Architecture and Design in Europe and America, 1750-2000 / Edition 1

Architecture and Design in Europe and America, 1750-2000 / Edition 1

by Abigail Harrison-Moore
     
 

ISBN-10: 1405115319

ISBN-13: 9781405115315

Pub. Date: 05/28/2006

Publisher: Wiley

Architecture and Design in Europe and America, 1750-2000 is an unprecedented teaching anthology that surveys the history of European and American architecture and design using both historical and contemporary sources.

  • Brings together the best scholarship on the subject, creating a new canon for teaching purposes by introducing a

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Overview

Architecture and Design in Europe and America, 1750-2000 is an unprecedented teaching anthology that surveys the history of European and American architecture and design using both historical and contemporary sources.

  • Brings together the best scholarship on the subject, creating a new canon for teaching purposes by introducing a thematic approach.
  • Covers three major periods, from 1750-1830, from 1830-1910, and from 1910-2000, with substantial introductions by the editors.
  • Pairs primary documents with well-known historiographical essays - along with some key but under-represented works.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405115315
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
05/28/2006
Series:
Blackwell Anthologies in Art History Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
544
Product dimensions:
6.65(w) x 9.65(h) x 1.15(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements.

List of illustrations.

Introduction: Dorothy C. Rowe and Abigail Harrison Moore.

i. The Architectural Plates from L’Encylopédie.

Denis Diderot (ed.) (1751-1780).

ii. ‘The Plates of the Encyclopedia’ (1964).

Roland Barthes.

iii. Introduction’ from The Archaeology of Knowledge (1969).

Michel Foucault.

Part I: Knowledge, Taste and Sublimity, c.1750-1830.

Introduction: Abigail Harrison Moore.

1. Palladian Permeation: The Villa: John Summerson.

2. The Country House: Form, Function and Meaning: Dana Arnold.

3. Plans and elevations for the villa of Lord Mansfield at Kenwood (illustration): Robert and James Adam.

4. Lectures on Architecture: Sir John Soane.

5. Extracts from A Description of the Villa: Horace Walpole.

6. Thomas Jefferson: James Ackerman.

7. A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful: Edmund Burke.

8. On Architecture and Buildings: Uvedale Price.

9. An Analytical Inquiry into the Principles of Taste: Richard Payne Knight.

10. Introduction: Iconography and Landscape: Stephen Daniels and Denis Cosgrove.

11. The Plates and Elevations of John Nash: John Summerson.

12. Architecture, Essay on Art: Etienne-Louis Boullée.

13. The Sphere: Reading a gender Metaphor in the architecture of modern cults of identity: Suzanne von Falkenhausen.

14. Karl Friedrich Schinkel: David Watkin and Tilman Mellinghoff.

15. Reading Architectural Herstories, The Disourses of Gender: Dana Arnold.

Part II: Urbanism, Reform and Revival c.1830-1910.

Introduction: Abigail Harrison Moore and Dorothy C. Rowe.

16. From Contrasts.

The City in 1440 and The City in 1840 (illustration).

17. An Apology for a work entitled Contrasts: A.W.N. Pugin.

18. Lecture X: Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc.

19. Science, Industry, and Art: Gottfried Semper.

20. The Age of Gothic: John Ruskin.

21. The Revival of Architecture: William Morris.

22. G, Some Recent Designs by Mr. Voysey.

23. Style: Louis Sullivan.

24. Ornament in Architecture: Louis Sullivan.

25. The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered: Louis Sullivan.

26. Plasticity: Frank Lloyd Wright.

27. The Nature of Materials: Frank Lloyd Wright.

28. Fire Proof House: Mary Lucy Mahony Griffin.

29. Women Architects: Lynne Walker.

30. The programmes of the architectural section of the École des Beaux-Arts, 1819-1914: Annie Jacques.

31. Adler and Sullivan at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago: Zeynep Çelik.

32. Public Parks and the Enlargement of Towns: Frederick Law Olmsted.

33. Chapter 6 Paris as the Hub of French Industrialisation: Building a European Capital Under the Second Empire 1852-70: Anthony Sutcliffe.

34. Introduction and Chapter I: The Town-Country Magnet: Ebenezer Howard.

35. Chapter VIII: The Meager and Unimaginative Character of Modern City Plans and Chapter IX ‘Modern Systems: Camillo Sitte.

36. Construction: Otto Wagner.

Part III: Architecture For Tomorrow c.1910-2000.

Introduction: Dorothy C. Rowe.

37. “Ornament and Crime” and “Architecture”: Adolf Loos.

38. Manifesto of Futurist Architecture: Antonio Sant’Elia.

39. The Turbine Hall of the AEG: Peter Behrens.

40. The State of German Architecture: Sigfried Giedion.

41. Programme of the Staatliche Bauhaus in Weimar: Walter Gropius.

42. Letter to the younger generation: Marianne Brandt.

43. Chapter IV: Space (architecture): László Moholy-Nagy.

44. “Where do we Stand” Lecture delivered in Zurich, Switzerland.

Marcel Breuer.

45. The Years in Berlin, 1919-1933 and extracts from chapter 2 Eric Mendelsohn.

46. Solved Problems: A Demand on Our Building Methods and Explanation of the Educational Program: Mies van der Rohe.

47. Report of the De Stijl Group at the International Artists’ Congress in Düsseldorf: Theo van Doesburg.

48. Towards a New Architecture: Le Corbusier.

49. Architecture in everything, City Planning in Everything: Le Corbusier.

50. On discovering Gaudi’s Architecture: Le Corbusier.

51. The Split Wall: Domestic Voyeurism: Beatriz Colomina.

52. Nine Points on Monumentality: José Luis Sert, Fernand Léger and Sigfried Giedion.

53. Monumentality: Louis I. Khan.

54. Reaffirmation of the Aims of CIAM.

55. Introduction – The Machine Age and Conclusion: Functionalism and technology: Reyner Banham.

56. The Death of Modern Architecture: Charles Jencks.

57. Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance: Kenneth Frampton.

58. The Pleasure of Architecture: Bernard Tschumi.

59. Scale and Span in a Global Digital World: Saskia Sassen.

Bibliography.

Index

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