Archon

Archon

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by Lana Krumwiede, Nick Podehl
     
 

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As the powerless and the powerful clash, allies and enemies are not always who they seem to be in this dynamic sequel to the dystopian novel Freakling.

Having used his unique connection with the Heart of the Earth to terminate the use of psi, or telekinesis, in the secluded city of Deliverance, twelve-year-old Taemon bears the burden of

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Overview

As the powerless and the powerful clash, allies and enemies are not always who they seem to be in this dynamic sequel to the dystopian novel Freakling.

Having used his unique connection with the Heart of the Earth to terminate the use of psi, or telekinesis, in the secluded city of Deliverance, twelve-year-old Taemon bears the burden of responsibility for the fate of its people. With society in disarray, his family missing, and tensions looming with the mysterious Republik, Taemon confronts the startling discovery that he alone can still use psi — and that it comes with a price. In an attempt to find his father and prevent war, Taemon and his friend Amma set out on a dangerous journey to the Republik. But what they find there is far from what they expected, and Taemon’s understanding of the world is challenged. Will his psi and his courage be enough to conquer the obstacles standing in the way of peace?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Readers who liked the breakneck pacing of the first book will not be disappointed in this one. The action never flags, leaving little time for character development or introspection, which just might appeal to reluctant readers. ... Krumwiede has done a masterful job of creating and sustaining suspense.
—School Library Journal
Voya Reviews, April 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 1) - Kate Neff
In this sequel to Freakling (Candlewick, 2012/Voya October 2012), the story picks back up with twelve-year-old Taemon, now the sole carrier of telekinetic powers known as psi, trying to redeem himself and save his city from attack from the Republik. Taemon now knows he is the True Son and is connected to the Heart of the Earth, the godlike figure of the series, and he must live with the repercussions of his choice to take psi away from everyone in his home of Deliverance—everyone but himself. Taemon decides to head to the Republik, where he discovers that there are people known as archons—new carriers of psi, or as they refer to it, dominion, who are being trained to destroy Deliverance and its inhabitants. The story starts off a little slowly, but once Taemon reaches the Republik, the pacing speeds up. The fantastical setting and themes of the story might not have broad appeal, but readers who like fantasy, and especially those who were fans of the first novel, will enjoy this one. The end wraps up nicely with a moment of peace, but it is clear that war is on the horizon for Taemon and his people. Reviewer: Kate Neff; Ages 12 to 15.
Children's Literature - Zella Cunningham
Archon, the sequel to The Freakling, starts with Taemon searching for his Da and Mam amid the fallen city of Deliverance. For four months, the residents of the city have had to function without their psi, the telekinetic property that allows them to perform everyday manual labor with their thoughts. Taemon knows that the loss of psi is his fault and he tries to protect the now powerless city from invasion. First, he must rescue his father from the Republik. The Republik is a city that wants to use its psi, which they call dominion, to train soldiers called archons. Deliverance is separated from the Republik by a mountain. The Prophet Nathan erected the dividing mountain with his psi when he and a group of citizens left the Republik, seeking to start a peaceful colony that could function without psi and would therefore be closer to the Heart of the Earth. The Heart of the Earth gave Taemon the choice of taking his place as the True Son or becoming an instrument of war. Taemon’s search for his father leads him and his friend Amma to encounter the Republikite Gevri and his jaguar Jix. Gevri, against his wishes, has been trained as a warrior. Gevri wants to escape to peaceful Deliverance. He helps Taemon and Amma at first, but turns on them when he discovers that Deliverance is not what he believed it to be. At the beginning of each chapter is a quote from The Warrior’s Serenity, which was probably introduced in The Freakling. To fully understand the plot, it is helpful to read the first book and, because the ending leaves the reader wanting to know what happens next, another book or two would be welcome. Young adult readers will be unable to put this book down; the author’s words are descriptive and captivating. Second book in the “Psi Chronicles” series. Reviewer: Zella Cunningham; Ages 12 up.
School Library Journal
11/01/2013
Gr 6 Up—In this dystopian sequel to Freakling (Candlewick, 2012), 12-year-old Taemon must face the consequences of removing the power of PSI (telekenesis) from those who have it. He thought that taking it away would unite the city of Deliverance and eliminate the segregation between those with PSI and those without it. He was wrong. The city remains in shambles as the people struggle to accept a life of manual labor. The novel begins with Taemon and his close ally, Amma, searching abandoned asylums for his parents, who were separated from him before a great earthquake. He finds his mother and learns that his father has been taken to the Republik; to rescue him, he and Amma must cross Mount Deliverance. Readers who liked the breakneck pacing of the first book will not be disappointed in this one. The action never flags, leaving little time for character development or introspection, which just might appeal to reluctant readers. Archon bears striking similarities to Ally Condie's Crossed (Dutton, 2011), but is a better fit for the middle-grade crowd as it steers clear of romance and relies heavily on battle scenes. Krumwiede has done a masterful job of creating and sustaining suspense.—Jennifer Furuyama, Pendleton Public Library, OR
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
This sequel to Freakling (2012) offers a solid story and character development that can be enjoyed by fans of dystopia whether or not they've read the first installment. Thirteen-year-old Taemon is tormented by guilt, knowing he is responsible for the loss of psi--or telekinetic ability--among his people. His guilt is compounded when he discovers he alone still possesses psi. When Taemon discovers his missing mother, now in a fragile and untrustworthy mental state, she hints that his father has been taken to the Republik, a land that exists over an impassable mountain range. Armed with this tenuous knowledge, Taemon undertakes a dangerous journey to save his father. Joining him is Amma, a wonderfully strong friend on whom Taemon must rely heavily, both figuratively and literally. While some of the events of the book feel a bit convenient and the conflict is resolved too quickly and easily, these are minor quibbles with a story that has solid worldbuilding and a satisfying conclusion. The main weakness of this book is Krumwiede's reliance on old tropes: While Taemon and Amma are both described as having dark eyes and hair and light brown skin, the book's villains are described as dark-complexioned. Isn't it time to retire this stereotype? All in all, though, a better-than-average addition to the plethora of dystopias being published today. (Dystopian adventure. 10-14)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781480518278
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
10/08/2013
Series:
Psi Chronicles Series, #2
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 5.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
9 - 11 Years

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