Architecture and Interpretation: Essays for Eric Fernie

Overview

Architecture affects us on a number of levels. It can control our movements, change our experience of our own scale, create a particular sense of place, focus memory, and act as a statement of power and taste, to name but a few. Yet the ways in which these effects are brought about are not yet well understood. The aim of this book is to move the discussion forward, to encourage and broaden debate about the ways in which architecture is interpreted, with a view to raising levels of intellectual engagement with the...

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Overview

Architecture affects us on a number of levels. It can control our movements, change our experience of our own scale, create a particular sense of place, focus memory, and act as a statement of power and taste, to name but a few. Yet the ways in which these effects are brought about are not yet well understood. The aim of this book is to move the discussion forward, to encourage and broaden debate about the ways in which architecture is interpreted, with a view to raising levels of intellectual engagement with the issues in terms of the theory and practice of architectural history. The range of material covered extends from houses constructed from mammoth bones around 15,000 years ago in the present-day Ukraine to a surfer's memorial in Carpinteria, California; other subjects include the young Michelangelo seeking to transcend genre boundaries; medieval masons' tombs; and the mythographies of early modern Netherlandish towns. Taking as their point of departure the ways in which architecture has been, is, and can be written about and otherwise represented, the editors' substantial Introduction provides an historiographical framework for, and draws out the themes and ideas presented in, the individual contributors' essays. Contributors: Christine Stevenson, T. A. Heslop, John Mitchell, Malcolm Thurlby, Richard Fawcett, Jill A. Franklin, Stephen Heywood, Roger Stalley, Veronica Sekules, John Onians, Frank Woodman, Paul Crossley, David Hemsoll, Kerry Downes, Richard Plant, Jenifer Ní Ghrádraigh, Lindy Grant, Elisabeth de Bièvre, Stefan Muthesius, Robert Hillenbrand, Andrew M. Shanken, Peter Guillery.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781843837817
  • Publisher: Boydell & Brewer, Limited
  • Publication date: 11/15/2012
  • Pages: 430
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

years ago in the present-day Ukraine to a surfer's memorial in Carpinteria, California; other subjects include the young Michelangelo seeking to transcend genre boundaries; medieval masons' tombs; and the mythographies of early modern Netherlandish towns. 000

List of Illustrations vii

Preface: In Appreciation xvi

List of contributors xvii

Introduction Christine Stevenson T. A. Heslop 1

Incitements to Interpret in Late Antique and Medieval Architecture

Believing is Seeing: The Natural Image in Late Antiquity John Mitchell 16

Articulation as an Expression of Function in Romanesque Architecture Malcolm Thurlby 42

Barrel-Vaulted Churches in Late Medieval Scotland Richard Fawcett 60

Augustinian and Other Canons' Churches in Romanesque Europe: The Significance of the Aisleless Cruciform Plan Jill A. Franklin 78

Towers and Radiating Chapels in Romanesque Architectural Iconography Stephen Heywood 99

Diffusion, Imitation and Evolution: The Uncertain Origins of 'Beakhead' Ornament Roger Stalley 111

Architecture and Pattern: The Western Facade of Lincoln Cathedral and Modernist Reference Points for its Interpretation Veronica Sekules 128

Authors and Intentions

Home Sweet Mammoth: Neuroarchaeology and the Origins of Architecture John Onians 146

Constantine and Helena: The Roman in English Romanesque T. A. Heslop 163

For Their Monuments, Look about You: Medieval Masons and their Tombs Francis Woodman 176

Baxandall's Bridge and Charles IV's Prague: An Exercise in Architectural Intention Paul Crossley 192

Imitation as a Creative Vehicle in Michelangelo's Art and Architecture David Hemsoll 221

The 'Facade Problem' in Roman Churches, c. 1540-1640 Kerry Downes 242

Architecture beyond Building

Innovation and Traditionalism in Writings on English Romanesque Richard Plant 266

Why Medieval Ireland Failed to Edify Jenifer Ní Ghrádaigh 284

The Chapel of the Hospital of Saint-Jean at Angers: Acta, Statutes, Architecture and Interpretation Lindy Grant 306

Sealed Architecture: City Seals, Architecture and Urban Identity in the Northern Netherlands, 1200-1700 Elisabeth de Bièvre 315

Style and Geography: Struggles for Identification in the Later Nineteenth Century Stefan Muthesius 333

The Dome of the Rock: From Medieval Symbol to Modern Propaganda Robert Hillenbrand 343

Towards a Cultural Geography of Modern Memorials Andrew M. Shanken 357

Bicycle Sheds Revisited, Or: Why are Houses Interesting? Peter Guillery 381

Index 399

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