Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

Overview

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with "deep time," how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, edited by Eric Kansa, Sarah Whitcher Kansa, and Ethan Watrall.

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Overview

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with "deep time," how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, edited by Eric Kansa, Sarah Whitcher Kansa, and Ethan Watrall.

With contributions from a range of experts in archaeology and technology, this volume is organized around four key topics that illuminate how the revolution in communications technology reverberates across the discipline: approaches to information retrieval and information access; practical and theoretical concerns inherent in design choices for archaeology's computing infrastructure; collaboration through the development of new technologies that connect field-based researchers and specialists within an international archaeological community and scholarly communications issues, with an emphasis on concerns over sustainability and preservation imperatives.

This book not only describes practices that attempt to mitigate some of the problems associated with the Web, such as information overload and disinformation, it also presents compelling case studies of actual digital projects—many of which are rich in structured data and multimedia content or focused on generating content from the field "in real time," and all of which demonstrate how the Web can and is being used to transform archaeological communications into forms that are more open, inclusive, and participatory. Above all, this volume aims to share these experiences to provide useful guidance for other researchers interested in applying technology to archaeology.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781931745857
  • Publisher: The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press
  • Publication date: 1/15/2011
  • Series: Cotsen Digital Archaeology Series , #1
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric Kansa leads development of Open Context (http://opencontext.org), where he explores Web architecture, service design, and how these issues relate to the social and professional context of the digital humanities.

Sarah Whitcher Kansa is executive director of the Alexandria Archive Institute (http://alexandriaarchive.org), where she advocates for data sharing and publication in various archaeological and cultural heritage communities.

Ethan Watrall is an assistant professor of anthropology and associate director of Matrix: The Center for Humane Arts, Letters & Social Sciences Online (www.matrix.msu.edu) at Michigan State University.

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Table of Contents

List of Figures vii

List of Tables viii

Volume Editors ix

List of Contributors xi

Preface xiii

Acknowledgments xiv

Introduction: New Directions for the Digital Past Eric C. Kansa 1

Section I A Web of Archaeological Data: Infrastructure, Services, and Interoperability 27

Chapter 1 The Archaeology Data Service and the Archaeotools Project: Faceted Classification and Natural Language Processing Julian Richards Stuart Jeffrey Stewart Waller Fabio Ciravegna Sam Chapman Ziqi Zhang 31

Chapter 2 Toward a Do-It-Yourself Cyberinfrastructure: Open Data, Incentives, and Reducing Costs and Complexities of Data Sharing Eric C. Kansa Sarah Whitcher Kansa 57

Section II The Technical and Theoretical Context of Archaeology on the Web 93

Chapter 3 Poor Relatives or Favorite Uncles? Cyberinfrastructure and Web 2.0: A Critical Comparison for Archaeological Research Stuart Dunn 95

Chapter 4 Archaeological Knowledge Production and Dissemination in the Digital Age Robin Boast Peter Biehl 119

Section III Archaeological Data Management and Collaboration 157

Chapter 5 Creating a Virtual Research Environment for Archaeology Michael Rains 159

Chapter 6 iAKS: A Web 2.0 Archaeological Knowledge Management System Ethan Watrall 171

Chapter 7 User-Generated Content in Zoorachaeology: Exploring the "Middle Space" of Scholarly Communication Sarah Whitcher Kansa Francis Deblauwe 185

Section IV Sustainability, Quality, and Access 207

Chapter 8 UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology, Archaeological Data, and Web 2.0 Willeke Wendrich 211

Chapter 9 Open Access for Archaeological Literature: A Manager's Perspective Jingfeng Xia 233

Chapter 10 What Are Our Critical Data-Preservation Needs? Harrison Eiteljorg 251

Conclusion: Web 2.0 and Beyond, or On the Web, Nobody Knows You're an Archaeologist W. Fredrick Limp 265

Index 281

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