Around the World in a Hundred Years by Jean Fritz, Anthony Bacon Venti |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Around the World in a Hundred Years: From Henry the Navigator to Magellan

Around the World in a Hundred Years: From Henry the Navigator to Magellan

by Jean Fritz
     
 

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Jean Fritz brings history to life once again in 10 true tales of 15th-century European explorers�from Bartholomew Diaz and Christopher Columbus to Juan Ponce de Le�n and Vasco N��ez de Balboa�who changed the map and left behind stories of adventure too good to miss. Fritz approaches [the salient facts] with playful irreverence; accordingly, the frequently traveled

Overview

Jean Fritz brings history to life once again in 10 true tales of 15th-century European explorers�from Bartholomew Diaz and Christopher Columbus to Juan Ponce de Le�n and Vasco N��ez de Balboa�who changed the map and left behind stories of adventure too good to miss. Fritz approaches [the salient facts] with playful irreverence; accordingly, the frequently traveled material can seem refreshingly new. � Publishers Weekly, starred review [Fritz] turns in a fast-paced narrative enriched and enlivened by fascinating stories and details of the sort that rarely appear in standard textbooks. � Kirkus Reviews, pointer review No one is better than Jean Fritz at making history interesting as well as comprehensible. � The Horn Book Jean Fritz lives in Dobbs Ferry, New York. Anthony Bacon Venti lives in Rockland, Maine.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Noted biographer and historian Fritz ( Bully for You, Teddy Roosevelt ) offers a wickedly funny look at 10 explorers who, between 1421 and 1522, ventured into what contemporaneous mapmakers called the Unknown. While presenting the salient facts, Fritz approaches them with playful irreverence; accordingly, the frequently traveled material can seem refreshingly new. Discussing Amerigo Vespucci, she writes, ``Some give him credit for recognizing a continent when he saw one. Others call him an out-and-out faker.'' This tone proves especially effective when Fritz addresses such problematic issues as the treatment of native people and the often accidental nature of many of the discoveries. Reflecting the humor of Fritz's text, Venti's lighthearted black-and-white drawings use subtle strokes, as in a picture of Balboa, heavily in debt, stowed away on a ship and peering out from the barrel he'd hidden inside. Readable, attractive maps begin each chapter, providing useful visual references for each voyager's route. Ages 7-11. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-A look at ``the first great wave of European exploration'' (1421-1522) through brief portraits of various participants. Fritz does many things well here. She writes with ease and humor, including details that add color and humanity to historical figures, and skillfully incorporates research into her narrative. She presents the heroic aspects of the voyages, as well as evidence of the arrogance, cruelty, and greed many of these men displayed. Despite all the good attributes, the book suffers because of the complexity of the subject matter. By including so many different individuals, the issue becomes complicated; after a while, the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese names start to run together. Some of the men's lifetimes and discoveries overlap, which makes it even more difficult to sort out who did what... and when. The illustrations are beautiful, entertaining, Renaissance-inspired pencil drawings. They include many amusing touches, such as the island of Porto Santo being overtaken by rabbits, but because they are in black and white and almost too finely drawn, they do not have a great deal of child appeal. A map at the beginning of each chapter shows the explorer's route. An outline of the continents appears on the end papers, but there aren't enough world maps throughout the book to enable readers to get a more complete picture of how the ``discovered'' countries fit into the world as a whole. The text is not straightforward enough for reports, but interested readers may enjoy perusing these tales of adventure and scientific discovery.-Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA
Carolyn Phelan
Beginning with a historical summary of geographical knowledge from Ptolemy through the Dark Ages to Prince Henry the Navigator, Fritz tells of that 100-year period when Europeans explored the world and mapped the globe. As ever, she includes details that other writers overlook, such as the fact that Balboa's dog Leoncico, "who received a captain's pay on every expedition," led the attack dogs on his master's trip to the Pacific. Although each chapter focuses on one explorer, the text ties their stories into one extended narrative. For example, Leoncico was named after Ponce de Leon, who gave Balboa one of the puppies of his beloved dog Bercerillo. Softly shaded pencil drawings capture the author's humor as well as the more serious and occasionally violent parts of the story. Students looking for a fill-in-the-blank approach to history assignments may prefer standard biographies of explorers, but those seeking a broader picture will find this an intriguing view of the age of exploration.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606131490
Publisher:
San Val, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/01/1998
Edition description:
REPRINT

Meet the Author

Jean Fritz, the Newbery Honor-winning author of Homesick, is best known for her engaging and enlightening nonfiction for young readers,including What's the Big Idea, Ben Franklin?, And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?, and Shh! We're Writing the Constitution. She was honored with the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature by the New York State Library Association, and won the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her career contribution to American children's literature.

Jean Fritz, the Newbery Honor-winning author of Homesick, is best known for her engaging and enlightening nonfiction for young readers, including What's the Big Idea, Ben Franklin?, And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?, and Shh! We're Writing the Constitution. She was honored with the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature by the New York State Library Association, and won the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her career contribution to American children's literature.

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