×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

ART 123: Count from 1 to 12 with Great Works of Art
     

ART 123: Count from 1 to 12 with Great Works of Art

by Stefano Zuffi
 

Children will learn to count from 1 to 12 while looking at fine art masterpieces in this lively new book. Cats by Gainsborough, boats by Van Gogh, a circle of dancers by Matisse, a king and queen sculpted by Henry Moore—they’re all here to encourage counting and to introduce the fascinating world of art. A short rhyme perfect for reading aloud

Overview

Children will learn to count from 1 to 12 while looking at fine art masterpieces in this lively new book. Cats by Gainsborough, boats by Van Gogh, a circle of dancers by Matisse, a king and queen sculpted by Henry Moore—they’re all here to encourage counting and to introduce the fascinating world of art. A short rhyme perfect for reading aloud accompanies each illustration, helping children find the objects to count. Art 123 is a great book for all art lovers

Praise for ART 123
Zuffi provides a puzzlelike approach to counting objects in selected works of art. Readers can count from 1 to 12 in the first dozen artworks and then jump to counting "so many" in the final selection. Each piece appears opposite a pertinent rhyming sentence or two and large bold numerals indicating how many items to find in each picture. Some can be challenging to locate. Readers count people, kittens, sun rays, shapes, boats, flowers. . . . .Hopper, Matisse, Van Gogh, and Renoir are among the featured painters. This picture book works well as a concept book and as a resource for stimulating art appreciation. Because the size of the images varies, Art 123 would be best used for one-on-one sharing. It is a worthy extra purchase for libraries needing more counting or art-appreciation materials.–Lynn Vanca, Freelance Librarian, Akron, OH, School Library Journal

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From Caravaggio to Lichtenstein, this enriching counting book features a different work of Western art for numbers one through 12, accompanied by a brief, descriptive rhyme: "In the dark and lonely night,/ 4 people stay together in the light," Zuffi writes of Hopper's "Nighthawks." For Mondrian's more abstract "Tableau No IV," he writes: "10 Squares, triangles, rectangles too./ I see 10 in all,/ how about you?" In addition to introducing numbers and counting, the book works well as a basic primer on viewing (and thinking about) art. All ages. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Zuffi provides a puzzlelike approach to counting objects in selected works of art. Readers can count from 1 to 12 in the first dozen artworks and then jump to counting "so many" in the final selection. Each piece appears opposite a pertinent rhyming sentence or two and large bold numerals indicating how many items to find in each picture. Some can be challenging to locate. Readers count people, kittens, sun rays, shapes, boats, flowers. Also paired opposite the artworks are the titles of the works, the names of the artists, and the location of the pieces. Finger positions on silhouetted hands, placed on the numeral page, reinforce the number of objects to find. Hopper, Matisse, Van Gogh, and Renoir are among the featured painters. This picture book works well as a concept book and as a resource for stimulating art appreciation. Other titles with a similar approach include Glorina Taborin's Norman Rockwell's Counting Book (Abrams, 1977) and Lucy Micklethwait's I Spy Two Eyes: Numbers in Art (Greenwillow, 1993). Because the size of the images varies, Art 123 would be best used for one-on-one sharing. It is a worthy extra purchase for libraries needing more counting or art-appreciation materials.—Lynn Vanca, Freelance Librarian, Akron, OH
Kirkus Reviews

Milan-based Zuffi mines art masterpieces in aid of early learning, leaving his usual audience of adult art lovers behind for this effort.

Here he helps youngsters reinforce their counting skills even as he exposes them to artworks ranging from the Renaissance to pop art. In a handsome and elegant squared-off format, he pairs 13 works by greats like Henry Moore (the emblematic King and Queen, ca. 1952-53) with a corresponding numeral (2) and offers a telling, enagaging rhyme: "Good afternoon, my king, my queen. / Are you enjoying this winter scene?" Favorite and accessible works include Caravaggio's three (3)Cardsharps, Edward Hopper's four (4) Nighthawks, HenriMatisse's five (5) figures engaged in a bold, exuberant Dance and Pierre-Auguste Renoir's twelve (12) guests enjoying a languid summer Luncheon of the Boating Party. The rhymes are every bit as affecting as the art: Thomas Gainsborough'scharming,soft, crayon drawing,Six Studies of a Cat,is paired with "6 / lazy kittens on the floor. / Some stretch and curl, / others sleep some more." (Oh, and that 13th work? "So many men in hats falling from the sky" in René Magritte's Golconda.)

This handsome entry will particularly please art-loving parents. (Picture book. 3-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419701009
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2011
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Stefano Zuffi is a well-known art historian and the author of some sixty books on art and art history, including Abrams’ The Cat in Art, Art in Venice, and How to Read Italian Renaissance Painting. He has appeared in art-related television programs and on DVDs. He lives in Milan.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews