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Arms and Hunger
     

Arms and Hunger

by Willy Brandt, Anthea Bell (Translator)
 

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In this strongly worded book, Brandt goes beyond the diplomatic role he has formerly played and describes major problems plaguing the globe today, as well as solutions for them.

Overview

In this strongly worded book, Brandt goes beyond the diplomatic role he has formerly played and describes major problems plaguing the globe today, as well as solutions for them.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this era of global interdependence, warns the former chancellor of the Federal Republic, we face the prospect of perishing together unless we take responsibility for each other's well-being. With copious statistics and projections, Brandt argues that we are more concerned with military security than with hunger and malnutritionwhich in the end may pose an even greater threat. Pointing out that a faster tempo of development in the have-not nations would also benefit the haves, he calls for a cooperative international effort to fight hunger in the Third World. Brandt faults the Reagan administration for failing to recognize the debt crisis as a long-term barrier to development that is slowly strangling economic growth worldwide. An international monetary system is a necessary precondition for peace, in his opinion, and would eventually supersede the present system which serves primarily to finance ``this obscene madness called the arms race.'' (June 16)
Library Journal
Much of what Brandt has to say in this book has been said beforebut not by anyone with his unrivalled connections. As a former German chancellor and head of the International Commission on Development Issues, Brandt knows both the issues and the leading players. Not surprisingly, then, anecdote and reminiscence figure largely in his plea for a ``new deal'' for poor countries. Some readers may yearn for a less diplomatic approach, but, even though it sometimes reads like a collection of speeches, this is a good overview of North-South issues. Brandt has some good ideas and his optimistic tone in the face of worldwide catastrophe is rather heartening. Recommended. Ian Wallace, Agriculture Canada Lib., St.-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780394554464
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/12/1986
Edition description:
1st American ed
Pages:
224

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Brandt's findings, like his suggestions, are realistic and discriminating; he distinguishes among the countries that need development aid, outlines the problems peculiar to each, and emphasizes the importance of substituting self-help for relief. Brandt deplores the cost of the arms race, but he argues that Europe need not be deterred by the military extravagances of the superpowers, and can and should act on its own to lend money and supply skills for Third World development." The New Yorker

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