Art and Otherness: Crisis in Cultural Identity

Overview

Following the acclaimed "Art & Discontent," Thomas McEvilley argues in "Art & Otherness" for an advanced anthropological perspective that contravenes conventional thinking in the visual arts, and leads to a concept of artistic globalization. The description of Western culture as superior and in opposition to other cultures of the world preoccupied our aesthetic philosophy for at least 200 years, whether or not explicitly stated. That argument was undertaken in various guises, especially as the historical ...
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Overview

Following the acclaimed "Art & Discontent," Thomas McEvilley argues in "Art & Otherness" for an advanced anthropological perspective that contravenes conventional thinking in the visual arts, and leads to a concept of artistic globalization. The description of Western culture as superior and in opposition to other cultures of the world preoccupied our aesthetic philosophy for at least 200 years, whether or not explicitly stated. That argument was undertaken in various guises, especially as the historical determinism of Hegel which proposed to quantify human 'progress.' Recently, however, the term 'multiculturalism' has come to signify a post-Modern understanding of how visual arts transgress artificial boundaries, and of how there may now exist, perhaps for the first time in history, a post-colonial globalism in the arts freed of ethnocentric value judgements.... llustrating his argument by drawing upon an array of sources and cultures, Thomas McEvilley demonstrates that the post-Modern crisis in cultural identity demands an imaginative, integrating response.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
McEvilley views multiculturalism in the visual arts as a positive force, part of a historic process of decolonialization, as Third World and Eastern European countries struggle to reconstruct their cultural identities. In 10 invigorating essays previously pubished in Artforum, ART/artifact and elsewhere, he assails formalist modernism as a moribund project and seeks ways of relating to the culturally ``other'' free of Eurocentric bias. Beginning with a slashing critique of a 1984 exhibition on primitivism at Manhattan's Museum of Modern Art, McEvilley, a contributing editor to Artforum, goes on to consider the reception of African art in the West, postmodernism as a ``global pluralization'' of art, contemporary exhibition strategies and how painters in India have oscillated between Western-style individualism and the weight of collective tradition. Despite some overlap, these erudite essays reward and challenge with their overarching vision of a global artistic culture. (June)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780929701486
  • Publisher: McPherson & Company
  • Publication date: 7/28/1992
  • Pages: 174
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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