Art and Affection: A Life of Virginia Woolf / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (45) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $50.00   
  • Used (44) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(187)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview


More than fifty-five years after her death, Virginia Woolf remains a haunting figure, a woman whose life was both brilliantly successful and profoundly tragic. As the author of Mrs Dalloway, To The Lighthouse, The Waves, Orlando, and Between the Acts, she helped reinvent the novel for the modernist era. And through A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, and other writings, she continues to inform feminist thought. Yet this supremely gifted woman of letters endured crippling bouts of depression--the incandescent artist who captivated some of the most noted men and women of her time died alone, wading out into the depths of the river Ouse to drown, hoping to find "rest on the floor of the sea." Until now, we have had no adequate explanation of why she did so.
In this bold and compassionate new biography, Panthea Reid at last weaves together the diverse strands of Virginia Woolf's life and career. In lucid and often poetic prose, she offers a dazzlingly complete portrait that is essential to our reading of Woolf. Rich in detail and imaginative insight, Art and Affection meticulously documents how the twin desires to write and to be loved drove Woolf all her life. Drawing on a wealth of original documents, many unfamiliar and heretofore unpublished, including the surviving letters of Woolf's parents and grandmother, the vast collections of letters written among Bloomsbury friends and acquaintances, the manuscripts of Woolf's writing, her suicide notes, and other sources, Reid allows Woolf and her intimates to speak for themselves.
Her findings correct many misconceptions about Woolf's upbringing and her most significant relationships. She reveals, for instance, that recent reports of sexual abuse in Woolf's childhood have been exaggerated--that while the writer was sexually traumatized by her half-brothers and emotionally scarred by her father, she was most deeply wounded by the neglect of her mother (often depicted as the very model of Victorian maternal devotion) and by her love for and rivalry with her sister, the painter Vanessa Bell. Reid describes the competition between the sisters that became for Virginia a contest between their arts, the pen versus the brush. The effects of this rivalry were not uniformly negative--Reid shows that Virginia's jealous preoccupation with modern painting sparked her own aesthetic vision and experimentation with written forms--but the end results were tragic. Virginia's flirtation with Vanessa's husband, carefully documented here, so alienated her sister that after 1910 Virginia never again felt secure of Vanessa's affection. Reid presents powerful evidence that fear of losing both Vanessa's love and her own writing gift ultimately triggered Woolf's final suicidal depression. She also reevaluates Virginia's marriage to the writer and publisher Leonard Woolf. Reid also finds that Leonard was surprisingly supportive of Virginia's erotic relationship with Vita Sackville-West and that his constant devotion provided Virginia with the secure emotional soil in which art and affection could flourish and she could keep at bay, until her fifty-ninth year, the demons of manic-depression. Reid shows how, until the end, Virginia Woolf's own "insatiable desire to write something before I die" most sustained her.
Brimming with new revelations and graced with sixty-six rare photographs and illustrations, Art and Affection is the definitive new account of the triumphs and tragedies that molded Virginia Woolf into one of the most original voices in modern literature.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Art and Affection delves into the divided emotions that informed Woolf's personal relationships, her aesthetic values, her feminism, her fiction-her life. Reid, a professor of English at Louisiana State University, makes excellent use of previous work and her own research, lending psychological depth and narrative coherence to Woolf's complicated investment in writing as living itself. The biographical origins of Woolf's quarreling consciousness have been examined before: her conflicted relationships with her revered, but distant mother and with her intellectually driven but tyrannical father; her adoration of and antagonism with her older sister, Vanessa; the sexual crises of her youth; and, of course, her manic-depression. Reid weighs in convincingly on enduring concerns, including the extent of childhood sexual abuse; Woolf's adult sexuality; her rivalries with Vanessa; and her liaisons with several of the most eminent men and women of the British avant-garde. But Reid's greatest contribution is in the way she provides real psychological grounding for Woolf's artistic choices, such as her departure ``from conventional representation values'' or her ``ambivalence about the choice between activism and aestheticism.'' Using intricate detail and a knowing hand, Reid helps readers to understand a nearly unimaginable life and mind. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Reid (English, Louisiana State Univ.) has written a sensitive and meticulous biography that centers on Woolf's dual desires to write and secure love. She rejects earlier studies (e.g., Louise DeSalvo's Virginia Woolf, LJ 5/1/89) claiming that Woolf was a victim of continual sexual abuse. Rather, Reid argues that a greater impact on Woolf was the lack of maternal love and a lifelong rivalry with her sister, Vanessa Bell. Reid deftly traces Woolf's struggle with her aesthetic vision and experimentation in an era when a woman writer was not taken seriously. The fear of losing her ability to write and Vanessa's love led to bouts of depression and eventual suicide. Reid corrects misconceptions of Leonard Woolf's role in Virginia's life by showing him to be a great stabilizing and supportive influence. For a more literary focus, see James King's Virginia Woolf (LJ 4/1/95) and Lyndall Gordon's Virginia Woolf: A Writer's Life (Norton, 1993). Reid's work should prove a valuable contribution to ongoing interest in Woolf's life.Ronald Ratliff, Chapman H.S., Kan.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195101959
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 12/12/1996
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 570
  • Product dimensions: 6.58 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 1.88 (d)

Meet the Author

Panthea Reid is Professor of English at LSU. Under the name "Panthea Reid Broughton," she is author of a book on William Faulkner and editor of one on Walker Percy.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)