Art and Knowledge

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Overview

Almost all of us would agree that the experience of art is deeply rewarding. Why this is the case remains a puzzle; nor does it explain why many of us find works of art much more important than other sources of pleasure. Art and Knowledge argues that the experience of art is so rewarding because it can be an important source of knowledge about ourselves and our relation to each other and to the world. The view that art is a source of knowledge can be traced as far back as Aristotle and Horace. Artists as various as Tasso, Sidney, Henry James and Mendelssohn have believed that art contributes to knowledge. As attractive as this view may be, it has never been satisfactorily defended, either by artists or philosophers. Art and Knowledge reflects on the essence of art and argues that it ought to provide insight as well as pleasure. It argues that all the arts, including music, are importantly representational. This kind of representation is fundamentally different from that found in the sciences, but it can provide insights as important and profound as available from the sciences. Once we recognise that works of art can contribute to knowledge we can avoid thorough relativism about aesthetic value and we can be in a position to evaluate the avant-garde art of the past 100 years. Art and Knowledge is an exceptionally clear and interesting, as well as controversial, exploration of what art is and why it is valuable. It will be of interest to all philosophers of art, artists and art critics.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415256476
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 10/28/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
1 What is art? 1
Definitions of art 1
The relativity of arthood 4
Defining art responsibly 10
Why art ought to have cognitive value 17
2 On representation 23
What is representation? 23
Types of representation 26
The representation of types 34
Visual art and semantic representation 38
Representation in literature 44
Representation in music: I 52
Representation in music: II 60
3 Art as inquiry 65
Ways to knowledge 65
Rejected alternatives 70
Interpretive illustration 80
Affective illustration and knowledge 88
What can be learned from art? 94
Replies to objections 104
Cognitive value and the experience of art 109
4 Evaluation of art 114
Relativism and aesthetic value 114
The extent of aesthetic relativism 121
Criteria of evaluation 126
5 Avant-garde art and knowledge 135
What is avant-garde art? 135
Exemplification and avant-garde art 140
The semantics of avant-garde art 144
But is it art? 154
Destroying works of avant-garde art 160
Envoy 166
Notes 168
Bibliography 174
Index 178
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