Argument as Dialogue: A Concise Guide

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More About This Textbook

Overview

Argument as Dialogue is a concise and affordable guide to persuasive writing and research that treats argument as a process of dialogue and deliberation—the exchange of opinions and ideas—among people of different values and perspectives.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205019120
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Edition description: Concise
  • Pages: 312
  • Sales rank: 611,673
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface

PART ONE Strategies for Reading and Writing Arguments

CHAPTER 1 Understanding Persuasion: Thinking Like a Negotiator

Argument

What Makes an Argument

The Uses of Argument

Debate

Moving from Debate to Dialogue

Dialogue

Deliberation

Deborah Tannen, “Taking a ‘War of Words’ Too Literally”

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Michael Lewis, “The Case Against Tipping”

Paula Broadwell, "Women Soldiers Crucial to US Mission"

CHAPTER 2 Reading Arguments: Thinking Like a Critic

Why Read Critically?

Preview the Reading

Skim the Reading

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Henry Wechsler, “Binge Drinking Must Be Stopped”

Consider Your Own Experience

Annotate the Reading

Summarize the Reading

Analyze and Evaluate the Reading

Argue with the Reading

Create a Debate and Dialogue Between Two or More Readings

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Fromma Harrop, “Stop Babysitting College Students” (student essay)

Construct a Debate

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Kathryn Stewart and Corina Sole, “Letter to the Editor” from the Washington Post

James C. Carter, S. J., “Letter to the Editor” from the Times-Picayune

Deliberate About the Readings

Look for Logical Fallacies

CHAPTER 3 Finding Arguments: Thinking Like a Writer

The Writing Process

Finding Topics to Argue

Developing Argumentative Topics

Finding Ideas Worth Writing About

Refining Topics

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Stephanie Bower, “What’s the Rush? Speed Yields Mediocrity in Local Television News” (student essay)

CHAPTER 4 Addressing Audiences: Thinking Like a Reader

The Target Audience

The General Audience

Guidelines for Knowing Your Audience

Adapting to Your Readers’ Attitudes

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Derrick Jackson, "Let's Ban All Flavors of Cigarettes"

Gio Batta Gori, "The Bogus 'Science' of Secondhand Smoke"

Danise Cavallaro, “Smoking: Offended by the Numbers” (student essay)

Choosing Your Words

CHAPTER 5 Shaping Arguments: Thinking Like an Architect

Components of an Argument

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Clara Spotted Elk, “Indian Bones”

Analyzing the Structure

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Ron Karpati, “I Am the Enemy”

Analyzing the Structure

Two Basic Types for Arguments

Position Arguments

Sample Position Arguments for Analysis

Sean Flynn, “Is Anything Private Anymore?”

Analysis of a Sample Position Argument

Proposal Arguments

Sample Proposal Arguments for Analysis

Amanda Collins, “Bring East Bridgewater Elementary into the World” (student essay)

Analyzing the Structure

Narrative Arguments

Sample Narrative Arguments

Jerry Fensterman, “I See Why Others Choose to Die”

Analyzing the Structure

Analyzing the Narrative Features

CHAPTER 6 Using Evidence: Thinking Like an Advocate

How Much Evidence is Enough?

Why Arguments Need Supporting Evidence

Forms of Evidence

Kari Peterson, “The Statistic Speaks: A Real Person's Argument for Universal Healthcare” (student essay)

Different Interpretations of Evidence

S. Fred Singer, “The Great Global Warming Swindle”

Some Tips About Supporting Evidence

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Arthur Allen, “Prayer in Prison: Religion as Rehabilitation”

CHAPTER 7 Establishing Claims: Thinking Like a Skeptic

The Toulmin Model

Toulmin’s Terms

Finding Warrants

Sample Arguments for Analysis

Steven Pinker, “Why They Kill Their Newborns”

An Analysis Based on the Toulmin Model

Michael Kelly, “Arguing for Infanticide”

Sample Student Argument for Analysis

Lowell Putnam, “Did I Miss Something?” (student essay)

CHAPTER 8 Using Visual Arguments: Thinking Like an Illustrator

Common Forms of Visual Arguments

Analyzing Visual Arguments

Art

Pablo Picasso’s Guernica

Norman Rockwell’s Freedom of Speech

Advertisements

Sample Ads for Analysis

Toyota Prius Ad

Fresh Step Cat Litter

Victoria’s Dirty Secret

Editorial or Political Cartoons

Mike Luckovich's "Let's Be Responsible" Cartoon

Pat Bagley’s “Back in Aught-Five ...” Cartoon

Daryl Cagle’s “I Hate Them” Cartoon

News Photographs

Ancillary Graphics: Tables, Charts, and Graphs

Sample Student Argument for Analysis

Lee Innes, “A Double Standard of Olympic Proportions” (student essay)

CHAPTER 9 Researching Arguments: Thinking Like an Investigator

Sources of Information

A Search Strategy

Sample Entries for an Annotated Bibliography

Locating Sources

Evaluating Sources

Taking Notes

Drafting Your Paper

Revising and Editing Your Paper

Preparing and Proofreading Your Final Manuscript

Plagiarism

DOCUMENTATION GUIDE: MLA and APA Styles

Where Does the Documentation Go?

Documentation Style

A Brief Guide to MLA and APA Styles

SAMPLE RESEARCH PAPERS

Shannon O’Neill, “Literature Hacked and Torn Apart: Censorship in Public Schools” (MLA) (student essay)

Dan Hoskins, "Tapped Out: Bottled Water's Detrimental Side" (APA) (student essay)

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