Architecture and Film

Overview

Architecture and Film looks at the ways architecture and architects are treated on screen and, conversely, how these depictions filter and shape the ways we understand the built environment. It also examines the significant effect that the film industry has had on the American public's perception of urban, suburban, and rural spaces. Contributors to this collection of essays come from a wide range of disciplines. Nancy Levinson from Harvard Design Magazine writes on how films from The Fountainhead to Jungle Fever...

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Architecture and Film

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Overview

Architecture and Film looks at the ways architecture and architects are treated on screen and, conversely, how these depictions filter and shape the ways we understand the built environment. It also examines the significant effect that the film industry has had on the American public's perception of urban, suburban, and rural spaces. Contributors to this collection of essays come from a wide range of disciplines. Nancy Levinson from Harvard Design Magazine writes on how films from The Fountainhead to Jungle Fever have depicted architects. Eric Rosenberg from Tufts University looks at how architecture and spatial relations shape the Beatles films A Hard Day's Night, Help!, and Let It Be. Joseph Rosa, curator at the National Building Museum, discusses why modern domestic architecture in recent Hollywood films such as The Ice Storm, L.A. Confidential, and The Big Lebowski has become synonymous with unstable inhabitants. I.D. Magazine writer Peter Hall discusses the history of film titling, focusing on the groundbreaking work of Saul Bass and Maurice Binder. Editor Mark Lamster examines the anti-urbanism of the Star Wars trilogy. The collection also includes the voices of those from within the film industry, who are uniquely able to provide a "behind the scenes" perspective: film editor Bob Eisenhardt comments on the making of Concert of Wills, a documentary on the construction of the Getty Museum; and Robert Kraft focuses on his work as a location director for Diane Keaton's upcoming film about Los Angeles. Also included are interviews with David Rockwell, architect of numerous Planet Hollywood restaurants worldwide and designer of a new hall to host the Academy Awards ceremony; Kyle Kooper, who created title sequences for Seven and Mission Impossible; and motion picture art director Jan Roelfs, whose credits include Gattaca, Orlando, and Little Women.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
This examination of the way architecture and architects have been portrayed on the screen provides fourteen essays which analyze selected productions. Their authors are set designers, architects, and film producers who use their backgrounds to analyze the presence and importance of architectural props in film production.
Ann Marie Carroll
Some of the book's most intriguing essaysoffer coveted glimpses into the movie-making process and reveal the intense dedication to detail practiced by art director, location managers and set designers...Engaging and smart, each essay in Architecture and Film offers a unique perspective on architects, architecture and thefilms that bring them together.
I.D. Magazine
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781568982076
  • Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
  • Publication date: 6/1/2000
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
Pt. I Architects on Screen
Tall Buildings, Tall Tales: On Architects in the Movies 11
Who Built Mr. Blandings' Dream House? 49
Building a Film: Making Concert of Wills 89
Pt. II Behind the Scenes
Cedric Gibbons: Architect of Hollywood's Golden Age 101
Dr. Caligari's Cabinets: The Set Design of Ken Adam 117
Opening Ceremonies: Typography and the Movies, 1955-1969 129
Only in Hollywood: Confessions of a Location Manager 141
Escape by Design 149
Tearing Down the House: Modern Homes in the Movies 159
Pt. III Visions of the World
Architecture in a Mode of Distraction: Eight Takes on Jacques Tati's Playtime 171
The Consuming Landscape: Architecture in the Films of Michelangelo Antonioni 197
Shadows in the Hinterland: Rural Noir 217
Wretched Hives: George Lucas and the Ambivalent Urbanism of Star Wars 231
Bursting at the Seams: Architecture and the Films of the Beatles 241
Acknowledgments 251
Contributors 253
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