Archaeology in Situ: Sites, Archaeology, and Communities in Greece

Overview

This volume explores the ways local communities perceive, experience, and interact with archaeological sites in Greece, as well as with the archaeologists and government officials who construct and study such places. In so doing, it reveals another side to sites that have been revered as both birthplace of Western civilization and basis of the modern Greek nation. The conceptual terrain of those who live near such sites is complex and furrowed with ambivalence, confusion, and resentment. For many local residents,...
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Overview

This volume explores the ways local communities perceive, experience, and interact with archaeological sites in Greece, as well as with the archaeologists and government officials who construct and study such places. In so doing, it reveals another side to sites that have been revered as both birthplace of Western civilization and basis of the modern Greek nation. The conceptual terrain of those who live near such sites is complex and furrowed with ambivalence, confusion, and resentment. For many local residents, these sites are gated enclaves, unexplained and off limits, except when workers are needed.
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Editorial Reviews

Choice
This 500-page volume, written and edited in accord with high standards, contains 19 chapters written by a group of experienced Greek and US scholars. It provides abundant examples of how the physical evidence provided by archaeological investigations continues to alter perceptions of the Greek past....Summing Up: Recommended.
David Shankland
Archaeology in Situ is a brilliant series of case studies, highly focused and beautifully written. This volume is at the forefront of the most important series of changes in our disciplines for decades, an indispensable tool for the understanding of the shifting relationship between anthropology and archaeology and how we can work together. I recommend it for researchers and students alike—indeed to all those who are interested in archaeology and anthropology in the field, in what really is going on at the trowel's edge.
Jack L. Davis
Stroulia and Sutton ask, 'How can we expect local residents to care about sites if they have no stake in them?' Supported by well-documented contributions from some two dozen colleagues, Greek and non-Greek, they propose a thoughtful and innovative scheme for reaching 'some form of collaborative ownership or management, even of official sites' in Greece. The result is an important case study that must be of interest to all archaeologists. Bridging the chasm that exists between archaeological sites and the people who live near them is crucial. How else can we hope to create sustainable heritage management plans but by working to build a bridge between the past and present?
CHOICE
This 500-page volume, written and edited in accord with high standards, contains 19 chapters written by a group of experienced Greek and US scholars. It provides abundant examples of how the physical evidence provided by archaeological investigations continues to alter perceptions of the Greek past....Summing Up: Recommended.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Anna Stroulia teaches for the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at the University of Southern Indiana. She is the author of Flexible Stones: Ground Stone Tools from Franchthi Cave. Susan Buck Sutton is associate vice president of international affairs and professor of anthropology at Indiana University. She is editor of Contingent Countryside: Settlement, Economy and Land Use in the Southern Argolid Since 1700.
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Table of Contents

Part 1 Part I. Introduction Chapter 2 Chapter 1. Archaeological Sites and the Chasm between Past and Present Part 3 Part II. Tales of Sites and Communities Chapter 4 Chapter 2. On the Shoulders of Hera: Alternative Readings of Antiquity in the Greek Memoryscape Chapter 5 Chapter 3. "Writing down the Country": Travelers and the Emergence of the Archaeological Gaze Chapter 6 Chapter 4. Herakles Unbound: Stories of Antiquity and Modernity in the Nemea Valley Chapter 7 Chapter 5. Between the Local and the Global: The Athenian Acropolis as both National and World Monument Chapter 8 Chapter 6. Producing and Consuming Pictures: Representations of a Landscape Chapter 9 Chapter 7. Immanent or Eminent Domain? The Contest over Thessaloniki's Rotonda Chapter 10 Chapter 8. Material Memory and Politics: An Approach to the "Destruction" of the Architectural Past of Thessaloniki in the Twentieth Century Chapter 11 Chapter 9. The Cyclops, the Sultan, and the Empty Post: Sites and Histories in Turkish(Re)appropriations of the Thracian Past Chapter 12 Chapter 10. The Making of an Historic Site: An Exercise in Knowledge and Localism Chapter 13 Chapter 11. Between the Village and the Site: A Conversation on Conflict and Partnership Chapter 14 Chapter 12. "Between Mud and Poetry:" Archaeology in the Local Market Chapter 15 Chapter 13. Seeing Voices and Changing Relationships: Film, Archaeological Reporting, and the Landscape of People in Sphakia Chapter 16 Chapter 14. A Stratigraphy of Meanings: Integrating Antiquities into Daily Life at Paroikia, Paros Chapter 17 Chapter 15. From Franchthi Cave to Kilada: Reflections on a Long and Winding Road Part 18 Part III. Commentaries Chapter 19 Chapter 16. Archaeologies in Situ, Situated Archaeologies Chapter 20 Chapter 17. There is a Blue Elephant in the Room: From State Institutions to Citizen Indifference Chapter 21 Chapter 18. Situating Theory: Dynamics of Condescension and Reciprocity in the Material Shadow of the Past Chapter 22 Chapter 19. Archaeology through the Lens of the Local
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