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Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries
     

Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries

4.1 47
by Robert Goldsborough
 

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Winner of the Lovey Award for Best Historical Novel: This award-winning mystery reveals how Archie Goodwin joined forces with famed private detective Nero Wolfe and launched a literary legend.

In 1930, young Archie Goodwin comes to New York City hoping for a bit of excitement. In his third week working as a night watchman, he stops two

Overview


Winner of the Lovey Award for Best Historical Novel: This award-winning mystery reveals how Archie Goodwin joined forces with famed private detective Nero Wolfe and launched a literary legend.

In 1930, young Archie Goodwin comes to New York City hoping for a bit of excitement. In his third week working as a night watchman, he stops two burglars in their tracks—with a pair of hot lead slugs.
 
Dismissed from his job for being “trigger-happy,” he parlays his newfound notoriety into a job as a detective’s assistant, helping honest sleuth Del Bascom solve cases like the Morningside Piano Heist, the Rive Gauche Art Gallery Swindle, and the Sumner-Hayes Burglary. But it’s the kidnapping of Tommie Williamson, the son of a New York hotel magnate, that introduces Goodwin to the man who will change his life.
 
Goodwin knows there’s only one detective who can help find Tommie: Nero Wolfe, the stout genius of West Thirty-Fifth Street. Together, they’ll form one of the most unlikely crime fighting duos in history—but first Goodwin must locate Tommie and prove that he deserves a place by Wolfe’s side.
 
In this witty story about the origin of a legendary partnership, Robert Goldsborough gloriously evokes the spirit of Nero Wolfe’s creator, bestselling author Rex Stout, and breathes new life into his beloved characters. 
 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Set in 1923, Goldsborough’s excellent eighth pastiche to recreate Rex Stout’s iconic characters (after 1994’s The Missing Chapter) showcases his improved ability to recreate the smart-alecky voice of Archie Goodwin, the more-than-Watsonian sidekick to the quintessential armchair detective. Goldsborough fleshes out passing references to Archie’s background in Stout’s originals, and succeeds in presenting a much more callow figure than the familiar accomplished PI. The 19-year-old, newly arrived in New York City from Ohio, has taken a job guarding the Moreland Import Company docks that soon turns deadly. In self-defense, Archie guns down two would-be thieves and loses his job as a result. He later landswith a detective agency, whose proprietor, Del Bascom, hooks Archie up with his future boss after Wolfe brings in Bascom on a kidnapping case. Goldsborough hits nary a false note, an impressive achievement that will cause devotees to hope he won’t wait another 18 years before his next Goodwin and Wolfe adventure. Agent: Erik Simon, the Martha Kaplan Agency. (Nov.)
From the Publisher

“Archie and Nero Wolfe fans rejoice! Robert Goldsborough, who so deftly and ably continued the Wolfe series a few years back, has returned to tell the story every fan wanted to hear: the origin of the Wolfe/Goodwin partnership. This book has a hardboiled sheen worthy of the period it recreates and captures Stout’s recurring characters—not just Archie and Wolfe—with a fidelity that is damn near supernatural. And Archie’s voice and Wolfe’s grand demeanor are spot on. Here’s hoping Goldsborough finds a dozen more untold cases as he channels the great Rex Stout.” —Max Allan Collins, author of Bye Bye, Baby
 
“Devotees of the late Rex Stout’s bestsellers will be pleasantly surprised.” —Publishers Weekly
 
“Robert Goldsborough brings Nero Wolfe, late of Rex Stout, gloriously back to life.” —Chicago
 
“Mr. Goldsborough has all of the late writer’s stylistic mannerisms down pat.” —The New York Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453270974
Publisher:
Open Road Integrated Media LLC
Publication date:
11/13/2012
Series:
Nero Wolfe Series
Pages:
234
Sales rank:
177,662
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt

H. P. LOVECRAFT is one of the seminal horror authors of the twentieth century. He wrote more than one hundred stories, and achieved popular acclaim in such publications as Astounding Stories and Weird Tales. Though he died in 1937, the small press publisher Arkham House was established in 1939 to preserve Lovecraft’s works for future generations

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
“Archie and Nero Wolfe fans rejoice! Robert Goldsborough, who so deftly and ably continued the Wolfe series a few years back, has returned to tell the story every fan wanted to hear: the origin of the Wolfe/Goodwin partnership. This book has a hardboiled sheen worthy of the period it recreates and captures Stout’s recurring characters—not just Archie and Wolfe—with a fidelity that is damn near supernatural. And Archie’s voice and Wolfe’s grand demeanor are spot on. Here’s hoping Goldsborough finds a dozen more untold cases as he channels the great Rex Stout.” —Max Allan Collins, author of Bye Bye, Baby “Devotees of the late Rex Stout’s bestsellers will be pleasantly surprised.” —Publishers Weekly “Robert Goldsborough brings Nero Wolfe, late of Rex Stout, gloriously back to life.” —Chicago  “Mr. Goldsborough has all of the late writer’s stylistic mannerisms down pat.” —The New York Times

Meet the Author


Robert Goldsborough (b. 1937) is an American author best known for continuing Rex Stout’s famous Nero Wolfe series. Born in Chicago, he attended Northwestern University and upon graduation went to work for the Associated Press, beginning a lifelong career in journalism that would include long periods at the Chicago Tribune and Advertising Age.
While at the Tribune, Goldsborough began writing mysteries in the voice of Rex Stout, the creator of iconic sleuths Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin. Goldsborough’s first novel starring Wolfe, Murder in E Minor (1986), was met with acclaim from both critics and devoted fans, winning a Nero Award from the Wolfe Pack. Nine more Wolfe mysteries followed, including Death on Deadline (1987) and Fade to Black (1990). His most recent book is Archie in the Crosshairs (2015).
 

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Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a long-time fan of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe books and a skeptic about continuing a series after an author's death, I'm delighted that Robert Goldsborough did an excellent job with this book, introducing us to Archie Goodwin and Archie to Nero Wolfe. The voices of all the characters were authentic, as were the setting, plot, and pace. A winner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading all the Nero Wolfe novels it was a real treat to dip back in time and see how Wolfe and Archie met along with the rest of the characters that populate Rex Stout's stories.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In this novel Archie has moved to NY city and is starting to become the snappy, quick-witted persona we know and love today. He gets brought in on a case by a small time detective and Nero Wolfe is so impressed with him he eventually recieves a full time job. I loved this book. It incorporated significant details from most of Rex Stouts novel. It's the one book I wish Stout had written. It was well done. Congrats.
R_Hinshaw More than 1 year ago
This collection contains three Nero Wolfe short stories originally published in ‘The American Magazine’ in 1952 or 1953.  If you are a Nero Wolfe completist like me, this one is well worth your time.  If you are new to this, I recommend starting elsewhere; maybe with ‘The Silent Speaker’ (perhaps my favorite of the Wolfe novels I have read) or at the beginning with ‘Fer-de-lance’.  And of course, if you haven’t seen any of the early 2000s TV series that A&E produced starring Timothy Hutton and Maury Chaykin, you have to seek it out as it succeeds in capturing the flavor of the books.  In “Invitation to Murder”, Archie Goodwin goes to work a job that doesn’t initially appear to be worthy of Nero Wolfe’s time and talent.  When the client turns up dead, Archie hilariously enacts a ruse to lure Wolfe to the scene (rather than call the police).  I enjoyed this one quite a bit. “The Zero Clue” was my least favorite of the three.  It has a great set up, with Archie paying a visit to a potential client against Wolfe’s instructions.  When Archie finds the man’s office empty, he leaves, having no reason to suspect the man’s dead body was in the closet.  When Inspector Cramer learns from the doorman and other witnesses that Archie was there, he shows up at Wolfe’s Brownstone and refuses to believe Wolfe knows nothing about the murder.  In my opinion, this story bogs down somewhat while Wolfe questions the other suspects searching for information that will make some sense of the math-based clue the victim left on his desk. “This Won’t Kill” finds Wolfe’s sense of hospitality obligating him to accompany a guest, the owner of a prestigious restaurant, to game 7 of the World Series.  While the hometown Giants are getting beaten badly, it is discovered that four of their players were drugged and another is missing.  This is one of my favorite of the Nero Wolfe short stories, as it finds Wolfe and Archie pursuing separate lines; for once either could potentially have solved the mystery without the other.  As the story was first published in September of 1952, I suppose that in the fictional universe of the stories (spoiler alert) the Boston Red Sox win the World Series circa 1951
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all of Rex Stouts books and this book fits in well
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As both a Rex Stout & a Nero Wolfe fan, I loved it! Robert Goldsborough did an excellent job. A prequel was a brilliant idea & I loved how he included all the regular players. It was like hanging out with old friends!
momm3SM More than 1 year ago
this novel is well done and definitely in the Rex Stout style we have all come to know. Goldsborough takes incidents and people mentioned through out the Wolfe canon and weaves it into a great mystery! I don't often say this....but I could not put it down! Enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are moments when the "voice" does not seem to be Archie's, but they are few. The story is clever and engaging. Most importantly, the overall ending is, as Wolfe would say: very satisfactory.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Great Depression started in 1989. Fer-de-Lance is set in 1933 and that is specifically plot relevant. Archie has been working for Wolfe for 10 years. So the first 10 pages are already wrong. Several other established facts are also messed up in this story. Also, Archie Goodwin's dialogue should not fit in the mouth of Naruto Uzumaki. They think very differently. Also, Nero Wolfe does not rise from his chair, stand by his desk, and anxiously wish the departing minions well. Cramer does not pass up easy ways to arrest Wolfe. Nobody acts or speaks with the rhythms established in the series!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thoroughly enjoyed this! Great job of keeping the characters true to Rex Stout
BobK42 More than 1 year ago
For anyone who has enjoyed Nero Wolfe mysteries over the years, this is a book for you. the title tells it all. Check it out.
DDJTJ More than 1 year ago
TRULY EXCELLENT!!  Robert Goldsborough has done it again he has brought Archie Goodwin, Nero Wolfe & all their friends (and not so much friends) back to life.  ARCHIE MEETS NERO WOLFE A PREQUEL introduces us to a very very young Archie Goodwin, 19 years old to be exact.  He has just moved to New York City from Ohio looking for a change, and boy does he get a change!   Mr.Goldsborough has written seven other Nero Wolfe books in the past and I have read and reread them all. He has truly brought Archie and Nero Wolfe back to life with all the style, grace and depth of characters Rex Stout created and wrote about for years.  If you are (or were) a Rex Stout fan you MUST read ARCHIE MEETS NERO WOLFE A PREQUEL
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kagura's eyes scanned the darkness for the figure that was most likely long gone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writer has written a wonderful prequel that smoothly transitions the story of Archie Goodwin from new to New York City to the beginning of his career and life with Nero Wolf and company! I would highly recommend this and his other books to any fan of the Nero Wolf series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Um im here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MARCH 14TH AT 5:00PM SHARP!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Patarma6 More than 1 year ago
This is a nice prequel to the classic tales about Nero Wolfe that adds a nice touch of depth to Archie Goodwin. I also adds good background to others of the PI cadre that Wolfe calls on from time to time. A must for the Nero Wolfe aficionados.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you liked the Nero Wolfe series you will enjoy this book. It took me back 30/40 years. It is an easy read. It was fun to see Archie as a very young man and revisit several other favorite (and not so favorite) characters. I am looking forward to reading more books in this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not Archie or Nero Wolfe, just bland, boring imitations. The plot was good, but everything else a disappointment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
His books keep to the style of writing and to the plots of stout. he has his own series too so you can see his own style. This doesnt include saying how many brothers and sisters he had In too many women nor does it say where the orchid man eats as no mention of him sharing a meal or in the kitchen. In stout one book archie is said to write books like watson and a houseman is never mention again maybe the editors forgot and he didnt include it how he brings them ageless into the computer age is a good way to go rather like christie who does age a few of her characters
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
[ Leon cut himself. O.e ] <p> "Oh." He replied softly.