingly taught in universities and practiced on a growing scale by national and local heritage agencies throughout the world. This book addresses the criticisms of postmodernist writers about archaeology's social role, and asserts its intellectual importance and achievements in discovering real facts about the human past. It looks forward to the creation of a truly global consciousness of the origins of human societies and civilizations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521449588
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
07/28/1993
Series:
New Directions in Archaeology Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
152
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.31(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: The sources of archaeological theory Norman Yoffee, and Andrew Sherratt; Part I. The Social Context of Archaeological Theory: 1. Limits to a post-processual archaeology (or The dangers of a new scholasticism) Philip L. Kohl; 2. A proliferation of new archaeologists 'Beyond objectivism and relativism' Alison Wylie; 3. Ambition, deference, discrepancy, consumption; the intellectual background to a post-processual archaeology Christopher Chippendale; Part II. Archaeological Theory from the Paleolithic to the State: 4. Ancestors and agendas Clive Gamble; 5. After social evolution: a new archaeological agenda? Stephen Shennan; 6. Too many chiefs? (or, Safe texts for the 90s) Norman Yoffee; Part III. Case-Studies in Archaeological Theory and Practice; 7. When is a symbol archaeologically meaningful? Meaning, function and prehistoric visual arts Kelley Hays; 8. Re-fitting the 'cracked and broken facade': the case for empiricism in post-processual ethnoarchaeology Miriam Start; 9. Communication and the importance of disciplinary communities: who owns the past? Tim Murray; Part IV. Postscript and Epilogue: 10. The relativity of theory Andrew Sherratt; 11. Archaeology: the loss of nerve Richard Bradley.

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >