×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Arminius: A Study in the Dutch Reformation
     

Arminius: A Study in the Dutch Reformation

5.0 1
by Carl Bangs, Joseph D. Allison (Editor)
 

See All Formats & Editions

A definitive biography of the intriguing and controversial Dutch thinker of the late sixteenth - early seventeenth centuries. Not merely a biography in the traditional sense, the book involves much intellectual history as well as a short history of Amsterdam.

Overview

A definitive biography of the intriguing and controversial Dutch thinker of the late sixteenth - early seventeenth centuries. Not merely a biography in the traditional sense, the book involves much intellectual history as well as a short history of Amsterdam.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780310294818
Publisher:
Zondervan
Publication date:
06/01/1985
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
384

Meet the Author

Carl O. Bangs, Ph.D., University of Chicago, was a French Hornist with the University of Washington Symphony and other symphony orchestras from 1938-43. He served as Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Olivet Nazarene College, Bourbonais, Ill from 1953-61 and was the Associate Professor and Professor of Historical Theology, St. Paul's School of Theology, Kansas City, Missouri from 1961-1988. Other books include, "Our Roots of Belief: Biblical Faith and Faithful Theology" and "The Communist Encounter".

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Arminius; a Study in the Dutch Reformation 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
navychef More than 1 year ago
As one who was never quite an Arminian but professed Calvinism for about a year, this book was invaluable in helping me to understand the historical political and sociological underpinnings to the debate. Whether or not Calvin would be a Calvinist himself by today's definition will always be a strong topic, but I doubt that Arminius would have ever put anything in writing had he not been under such regular attack from the more extreme followers of Beza. Bangs' exceptionally-detailed research sheds much light on the Synod of Dordt and why the Remonstrants were soundly condemned. I wonder how many of today's 5-point teachers would reconsider their own positions with such a fair assessment of Armimius' doctrines and his own commitment to sola scriptura.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent study on a topic sorely neglected in Christian academic circles. From the lack of material available one might think Arminius and Arminianism, to say nothing of the Dutch Reformation in general, did not warrant any academic respectability whatsoever. Carl Bangs has given the subject more than academic respectability in this work. He has provided a thorough answer to the Calvinist who (often ignorantly but certainly forcefully) disregards Arminius' interpretation of Scripture as 'heretical.' It is interesting to note that John Wesley, having no knowledge of Arminius' writings, reached most of the same conclusions on his own. It is often assumed that Wesley took his doctrine from Arminius, when in fact it was only after he had formulated his doctrines that he became acquainted with the writings of Arminius and realized the agreement between his own views and those of the Dutch Reformer. Only at that point did Wesley call himself an Arminian. Carl Bangs presents clearly and concisely the journey Arminius took from wholehearted Calvinist under Beza, Calvin's successor in Geneva, to the studies of Scripture and early Church Fathers, as well as the stirrings of his own conscience that lead him to conclusions that differed from those of Calvin, particularly concerning parts of the book of Romans. Bangs also demonstrates that the views of Arminius himself were not as radical as his followers, and much of (but not all of) what Calvinists so bitterly oppose in Arminianism was actually not what Arminius himself taught. Having studied Arminius, John Wesley and Charles Finney, it is clear that Wesley was more significant than either of the other two. This is due to Wesley's unflinching reliance on Scripture, which he believed to be the Word of God. Arminius also had such a view of Scripture, a fact often overlooked by Calvinists who denounce him as a false teacher. Charles Finney might have been more consistent in his preaching and teaching had he relied as much on the Bible as his two predecessors and less on intuitive reason and judgement. Yet Arminius and Wesley had the advantage of being well-trained for ministry of the Word, whereas Finney was educated as a Lawyer and was called to ministry later in life. Bangs does an excellent job of showing the influences on Arminius during his academic and pastoral career. This is not a book to read for edification, as it is pretty dry reading. For those interested in the subject, however, Carl Bangs writing will hold your interest.