Architect

Architect

4.4 12
by Keith Russell Ablow
     
 

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Early Praise for The Architect:
"Keith Ablow's The Architect is original, well written, and very suspenseful. West Crosse is a complex, unforgettable bad guy. " - James Patterson, New York Times Bestselling author of Cat and Mouse
"A compelling story about passion and intelligence, and when faced with extreme decisions, how fine is the razor's edge

Overview

Early Praise for The Architect:
"Keith Ablow's The Architect is original, well written, and very suspenseful. West Crosse is a complex, unforgettable bad guy. " - James Patterson, New York Times Bestselling author of Cat and Mouse
"A compelling story about passion and intelligence, and when faced with extreme decisions, how fine is the razor's edge between sanity and madness. " --Anne Perry, New York Times Bestselling author of No Graves Yet
For Murder Suicide:
"This reviewer inhaled Keith Ablow's Murder Suicide...its elaborately plotted story is a corker...Ablow explores how human emotions can enhance or destroy the creative process." USA Today
"It appears Ablow's also been channeling another reverd master of murer most foul: Agatha Cristie. The elegantly complicated forensic psychiatrist Dr. Frank Clevenger is stilll front and center...It's enough to make Miss Marple proud."-Entertainment Weekly
For Psychopath:
"You can see why in certain quarters, in hopeful whispers, Ablow is compared to Thomas Harris . . . "-Entertainment Weekly
"Keith Ablow is king of the psychological thriller. ... Ablow writes like a man possessed - with a pace so blistering the pages will all but singe your hands." --Dennis Lehane, author of Mystic River

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
The strong fifth entry in Ablow's well-received series about FBI forensic psychologist Frank Clevenger (after 2003's Psychopath) features an impressive and sharply detailed heavy, architect West Crosse, who's hailed as a genius for his design skills. But underneath Crosse's art lies a dark soul, a man who wants to engineer human beings to match his perfect buildings at any cost. When a link surfaces among several bodies, each dissected with a brilliant surgeon's skills, Clevenger gets on the case. Crosse, who gave himself a jagged facial scar at age 20 to deliberately spoil his perfect beauty, is now 38. He shocks prospective clients with his opinions ("This is Walter Gropius's house.... It has nothing to do with you," he tells a magnate who proudly inhabits a home designed by the legendary German) and seems not to care if he gets any more work. As for Clevenger, he of course has some personal problems of his own. But Ablow manages to keep them from taking over the story and-miracle of miracles-focuses on the serial killer, that too often poorly drawn staple of so many psychological thrillers, who emerges as a fresh and fully realized creation. Agent, Beth Vesel. (July 22) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An architect catering to the spectacularly well-connected extends his services to the permanent removal of family aesthetic problems. Anaesthetics and Yale's top secret society figure heavily. Ablow sets his recurring alcoholic FBI psychiatrist Frank Clevenger (Murder Suicide, 2004, etc.) to the task of identifying the culprit behind a string of spectacularly revolting murders. The modus operandi of the fiend (revealed early on as a brilliant architect West Crosse) is to first chloroform, then to lethally inject his victim and, for rather hazy reasons, dissects one of the victim's body parts. In hotel rooms. On plastic sheets. With special silver pins. Clevenger's detective work is complicated both by what appears to be a conspiracy of silence among the families of the victims and by his own long list of personal problems. The latter include the son Clevenger adopted to save himself from a life of crime-though that seems to be his fate; the FBI associate girlfriend who runs hot and cold; and Clevenger's unsuccessful battle to stay off the bottle. Juggling the domestic woes and gobbling Antabuse (makes liquor disgusting), Clevenger interviews the victims' wealthy families and finds that they're united by their employment of an architect whose identity they will not reveal, by their relief at having the victims removed from their lives and by their ties to Yale and its notorious Skull and Bones. And-say! Isn't the president . . . ? Indeed he is. And his wife has just called in architect Crosse to come up with the first major addition to the White House since the Truman revamp. Oh, no! What if the president has a family problem!? Like, maybe, an unwed daughter who has just gotten pregnant?You don't suppose. . . !A thriller for those whose lives were ruined, just ruined, by the Kerry loss.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786282432
Publisher:
Gale Group
Publication date:
01/28/2006
Edition description:
REV Large Print
Pages:
447
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Keith Ablow received his medical degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and completed his psychiatric residence at New England Medical Center in Boston. A forensic psychiatrist, he serves as an expert witness in legal cases involving violence and has evaluated and treated murderers, gang members and sexual offenders for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. His essays on psychiatry and society have appeared in the Baltimore Sun, the Boston Herald, Discover, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report and the Washington Post. He is the author of several works of nonfiction and of the novels Denial, Projection and Compulsion, and Psychopath. Ablow lives in the Boston area.

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Architect 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
bw99 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this eBook, this is one of the authors I follow. However, the presentation for this eBook was terrible. A simple spellcheck of the scanned copy would have eliminated about 90 percent of the numerous typos, misspacings and other grammatical errors I found. I could understand the text, but it made it difficult to read. Come on,BN, you can do better.
harstan More than 1 year ago
He is one of the most brilliant architects the world has ever known, a virtuoso who believes that he knows what would suit the client more than the client does. He is not listed in any phone book and most people have never heard of him. He was a member of the secret society known as the Order of Skull and Bones and gets his referrals from them through word of mouth. His talent is such that he was picked to design a new museum in the White House because the president was also a member of the secret society and trusts him implicitly. --- However, this fine architect, believing he has God¿s blessing, is also a cold blooded murderer who kills a person from his client¿s family when the victim makes the lives of their relatives miserable. Forensic psychiatrist Frank Clevenger is called in to profile this serial killer. Frank also tries to help his troubled son Billy who looks like he is going to be serving time as he battles his drinking and drug problem. --- West Crosse is one of the most sinister villains since Hannibal Lechter. What makes him so frightening is he believes he has a calling to kill those who destroy the perfection of a family and is rational enough to know that if he kills his last victim, he will die almost immediately. Frank is also at his best with his own demons and second guessing himself so he comes across as the more realistic character, one that elicits sympathy from the reader. Keith Abbot has once again shown that he is the master of the psychological thriller. --- Harriet Klausner
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TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Ablow's Frank Clevenger series began with an appearance by this forensic psychologist back in 1998 in Denial. In every subsequent book, we get a great thriller story interspersed with Clevenger's own personal trials, and THE ARCHITECT is no different.

The main storyline of this book, that of an architect who believes he's doing God's work by reshaping the lives of the people he builds houses for, is definitely overshadowed by the story of Clevenger himself. His own battle with alcoholism (reminiscent of that of Lawrence Block's Matthew Scudder), his on-again-off-again very realistic relationship with his FBI girlfriend, and the tightrope he walks with his adopted son, Billy, take front row.

Although the bad guy in this book keeps the story fresh and the plot intense, to me it was the underlying story of Clevenger and his life that held my real interest. I was left at the last page not with the feeling of "good, the bad guy is dead," but that of "what's going to happen to Billy?"

I guess you could say I'm hooked.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ablow's Frank Clevenger series began with an appearance by this forensic psychologist back in 1998 in Denial. In every subsequent book, we get a great thriller story interspersed with Clevenger's own personal trials, and THE ARCHITECT is no different. The main storyline of this book, that of an architect who believes he's doing God's work by reshaping the lives of the people he builds houses for, is definitely overshadowed by the story of Clevenger himself. His own battle with alcoholism (reminiscent of that of Lawrence Block's Matthew Scudder), his on-again-off-again very realistic relationship with his FBI girlfriend, and the tightrope he walks with his adopted son, Billy, take front row. Although the bad guy in this book keeps the story fresh and the plot intense, to me it was the underlying story of Clevenger and his life that held my real interest. I was left at the last page not with the feeling of 'good, the bad guy is dead,' but that of 'what's going to happen to Billy?' I guess you could say I'm hooked.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed feeling Clevenger's pain throughout the book. i was able to relate to him on a more personal level becuase as a regular person, i have some of the same thoughts he has. in between each intense scene you were thrown from page to page with details leading to the next detailed 'work of art'
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book seemed promising for a thrilling reading experience. It was a good story but it should have had more depth and discription. It seemed a little to basic to be a thriller but I would consider it a good read.