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Armageddon Bound
     

Armageddon Bound

4.6 3
by Tim Marquitz, Lisa Jackson (Editor), Jessica Lucero (Illustrator)
 

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Half-devil and miles from anything resembling heroic, perpetual underdog Frank "Triggaltheron" Trigg is the last man standing against Armageddon. As the favorite nephew of the Devil, Frank has led a troubled life, but he'd always had his uncle's influence to fall back on. Now, with God and Lucifer coming to terms and leaving existence to fend for itself, his once

Overview

Half-devil and miles from anything resembling heroic, perpetual underdog Frank "Triggaltheron" Trigg is the last man standing against Armageddon. As the favorite nephew of the Devil, Frank has led a troubled life, but he'd always had his uncle's influence to fall back on. Now, with God and Lucifer coming to terms and leaving existence to fend for itself, his once exalted status of Anti-Christ-to-be does little to endear him to the hordes of angels and demons running amok in the Godless world.

With help from the members of DRAC, an organization of wizards, psychics, telepaths, and low-end supernatural beings, Frank must thwart the pro-Armageddon forces and rescue an angel in whose life rests the fate of humanity.

Better luck next time, humanity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781615720002
Publisher:
Damnation Books, LLC
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Pages:
308
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.69(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

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Armageddon Bound 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Gary_W_Olson More than 1 year ago
Dark urban fantasy is a subgenre I've grown a taste for in recent years. Life in a packed city environment seems tailor made for stories mixing dark urges, tension, suspense, action, and the right amount of humor. Simon R. Green and Jim Butcher have both successfully mined this territory in their respective series (The Nightside series and the Dresden Files). Now Tim Marquitz has done the same, unleashing a fast, furious, and compelling story in the opening volume of his Demon Squad series. I enjoyed the worldbuilding on display throughout, positing a world in which God and the Devil have both abandoned the Earth, leaving angels and demons and humanity to get on as best they can. Naturally, this results in scheming and plotting that brings the world to the brink of armageddon (hey, there's a reason the book isn't called "Puppies and Ice Cream Bound"...). It falls to Frank Trigg and his occult-wise, heavily-armed allies to somehow figure out how to derail it. There is a lot of action in this book, and Marquitz does a very good job at keeping it clear and focused without lots of 'telling.' I also enjoyed the personality of Frank Trigg, who, while hardly an angel (part-demon, actually, and at times all-libido), has his limits, and knows when it's time to take a stand against impossible odds. I expect I'll very much enjoy the following books in the series.
the_one_who_reads More than 1 year ago
Review by Dan Breen for The Written Universe Take equal measures of 50's detective pulp fiction, a Carl Hiaasen central character, and The Omen, blend carefully then serve chilled with a good Metal soundtrack. Now throw it away and read this instead. In Armageddon Bound Tim Marquitz introduces probably one of the most likable anti heroes I've come across - Frank Trigg, (or Triggaltheron, depending on how far "south" you come from); Nephew of Lucifer, part human, and the only known character in any book to have turned down the opportunity to become the Anti-Christ. The back story is that both God and the Devil have disappeared without trace, much to the confusion of their respective sides leaving the various choirs and minions to do what they do best - fight each other in a celestial Cold War taking place on earth. However, in the years since the disappearances of the respective heads, other factions have appeared, crossing the usual Demon/Angel lines, pro and anti Armageddonists, and it's against these factions, and his estranged Succubi wife, that Frank, Scarlett, (an angel, his cousin), Katon, (Vampire), and Rahim, (mage), find themselves pitched in this rather different and entertaining novel. The story itself starts straight into the action, but at a pace not to leave the reader behind, and while fast moving, is not too fast as to leave the reader struggling to keep up. The characters themselves feel rounded, fully formed and engaging while the settings are illustrated well enough to give the picture without distracting from the story itself. Thoroughly entertaining with some good humorous, if slightly wrong, moments thrown in, (remember though, he is part demon). If you're a fan of Good Omens, any of the Lazlo Woodbine series, (Robert Rankin), or are old enough to remember the "Oh God, you Devil" movies with George Burns, you'll like this one.
Melhay More than 1 year ago
There are rumors there is another demon planning to rise to be the next Lucifer and to bring about Armageddon. Baalth is the demon this new power needs to overcome first and Frank, the DRAC, and Frank's Angel cousin Scarlett need to protect Baalth and stop this new threat to the world. The catch, Scarlett has been after Baalth for some time to stop his bad doings. Baalth isn't cooperating as willingly with Frank, without some deals. Oh, and Franks succubus ex-wife has returned to town sending assassins after him. Frank Triggaltheron, or Trigg, starts the story on his kester bleeding, and visits this position often through out the book. But he keeps fighting. Trigg is a man of all men. And a pig from time to time as well. But that is what makes this character memorable. I don't mind the thoughts he has about women, or even the smart remarks to the one delivering the punches (actually many of the quick remarks are funny). But some people might. I do have to mention the only thing about Trigg that gave me the willies were his thoughts about his voluptuous cousin. They just weren't right, but Trigg is the person he is... and I don't think he was made to be loved so dearly. I think this book is what many male readers would enjoy. It's fast moving and full of action and fights. There are loads of blows exchanged and a story that works wonderfully with it. I liked the story telling style. This book is told by Frank. We get the story as it's happening, then there are interjections by Trigg of his inner opinions and thoughts, the ones he keeps to himself although just as smart as the ones he says. This technique of inner thoughts gives me the feel of the old style mystery gumshoe movies where the detective gives an inner thought or meaning to things as the story goes. I really liked that feel. It seemed to me the book is very story driven, and we get a very good story here. The characters. Goodness! There is a large cast of characters. Well, maybe not that big. But it felt like many when I was reading the book. They are not hard to keep straight, which is the surprise to me with as many there are. The world is our world with a few extras which people don't really know about. But the difference here is God and Lucifer have come to a truce and left, letting humanity play out as they are and grown to do. I like this twist a lot. I like how there are two views to this through out the book. That God didn't want Armageddon or he would have exterminated the race and started over. OR. That Armageddon needs to come about to bring God and Lucifer back. This seems to be the arguing views in a nut shell. People don't know their gods are no longer around, only the Angels and Demons are aware, and seem slightly lost with their leaders gone. Neat take here. I went into the book aware there where some editing errors, which there are. But knowing that I was prepared for them. But I do want to let you know this to as well, in case you go purchase the book, they are there. I hate to see editing slow down a good book. I think more men might enjoy this book than women, but I'm not saying don't read it if it sounds like something you might enjoy. Please go at it.