Are You a Corporate Refugee?: A Survival Guide for Downsized, Disillusioned and Displaced Workers

Overview

During the mid-1990s, 1 in 16 workers were displaced by downsizing, reorganization, or corporate mergers and acquisitions. Ruth Luban, a counselor who specializes in recovery from job loss, recognizes that leaving the workforce causes not only a loss of income, but also of identity, structure, and community. Her step-by-step program addresses these problems and explains how ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $1.99   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(653)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New

Ships from: NIAGARA FALLS, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$19.95
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(662)

Condition: New
{NEW} Paperback. Page edges beginning to tan due to age.

Ships from: Luzerne, MI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

During the mid-1990s, 1 in 16 workers were displaced by downsizing, reorganization, or corporate mergers and acquisitions. Ruth Luban, a counselor who specializes in recovery from job loss, recognizes that leaving the workforce causes not only a loss of income, but also of identity, structure, and community. Her step-by-step program addresses these problems and explains how to work through them. Using case studies, exercises, and informative sidebars, she identifies the five emotional stages of job loss:

* On the Brink
* Letting Go
* In the Wilderness
* Seeing the Beacon
* In the New Land

Luban shows how to move through the emotional upheaval of job loss and return to the workforce with a sense of control and direction.

Author Bio: Ruth Luban is a psychotherapist and consultant in private practice who has spent the last 25 years developing workshops and treatment programs for people facing life transitions.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Last year alone, more than 750,000 Americans lost their jobs due to corporate downsizing, reorganization, mergers and acquisitions, maintaining a trend that's lasted about as long as our recent economic boom. For those who can answer "yes" to the question Are You a Corporate Refugee?, Ruth Laban, a counselor specializing in midlife transition and professional burnout issues, has written a practical and compassionate guide to recovery and renewal that knowingly addresses the larger issues of change and loss that accompany the experience of losing a job. Agent, Gail Ross. 8-city author tour; national radio interviews. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140296327
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/1/2001
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 7.52 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Downsizing: The New "Normal"

"We should call this group the Career Kevorkian Club!" Jessica blurted out as she scanned the room filled with fellow support group members. She followed her reference to the Michigan doctor who assisted many in ending their lives with, "Every one of us nearly gave our soul to a corporation that sucked us dry. Instead of rewarding us, they let us go. The only saving grace would be the mercy killing of our jobs."

The group burst into nervous laughter, not sure if Jessica really meant mercy killing, assisted suicide, or just plain murder. But slowly, one by one, the participants nodded in knowing agreement, and the label stuck. Each week someone in the group would ask, "so, who is the next among us to be Kevorked?" Or, in response to the all-too-familiar sob story of a new member, one of the veterans would muse, "Uh-oh, sounds like he needs to be Kevorked."

Frank certainly would agree. Frank, fifty-two years old, was a senior engineer and vice president of technical services for a large conglomerate, his only employer during his twenty-six years in the workforce. Frank was comfortable at his job-so comfortable that he describes himself as having been "asleep at the wheel" when the changes began.

His first brush with downsizing was the elimination of several positions at his company and the relocation of those remaining from Indianapolis to North Carolina. Frank, a lucky survivor of this first purge, agreed to a transfer even though his wife did not want to move. A year later, the company implemented another restructuring and yet another relocation. This time, Frank's wife refused to move. Frank, fearful of losing his job and benefits, commuted to Chicago while his family remained in North Carolina.

The final downsizing was the most heartbreaking. Frank and several other engineers were called to a meeting. Those being retained were led to one room. Those being downsized, which included Frank, were taken to another room and told they had ten minutes to clean out their desks and leave the premises. When one worker protested that he carpooled to work and had no way home, the meeting facilitator said someone would take the carpoolers home. Frank says he will never forget feeling like a criminal as he hurriedly threw his belongings in a box and left the company forever.

Looking back, Frank realizes there were many signs that further changes would follow that first reorganization. With each move, corporate managers were offered severance packages to leave "voluntarily " Rumors spread that threats of involuntary removal accompanied those "offers." Frank had stayed because he had invested so much time in the company and would soon be eligible for a healthy retirement pension. In the end, he was dumped, with no pension, a year short of earning his retirement benefits.

Frank is a victim of the new workplace reality: corporations would„,he says, "sooner choose the young guys fresh out with their MBAs, willing to be 'transferred every year if necessary, than honor the years of blood, sweat, and tears put in by people like [me]." He identifies with the realities of refugees-people who are forced to leave their homeland because of persecution, repression, or rejection. Left with little choice or control, they must quickly adjust to new terrain, new language, and new customs.

Stages of Loss and Recovery

Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, in her now-classic book On Death and Dying, identified five stages of recovery that follow the death of a loved one. Her work was groundbreaking, not only for its attention to the then taboo subject of death and dying, but also for its suggestion that healing from loss takes time and includes definable stages. While certain primitive cultures compassionately allow a year of recovery time after a profound loss, we Westerners are given only a day or two off from work or school when someone close to us dies. Then we're expected back at our desks, and back to "normal." In fact, humans require far longer periods of recovery to return to optimal levels of physical, mental, and emotional functioning. Kiibler-Ross suggested that we recover from profound loss only after passing through five stages: denial, bargaining, depression, anger, and, finally, acceptance.

William Bridges also writes about loss and has examined the process in many contexts, including that of career loss. In his seminal book, Transitions: Making the Most of Personal Change, written in the wake of his own career shift from college professor to gentleman farmer, Bridges explains that change occurs externally as an event, a moment in time. But its impact occurs internally and takes longer to process because of the shock and grief involved. He calls this process transition. In Bridges's transition paradigm, we experience, knowingly or not, three stages after a loss before we are truly ready to begin anew: the Ending, of the old way of doing and being; the Neutral Zone, a time of being "stuck in neutral, unable to go forward or backward"; and the New Beginning, when a new pattern of doing or being takes hold. Each stage is a process that takes time to complete and varies with each individual...

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: How I Became a Corporate Refugee xiii
1 Downsizing: The New "Normal" 1
2 Stage I: On Your Turf ... Or On the Brink? 13
Pit Stop: En Route to Letting Go: The Job Search 48
3 Stage II: Letting Go (of the Old Reality) 61
4 Stage III: In the Wilderness 113
5 Stage IV: Seeing the Beacon 169
Pit Stop: En Route to the New Land: Overcoming Roadblocks 205
6 Stage V: In the New Land: The New Reality 215
Conclusion: An Amazing Comeback Story--to Mirror Your Own 239
Resources 243
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2003

    Corporate Downsizing - Morally and Ethically Wrong

    It's a sad reality that this book is needed in America.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)