Arrowsmith

Arrowsmith

4.2 5
by Sinclair Lewis
     
 

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Harry Sinclair Lewis (7th February, 1885 – 10th January, 1951) was the first American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1930 "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humour, new types of characters." Whilst an accurate description of his writing it misses the tone and central theme of his work which is… See more details below

Overview

Harry Sinclair Lewis (7th February, 1885 – 10th January, 1951) was the first American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1930 "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humour, new types of characters." Whilst an accurate description of his writing it misses the tone and central theme of his work which is clearer from his own words in accepting the Prize: “America is the most contradictory, the most depressing, the most stirring, of any land in the world today” and on American literary establishment: "Our American professors like their literature clear and cold and pure and very dead." Lewis was no stranger to literary prizes as Arrowsmith, regarded as his best novel, won the 1926 Pullitzer Prize. More unusually, he refused to accept the Prize stating that the criteria to represent the highest standard of “the wholesome atmosphere of American Life” was meaningless. As Arrowsmith was a social commentary on the contemporary state of medicine and as Lewis was a satirist of modern America the Prize was not welcome. Although the protagonist is a scientific researcher another main character is a small town doctor as Lewis’s father had been. The book describes many aspects of medical training and practise, scientific research that benefits mankind, ethics, integrity, dedication, selfless devotion to the care of patients as well as greed, self deception, stupidity, and the attraction for power, wealth, security and recognition. It has inspired generations of med students round the world and a 1931 Hollywood movie directed by John Ford and nominated for four Oscars. However, it is widely agreed that the original work contained here is the best way to sample the author that many claim has had a greater impact on modern American life than Hemingway, Fitzgerald or Faulkner

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Editorial Reviews

henry Longan Stuart
One closes the novel with a feeling that, if eternal verities be the ultimate objective, no great progress has been made. Mr. Lewis has attacked spiritedly, but he has not advanced. -- Books of the Century; New York Times review, March 1925

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780008929
Publisher:
Deadtree Publishing
Publication date:
04/24/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
134,200
File size:
0 MB

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Meet the Author

Harry Sinclair Lewis (1885–1951) was born in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, the son of a country doctor. After graduating from Yale in 1907, he went to New York, tried freelance work for a time, and then worked in a variety of editorial positions from the East Coast to California. Main Street (1920) was his first successful novel. In the decade that followed, Lewis published four other acclaimed novels of social criticism—Babbitt (1922), Arrowsmith (1925), Elmer Gantry (1927), and Dodsworth (1929). In 1930 he became the first American to win the Nobel Prize for literature. He continued to write both novels and plays for another two decades, publishing his last work, World So Wide (1951), shortly before his death in Rome.

Sally E. Parry is Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, and Director of General Education at Illinois State University. She is currently the Executive Director of the Sinclair Lewis Society and editor of the Sinclair Lewis Society Newsletter. She has edited two collections of short stories by Sinclair Lewis, Go East, Young Man: Sinclair Lewis on Class in America (2005) and The Minnesota Stories of Sinclair Lewis (2005), and with Robert L. McLaughlin, written We’ll Always Have the Movies: American Cinema During World War II (2006). 

E. L. Doctorow is one of America’s preeminent men of letters. His novels include The Waterworks, Ragtime, The Book of Daniel, Loon Lake, World’s Fair, Lives of the Poets, Billy Bathgate, and Welcome to Hard Times. His work has garnered the National Book Critics Circle Award twice, the National Book Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award, the Edith Wharton Citation for Fiction, and the William Dean Howells medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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