Around the World in Eighty Days

Around the World in Eighty Days

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by Jules Verne

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A fastidious English gentleman makes a remarkable wager - he will travel around the world in eighty days or forfeit his life's savings. Thus begins Jules Verne's classic 1872 novel, which remains unsurpassed in sheer story-telling entertainment and pure adventure. Phileas Fogg and his faithful manservant, Jean Passepartout, embark on a fantastic journey into a world…  See more details below


A fastidious English gentleman makes a remarkable wager - he will travel around the world in eighty days or forfeit his life's savings. Thus begins Jules Verne's classic 1872 novel, which remains unsurpassed in sheer story-telling entertainment and pure adventure. Phileas Fogg and his faithful manservant, Jean Passepartout, embark on a fantastic journey into a world filled with danger and beauty - from the exotic shores of India, where the heroic travelers rescue a beautiful Raja's wife from ritual sacrifice, to the rugged American frontier, where their train is ambushed by an angry Sioux tribe. Fogg's mission is complicated by an incredible case of mistaken identity that sends a Scotland Yard detective in hot pursuit. At once a riveting race against time and an action-packed odyssey into the unknown, Around the World in Eighty Days is a masterpiece of adventure fiction that has captured the imaginations of generations of readers - and continues to enthrall us today.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 3-5 - All three adaptations of these classic novels fall prey to the usual pitfalls involved in such a process. The bare outlines of the plots are provided, but character development, a true sense of place and time with regard to setting, and masterful description of the action all go by the wayside. Jungle Bookis mistitled as it references only the Mowgli stories and moves from incident to incident so quickly that the "law of the jungle" morals in Kipling's anthropomorphic fables are lost. Treasure Islandis written in a similar breakneck, choppy style, and Long John Silver, one of the most memorable characters ever created, is eminently forgettable in this telling. In 80 Days, the historic events that made such a journey even thinkable, like the opening of the Suez Canal and the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad, are never mentioned, nor is the International Date Line, which enabled Fogg to win his wager, mentioned, let alone explained. The cartoon illustrations in all three volumes border on offensive as no matter which country or culture is depicted, the dot-eyed faces are virtually identical except for minor variations in skin tone. Some illustrations make no sense, as when the action in 80 Daysdescribes the servant Passepartout at the bottom of a circus pyramid, but the picture is of a Japanese tearoom.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
From the Publisher
“The reason Verne is still read by millions today is simply that he was one of the best storytellers who ever lived.”—Arthur C. Clarke

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Atlantic Publishing, Croxley Green
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Chapter one In in which Phileas Fogg and Passepartout accept each other, the one as master, the other as man

Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814. He was one of the Most noticeable members of the Reform Club, though he seemed always to avoid attracting attention; an enigmatical personage, about whom little was known, except that he was a polished man of the world. People said that he resembled Byron-at least that his head was Byronic-, but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thousand years without growing old.

Certainly an Englishman it was more doubtful whether Phileas Fogg was a Londoner. He was never seen on 'Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the "City"; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln's Inn, or Gray's Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen's Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts. He certainly was not a manufacturer; nor was he a merchant or a gentleman farmer. His name was strange to the scientific and learned societies, and he never was known to take part in the sage deliberations of the Royal Institution or the London Institution, the Artisan's Association or the Institution of Arts and Sciences. He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the English capital, from the Harmonic to that of the Entomologists, founded mainly for the purpose of abolishing pernicious insects.

Phileas Fogg was a member of theReform, and that was all.

The way in which he got admission to this exclusive club was simple enough.

He was recommended by the Barings, with whom he had an open credit. His checks were regularly paid at sight from his account current, which was always flush.

Was Phileas Fogg rich? Undoubtedly. But those who knew him best could not imagine how he had made his fortune, and Mr. Fogg was the last person to whom to apply for the information. He was not lavish, nor, on the contrary, avaricious; for whenever he knew that money was needed for a noble, useful, or benevolent purpose, he supplied it quickly, and sometimes anonymously. He was, in short, the least communicative of men. He talked very little, and seemed all the more mysterious for his taciturn manner. His daily habits were quite open, to observation; but whatever he did was so exactly the same thing that he had always done before, that the wits of the curious were fairly puzzled.

Had he travelled? It was likely, for no one seemed to know the world more familiarly; there was no spot so secluded that he did not appear to have an intimate acquaintance with it. He often corrected, with a few clear words, the thousand conjectures advanced by members of the club as to lost and unheard-of travellers, pointing out the true probabilities, and seeming as if gifted with a sort of second sight, so often did events Justify his predictions. He must have travelled everywhere, at least in the spirit.

It was at least certain that Phileas Fogg had not absented himself from London for many years. Those who were honored by a better acquaintance with him than the rest, declared that nobody could pretend to have ever seen him anywhere else. His sole pastimes were reading the papers and playing whist. He often won at this game, which, as a silent one,, harmonized with his nature; but his winnings never went into his purse, being reserved as a fund for his charities. Mr. Fogg played, not to win, but for the sake of playing. The game was in his eyes a contest, a struggle with a difficulty, yet a motionless, unwearying struggle, congenial to his tastes.

Phileas Fogg was not known to have either wife or children, which may happen to the most honest people; either relatives or near friends, which is certainly more unusual. He lived alone in his house in Saville Row, whither none penetrated. A single domestic sufficed to serve him. He breakfasted and dined at the club, at hours mathematically fixed, in the same room, at the same table, never taking his meals with other members, much less bringing a guest with him; and went home at exactly midnight, only to retire at once to bed. He never used the cozy chambers which the Reform provides for its favored members. He passed ten hours out of the twentyfour in Saville Row, either in sleeping or making his toilet. When he chose to take a walk, it was with a regular step in the entrance hall with its mosaic flooring, or in the circular gallery with its dome supported by twenty red porphyry Ionic columns, and illumined by blue painted windows. When he breakfasted or dined, all the resources of the club-its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy—aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands, in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.

If to live in this style is to be eccentric, it must be confessed that there is something good in eccentricity!

The mansion in Saville Row, though not sumptuous, was exceedingly comfortable. The habits of its occupant were such as to demand but little from the sole domestic; but Phileas Fogg required him to be almost superhumanly prompt and regular.

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Around the World in Eighty Days (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 274 reviews.
seeGreen More than 1 year ago
I recently reread this book for this first time since I had to in school, many years ago. Although it seems a fairly simplistic read, it still has a plot, while plausible and adventures, also plausible, that kept me wanting to keep reading it and finish the entire story. Phileus Fogg and his servent Passeportout make up the main characters, almost in an odd couple styling. Traveling by any means necessary to win a bet (not the money, but the honor) they are constantly playing off of each other with their conflicting attitudes. I would recommend this for any young reader, it is a classic and easy to read and quick as well. For an older reader or an adult, in today's view it can seem simplistic and dated, and unchallenged, but it is still a great work by Jules Verne. To anyone who hasn't read it, go for it, you have nothing to lose except a couple hours in which you can be with the imagery and travel to Egypt, India, Japan, American and back to London in a simpler time, yet many of the problems put into the path of Fogg, one can relate to today in their modern versions.
Jeff Sebest More than 1 year ago
I would reccomend this book to anyone
Tonya Snyder More than 1 year ago
it was an interesting book but dont watch movie before reading.
Boys-on-a-boat More than 1 year ago
To start off, this is a classic book. If this was a badly written book, I don't think it would be a classic. Around the World in Eighty Days tells the adventures of Phileas Fogg, a man who made a wager of twenty thousand pounds that he could go all the way around the world in exactly eighty days. And sorry to say, Jackie Chan does not help him along the way. The author Jules Verne writes the book to a certain perspective that comes from almost every main character's point of veiw. In addition to the main plot, their is a suspenseful subplot in which a clever Detective Fix snoops out Mr. Fogg, who is a suspect for the theft of fifty thousand pounds! The book is rich with character developement. Phileas and his servant Passepartout show great change throughout their journey. Also, a love story evolves as Fogg meets Aouda, an Indian woman who was about to be sacrified by a thuggee tribe, until Fogg and his crew came to the rescue! Now we get to this edition of the novel. Really it adds nothing but an introduction by James Hynes. The intro is well written but unnecassary, it slows down the suspense you have when you open up to the first page. One plus to this edition is the cover illustration. It features a man in a hot air balloon and a map of the world in the background. The problem is that Phileas Fogg does not travel once in this book by hot air balloon or any form of air transportation for that matter. Over all you want to get this book. However you could probably find a much nicer edition of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly Recommended - you must check it out!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This great novel by Jules Verne is about an Englishman who makes a bet that he can travel around the world in eighty days. Jules Verne describes the protagonist's journey through the American plains in great detail but his ability to describe these legendary plains does not compare to seeing them with your own eyes. As I have already seen them, I found these sections of description rather dull. For instance when he stated that they 'observed the varied landscape which unfolded itself as they passed along; the vast prairies, the mountains lining the horizon, and the creeks with their frothy, foaming streams'. I found this not to portray the real essence of the plains as I found the plains to feel as if they go on forever. Verne's description does not show the real vastness of the plains. It does not describe a real picture of the towering mountains, plains or the streams. I would describe the plains to go on as far as the eye can see. The yellowish-brown fields surrounded by fences, stretching out for miles and miles, with no trees to be seen. I sensed a stronger feeling of being the only thing in the entire plains. His words do not seem to be expressive enough to me. In another segment along their long journey, the protagonist, Phileas Fogg, suggests that he and his friends rescue an Indian princess from death. This is a courageous act on his part and on the part of his partners. They secretly hide behind bushes near the large group of people where the princess is to be burned alive next to her dead husband. They attempt to break into the room where the unconscious princess is hidden but have to rush back to their hiding spot to escape from the guards. At dawn, just before the princess is to be killed, Passepartout, the courageous, brave, servant of Phileas Fogg, inconspicuously races up to the princess. Then, waiting for the right moment, he jumps up out of the flames where her dead husband lies, saves the princess, creating the illusion that the Prince returned to the living and rescued his wife. This act shows Passepartout's bravery and courage. Passepartout, without any second thoughts, risked his life for the princess he had never met before. This act is very courageous indeed. Jules Verne's ability to portray a character's thoughts and actions through his writings, as was just demonstrated, makes this book of great value. This is a great book because it shows you what things are like in different parts of the world, as I described in the previous paragraphs. It has a thrilling, adventurous plot, along with characters that are almost real. All these ingredients put together make a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Haha this book was nothing like the movie... it was even better!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book! It is a bit slow at first, but give it a few chapters and you'll really get into it. Also, as opposed o most free books, it is not so full of typos that you can hardly read it. There are a few but not many.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Phileas Fogg, a somewhat rich London man makes a bet of 20000 euros with the people of the reform club that he could travel around the world in 80 days. While he does that, the reform club makes him look guilty and a spy is chasing him. He used lots of different types of tools to travel including some that you don’t see often. One of the transportation tools that I thought was interesting was a wagon powered by wind. I thought that Phileas is really stupid to make that bet because at last, he only gains a profit of about 200 euros while arriving at the last second and sacrificing a several dogs promising a taxi driver 200 euros. Around the world in 80 days is a very interesting book. I would suggest this book to anyone who enjoys adventurous books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think the descriptions of the charectors are nery good and i reccomend this book to anyone with a thirst of adventure and does not mind all the punctual errors and for it being old timey. I also reccomend the movie. Just search , around the world in eighty days staring jackie chan. :3
Nautilus More than 1 year ago
The daring quest of Phileas Fogg to travel the world within 80 days with twenty-thousand pounds sterlings of his fortune at stake that comes down to the wire. It is definitely one of those books that everyone should read within their life time.
Mariamosis More than 1 year ago
Contrary to what many people (who have not read this book) believe and despite the cover of many printings of this book: There is NO hot-air-balloon in this book. This false belief has been instilled in us through modern media. However, without the hot-air-balloon and bullfighting (?), this book is still a fascinating tale of adventure. Even so, if you are looking for a quick fix for a book report I encourage the reader to go beyond the illustrated cover and movie to find a copy of Jule's Verne's "Around the World in Eighty Days" and read it. And furthermore, SparkNotes should be reviewed in hindsight.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jules Verne¿s Around the World in Eighty Days, Phileas Fogg begins his journey in London and travels throughout the world. Fogg makes a wager of 20,000 pounds that he can travel the world in eighty days. Passepartout, his servant travels alongside him with Detective Fix close on their trail because he suspects that Fogg is the robber of the Bank of England. Their fast paced journey takes them through many obstacles like battling with Indians, racing through the jungle, and saving the beautiful princess Aouda. Personally I thought this novel was quite a good book. It was very creative, I enjoyed reading it, and it kept me on my toes throughout the whole book. I thought it was very exciting because there was one obstacle after the next and they never seemed to stop the race against time. The only thing I did not like about this novel is that Jules Verne puts so much detail about the setting and cultures that Fogg visits, it starts to get boring in some places.I would recommend this book to anybody who likes adventures and to people who like to learn about the different places around the world. I think this book is a good read for people of all ages and is packed with action, suspense, and adventure in this trip around the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne is a story about a man named Phileas Fogg who lived by a routine schedule. Fogg had just fired his man servant for not bringing him his water for shaving at the right temperature of 86 degrees Fahrenheit but instead at 84 degrees Fahrenheit. Fogg gets another man servant named Jean Passepartout who is going to travel around the world in eighty days with Mr. Fogg but does not know it yet. The bet all started when Phileas Fogg went to the Reform Club for his daily routine. He had his meal, read, had his meal, and then played whist with his fellow reform members. The other reform members are debating on whether of not the thief who stole money from the Bank of London could escape easily. That is when Phileas Fogg says that it is possible, and bets half of his fortune-20,000 pounds- that it is possible. He walks calmly home and tells Passepartout to get everything ready in 10 minutes because they are leaving for Dover and Calais. Fogg and Passepartout go on their way, but Detective Fix wishes to arrest Phileas Fogg because he thinks Fogg robbed the Bank of London. They face many difficulties, but Phileas Fogg still had his confidence and calm ways. From trains to ships to an elephant, from being beaten for wearing shoes in a sacred place by accident to saving damsels in distress from being sacrificed all the way to being attacked on a train by the Souix. Jules Verne does a beautiful job describing the beauty and the horror of the countries Fogg, Passepartout, and Aouda face off against. I really enjoyed this book because it had comedy, adventure, and science involved in the lives of many people, and how one man set out to show that it was possible to go around the world in eighty days and the other a servant along for the ride.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This marvelous book by Jules Verne is a must for every book lover everywhere! Mr. Phileas Fogg, an English gentleman, sets his whole life to the time of his watch. Every morning he gets up and goes to the reform club to play cards with his chums. Well one day, his friends and Phileas Fogg gets into a discussion and out of nowhere he bets his whole life savings he can make it around the world in 80 days. It was thought to be impossible by everyone but Phileas Fogg as determined to prove everyone wrong. So right away his new servant, Mr. Passepartout, and Phileas Fogg set out on their very exciting adventure around the world. The only thing that can stop them now is a detective, Detective Fix, who thinks that Mr. Phileas Fogg is the man that robbed a bank in London. Mr. Fix travels on his adventure to stop him at all cost. I am not going to give out anything else about they¿re daring, ride around the world but your sure can bet it is going to be very exciting. I believe this was a very interesting tale from beginning to end with a bunch of surprises along the way such as an Indian princess that will be killed if Mr. Fogg doesn¿t put a foot in to stop it. You never know what Jules Verne had up his sleeve every turning of the page, you knew it was going to be good but never knew what. After the first two chapters I never put it down to the end! This was certainly a book that kept you on the edge of your seat with every word read. I think his setting of the 1800¿s and the English characters certainly added a little something to the mix to make it even better! All of his characters had there own special place in the story, which made it all come together. Also how he used the language of that time period made you feel like you was in the 1800¿s in the reform club talking about his adventure with Mr. Fogg. Then he used a lot of different things to make you feel like you were right there on Mr. Phileas Fogg¿s right side. All of this made this book one of the best I have every read. All in all, this was a wonderful book that I think was very exciting and mysterious all in one! I defiantly think anyone who is thinking about reading this book should and even if you aren¿t still read it. I know that after the first two chapters you will be hooked like I was!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the novel, Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne, Phileas Fogg a determined Englishman, made a possibly life changing bet with his cronies. He bet that he could travel the entire globe in 80 days. Many people believed that Mr. Fogg could not circumnavigate the world in such a short period of time. I thought that this challenge could be met if everything could be perfectly executed. then the probability of an accident or mishap came to mind and just one problem could throw the whole schedule off track. Phileas Fogg had the trip planned out, even with the probability of an accident in mind. Could he make the journey and reach London to recieve his money at quarter to nine in the evening on December 21st? I had my doubts in the man's plan just like many other readers. With great determination, Phileas Fogg set out on his trek around the world. Mr. Fogg traveled with his gracious servant Passepartout close to his side and a snoopy detective, Mr. Fix, hot on his trail. Mr. Fogg had been accused of robbing a bank in England. Mr. Fix, planning to arrest Phileas Fogg in India, was averted due to the delay of the warrant. The three traveled to India, saving a beautiful princess from her death, and on to China and Japan. Inconveniences occured with delay, the travelers missing a steamer after steamer they needed to take in order to make time. Aouda, the princess, now accompanied the three. They wisked across teh Pacific onto trains in the United States. When a band of Sioux Indians attacked the train, they took Passepartout prisoner. Mr. Fogg retrieved his servent and continued on their journey. With the undying determination that kept the travelers on their way, and ventured onto the Atlantic Ocean. In England, Fix arrested Mr. Fogg not knowing the robber had been caught. Phileas Fogg and his companions arrived in London thinking they were late. The catch was that they were a day early, thus making the journey around the world in eight days. He didn't lose or gain any money but did take Aouda as his wife. Mr. Fogg kept his calm and keen composure throughout the journey. He dismissed his orderly ways after finding out he had been late. This was one of the only changes that Phileas Fogg went through on his journey. I thought this story was excellent inteh way Jules Verne presented the world as Phileas Fogg traveled upon it. I enjoyed reading the novel and understanding the many different ways of life throughout the world. I would recommend this novel to anybody who wants to read an entertaining novel about many different parts of the world.
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Anonymous 10 months ago
Please l am very active and have good grammer.
Anonymous 10 months ago
Is Flintkit taken?
Anonymous 10 months ago
How lazy can you be to not even spell out each word to write a review on a book you haven't even read? Not every word has to be abbrieviated. That's why letters exist. You know, so you can write words in an actual language that people can understand. Can you even spell the whole words correctly? Or are you so dumb and lazy that you just abbrieviate words because you can't spell them? I hope you enjoyed this book.
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very good read
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