Art in History / Edition 1

Art in History / Edition 1

by Larry Silver
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1558596054

ISBN-13: 2901558596053

Pub. Date: 07/28/1993

Publisher: Abbeville Publishing Group

Art In History provides an illuminating overview of humanity's long tradition of creation, from the earliest cave paintings to contemporary installations.

By relating works of art--primarily painting, sculpture, and graphics, but also major architectural monuments--to the societies in which they were created, Dr. Silver intensifies the reader's understanding of

Overview

Art In History provides an illuminating overview of humanity's long tradition of creation, from the earliest cave paintings to contemporary installations.

By relating works of art--primarily painting, sculpture, and graphics, but also major architectural monuments--to the societies in which they were created, Dr. Silver intensifies the reader's understanding of humanity's most famous and enduring images. Each chapter surveys a historical era, presenting its major figures against the background of social forces that helped shape their creativity. Non-Westen cultures are included as counter-points to the main narrative, and a careful balance is established between long-acknowledged masters and previously undervalued artists, including women, whose achievements have been recognized more recently.

Other Details: More than 600 illustrations, 213 in full color, with 24 plans and 7 maps 496 pages 8 1/2 x 8 1/2" Published 1993

discuss some major moments of cultures outside the "mainstream" of Europe that dominates art history in museums and academies today.

These "Views from Outside" do not purport to be comprehensive. It is insulting and token to find single chapters on "Far Eastern Art" or "Primitive Alternatives" inserted into most survey volumes, as if those cultures could still be covered comprehensively in a single chapter, even in a similar volume that lumped them all together like those chapters. Here the solution to this impossible problem derives from the same principles as the text on European art: to concentrate on a more limited historical moment important to the overall tradition, but not to claim inclusiveness. Just as this book as a whole hopes to undermine any illusion of comprehensiveness through its lengthier expositions and more limited examples, so do its "case studies" from other cultural traditions (including Soviet Russia and America as well as Africa, Asia, and Central America) attempt to provide a strong period flavor. They also invite any cross-cultural comparisons as well as contrasts that the reader might deem to be appropriate. These "non-Western" case studies remain quite specific. By limiting the focus, the few pages that are reserved for each account of non-European art can go into greater depth on their objects of study than any other conventional survey text. For example, the Renaissance era turns its attention to Aztec Mexico and to ancient Nigeria, Ife and Benin. Those two accounts in particular will be picked up again in the twentieth-century period, because the more recent tradition of Mexican muralists and Yoruba carvers has had an appreciable cultural effect, not only in its own region, but also in modern America (the United States as part of the larger Americas, Hispanic as well as Creole).

Whereas the author has striven to incorporate decorative (or applied) arts (still pejorative-sounding terms but better than the former derisive phrase "minor arts") as well as printmaking and photography within the overall narrative, current museum bias in favor of easel painting and sculpture has nonetheless dictated the predominance of those two media throughout this text. There have been modifications according to specific cultures, however, especially older ones. In this text, architecture often appears in its encompassing role as a comprehensive cultural program, as in the case of the Acropolis in Athens or Chartres cathedral or St. Peter's in Rome--or Todai-ji in Nara.

This text will focus on centers of power and wealth. Hence important artists in provincial regions relative to political power may not always receive attention proportional to their merits, because at this point the narrative attends to London and Paris (and to a lesser extent Berlin) during the modern era, or Florence and Rome (and to a lesser extent Venice) during the Italian Renaissance. Kings and popes as well as the great urban centers inevitably loom large in a book devoted to a contextual study of public art. (This does not mean that important regional or pre-urban cultures do not deserve study. The glories of prehistoric caves or Scythian gold or Hiberno-Saxon manuscripts immediately evoke justified attention, but they do not figure here.)

Attentive readers of this book will perhaps note a disproportionate number of objects from the Art Institute of Chicago. The reasons are simple. The author lives and works in Chicago, and the Art Institute is a great museum, particularly for works after 1800. Such familiar and local works form the backbone of any author's experience of the history of art, and it is to be hoped that an instructor using this text to teach will also localize some of its Chicago-based observations with examples available to students on a first-hand basis. There can be no substitute for the actual experience of the size, the texture, the very materiality of an artwork; no slides or reproductions in this book (or even digitized simulacra) should obscure that basic fact. So the Art Institute and all other institutions and collections that own these objects should be thanked, not only for permission to reproduce them, but also for their custodianship, and their permission to readers to visit and view. A conscious effort has been made by the author to support such public institutions by choosing works from their collection rather than objects in private hands.

Writing such a book, especially with an interest in culture and context rather than formal description, is a demanding task; it has been instructive in its own right. As one learns when attempting to practice an art rather than analyzing and criticizing it, doing something yourself is much tougher than kibbitzing about it. Thus chastened, the author now has much greater respect for all of his predecessors in this endeavour than he did before attempting to improve on their precedents. That admiration is all the greater for the finest practitioners of this difficult, often thankless task. Like classics of other kinds, even artworks, classic introductions to art history like those of Janson and Gombrich have become classics for a reason, and the recent achievements of authors such as Hartt, Honour and Fleming, and Wilkins and Schultz provide worthy competition to them.

This volume aims to provide an introduction to the means by which art functions in and for its culture, while providing a visual primer of images saturated in the significance of their distinctive epochs. It also aims to retain a balance between the Eurocentric heritage of the modern art world, while acknowledging the power and the inherent interest of other contributors to that heritage--from Africa, from Mexico, and from Asia. Even the small section on Islamic Asia is offered in the hope of understanding--instead of the traditional, unfamiliar, demonic adversary usually offered, from the Crusades to Desert Storm. But every project has its limits, and this Preface should observe some limits, too.

Bernini and the Sun King

French Classicism

Poussin

The Palace of Versailles

Painted Magnificence: Würzburg

Neumann

Tiepolo

Capitalism and Calvinism: Holland

Bruegel

Civic Portraiture: Rembrandt

Self-Portraits

Rembrandt and Religion

Church Interiors

Scenic Vistas

Van Ruisdael

Vermeer

Domestic Scenes

Steen

Emmanuel de Witte

Still-life Painting

View from Outside

Imperial Islam--Isfahan and India

Islamic Architecture in Persia

Illuminated Manuscripts in Persia

Persian Miniatures

Mughal Art and Architecture

Fatehpur Sikri

7. Dawn of the Modern Era

Age of Enlightenment

Hogarth

Portraiture and Landscape

The Classical Heritage

Syon House

The Royal Academy

Joshua Reynolds

Angelica Kauffmann

Benjamin West

Art and Revolution

Houdon

Thomas Jefferson and the Architecture of the New Nation

Neoclassicism in France

Canova

David and History Painting

Images of Napoleon

Rebellion and History

Goya

Goya and the Disasters of War

Turner: Nature's Grandeur and Empire's Demise

Turner and Modernity

Constable and Rural England

The Romantic Landscape in Germany: Friedrich

The Gothic Revival and Other Historicisms

Schinkel

Pugin

Orientalism in France

Eugène Delacroix

8. Nature and Novelty

Paris: Modern City

Paris Opera

Iron Architecture

Daumier

Rural Realism: Courbet

"The Painter of Modern Life": Manet

Capturing the Impression: Monet

Morisot

Impressionists at Argenteuil

City Boulevards

Photography: Pencil of Nature

View from Outside

Chicago, America, and Americans Abroad

Landscape

Bierstadt

American Photographers

Americans in Europe

Whistler

Japonisme

Cassatt

Rebuilding Chicago

The Marshall Field Store

Sullivan

Domestic Architecture: Wright

Sense and Sensibilities

Seurat

Cezanne

Emotion Through Form: Van Gogh

Escape to the Primitive: Gauguin

The Sculpture of Rodin

The Balzac Monument

Edward Steichen

Art Nouveau

Victor Horta

Josef Hoffmann: The Palais Stoclet

9. In Search of Modernity

Endless Experiment--Paris

Cubism

Collage

"Luxury, Calm, and Voluptuousness": Matisse

Sculpture as Form: Brancusi

The Search for a Pure Geometry

Mondrian

Le Corbusier

The Villa Savoye

View from Outside

Modernizing America--New York Circles

Stieglitz and Gallery '291'

Marsden Hartley

Georgia O'Keeffe

Edward Weston

Critique of Unreason: Germany and World War I

Expressionism

Munich

Schiele

Kandinsky and the "Blue Rider"

The Impact of War: Beckmann

Art and Anti-Art: Dadaism

The Bauhaus

Mies van der Rohe

Paul Klee

View from Outside

Revolutionary Russia, 1917

Art as "Agitprop"

El Lissitzky

Liubov Popova

Problems in Paris

De Chirico

Duchamp

Duchamp's Large Glass

Surrealist Art

Joan Miro

Alexander Calder

Picasso: Variations

Minotauromachy

Picasso: Guernica

Expressionist Imagery

View from Outside

Modern Mexico

Jose Clemente Orozco

Diego Rivera

The History and Future of Mexico

Frida Kahlo

View from Outside

Modern Nigeria (Yoruba), West Africa

The Doorpost

Yoruba Community Life

10. World War II to Present

Sublime and Secular: New York

The New York School

Barnett Newman

Mark Rothko

Arshile Gorky

Jackson Pollock

Drip Paintings

The "Rothko Chapel"

The Abstract in Sculpture

Seymour Lipton

Purity in Architecture: Mies van der Rohe

"Post-Painterly Abstraction"

Frank Stella

Analytical Paradoxes: Jasper Johns

Robert Rauschenberg

Pop Art

Roy Lichtenstein

Claes Oldenburg

Andy Warhol

After Modernism

Art in Action: Beuys

Eva Hesse

Environmental Art

Edward Kienholz

African-American Artworks

Political Art

Anselm Kiefer

Hans Haacke

Feminist Art

Barbara Kruger

Audrey Flack

Return to Representation

David Hockney

Jennifer Bartlett

American Archetype: Guston

New Directions

Monumental Art

Modern to Postmodern in Architecture: The New Museum

The Pompidou Center

The Kimbell Museum

Stuttgart Staatsgalerie

Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery

Postmodernism

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

Author Biography: Dr. Larry Silver, president of the College Art Association, teaches art history at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. he lives in Evanston.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901558596053
Publisher:
Abbeville Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/28/1993
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
496

Table of Contents

Preface

Map

1. Introduction: The Role of the Artists

Status of the Artist: Craftsman or Gentleman?

The Art of Painting

The Artist as Critic

The Independent Artist

Earliest Artists

2. Ancient Ancestors

View from Outside

Egypt and Assyria

Ancient Egypt

The Pyramids

Egyptian Sculpture

The New Kingdom

Tut-Ankh-Amen

Assyria

Ishtar Gate, Babylon

Grecian Glories

The Greek Temple

Doric Temples: Olympia and Delphi

Olympia

The Oracle of Apollo at Delphi

Greek Painting

Polygnotus

Greek Sculpture and Architecture

Polykleitos of Argos

The Acropolis

The Parthenon

The Parthenon Frieze

The Erechtheion

Hellenism

Skopas of Paros

Praxiteles

Art for Alexander

Lysippos

Battle of Issus

Pergamon: The Legacy of Alexander

Altar of Zeus

Laocooen

Rome: From Republic to Empire

Greek and Etruscan Sources

Temple of Fortuna Virilis

Roman Republican Portraits

The Empire of Augustus

Ara Pacis

Roman Domestic Art

Imperial Grandeur

The Colosseum

The Arch of Titus

Trajan's Column

The Pantheon

The Statue of Marcus Aurelius

The Empire in Decline

3. Christian Culture

Christian Empires

Rome: The Western Tradition

Internal Decoration

Funerary Monuments

Ravenna

Constantinople: The Eastern Tradition

Hagia Sophia

San Marco

St. Savior in Chora

Charlemagne and the Carolingians

Illuminated Manuscripts

Pilgrims and Power

Churches of the Pilgrimage Routes

St. Sernin

Ste. Madeleine at Vezelay

Royal Monastic Foundations

St. Etienne

St. Denis

The Gothic Style: Chartres

Stained Glass

Viewfrom Outside

Nara, Medieval Japan

The Kei School

View from Outside

Song (Sung) China

The Art of Landscape

The Chan Artists

4. Early Renaissance

Northern Europe

Claus Sluter

Art of the Court

The Limbourg Brothers

Jan van Eyck

Art of Salvation

Rogier van der Weyden

Flanders: Sacred and Secular

The Ghent Altarpiece

The Art of Dying Well

Hieronymus Bosch

Mathis Neithart

Art and the Reformation: Nuremburg and Dürer

Albrecht Dürer

Early Printmaking

Holbein and the English Court

Central Italy: Siena and Florence

Siena

Palazzo Pubblico

Florence: Cathedral Projects

The Baptistery Doors

Lorenzo Ghiberti

Brunelleschi's Dome

Sculpture in Florence

The Or San Michele

Donatello

The Medici and San Lorenzo

Civic Religious Narrative

Masaccio

The Gates of Paradise

The Tomb of Leonardo Bruni

Medici Dominance

Sandro Botticelli

Mantua and the Gonzagas

Andrea Mantegna

Papal Court in Rome

5. Later Renaissance in Italy

Rome Revived and Florence

Michelangelo: David

Leonardo da Vinci

"Renaissance Man"

Raphael: The Florentine Influence

The New St. Peter's

Bramante

Raphael at the Vatican

The School of Athens

The Parnassus

The Disputa

Michelangelo: The Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo: The Julius Tomb

The Last Judgment and the New Spirituality

The Medici Tombs

Cellini and Virtuoso Artistry

Portraiture

Venetian Variations

Dürer

Giovanni Bellini

Titian: Narrative and Color

Mythology and Landscape

Titian: Mythologies for Ferrara

Titian: Imperial Patronage

Philip II of Spain

Palladian Villas

Paolo Veronese

Palladio's "Christian Temple"

Jacopo Tintoretto

View from Outside

Aztecs, Ancient Mexico

The Temple Stone

Teotihuacan

View from Outside

Ife and Benin, Ancient West Africa

Brass Heads

The Art of Benin

Bronze Plaques

Bronze Heads

The Palace at Benin

6. Age of Absolutism

Catholic Europe

Caravaggio and Carracci

The Cerasi Chapel

Religious Heroism: Gentileschi

Rubens

Spanish Oppression

A Royal Commission

Van Dyck

Church Militant: Bernini

St. Peter's

Bernini and the Sun King

French Classicism

Poussin

The Palace of Versailles

Painted Magnificence: Würzburg

Neumann

Tiepolo

Capitalism and Calvinism: Holland

Bruegel

Civic Portraiture: Rembrandt

Self-Portraits

Rembrandt and Religion

Church Interiors

Scenic Vistas

Van Ruisdael

Vermeer

Domestic Scenes

Steen

Emmanuel de Witte

Still-life Painting

View from Outside

Imperial Islam--Isfahan and India

Islamic Architecture in Persia

Illuminated Manuscripts in Persia

Persian Miniatures

Mughal Art and Architecture

Fatehpur Sikri

7. Dawn of the Modern Era

Age of Enlightenment

Hogarth

Portraiture and Landscape

The Classical Heritage

Syon House

The Royal Academy

Joshua Reynolds

Angelica Kauffmann

Benjamin West

Art and Revolution

Houdon

Thomas Jefferson and the Architecture of the New Nation

Neoclassicism in France

Canova

David and History Painting

Images of Napoleon

Rebellion and History

Goya

Goya and the Disasters of War

Turner: Nature's Grandeur and Empire's Demise

Turner and Modernity

Constable and Rural England

The Romantic Landscape in Germany: Friedrich

The Gothic Revival and Other Historicisms

Schinkel

Pugin

Orientalism in France

Eugène Delacroix

8. Nature and Novelty

Paris: Modern City

Paris Opera

Iron Architecture

Daumier

Rural Realism: Courbet

"The Painter of Modern Life": Manet

Capturing the Impression: Monet

Morisot

Impressionists at Argenteuil

City Boulevards

Photography: Pencil of Nature

View from Outside

Chicago, America, and Americans Abroad

Landscape

Bierstadt

American Photographers

Americans in Europe

Whistler

Japonisme

Cassatt

Rebuilding Chicago

The Marshall Field Store

Sullivan

Domestic Architecture: Wright

Sense and Sensibilities

Seurat

Cezanne

Emotion Through Form: Van Gogh

Escape to the Primitive: Gauguin

The Sculpture of Rodin

The Balzac Monument

Edward Steichen

Art Nouveau

Victor Horta

Josef Hoffmann: The Palais Stoclet

9. In Search of Modernity

Endless Experiment--Paris

Cubism

Collage

"Luxury, Calm, and Voluptuousness": Matisse

Sculpture as Form: Brancusi

The Search for a Pure Geometry

Mondrian

Le Corbusier

The Villa Savoye

View from Outside

Modernizing America--New York Circles

Stieglitz and Gallery '291'

Marsden Hartley

Georgia O'Keeffe

Edward Weston

Critique of Unreason: Germany and World War I

Expressionism

Munich

Schiele

Kandinsky and the "Blue Rider"

The Impact of War: Beckmann

Art and Anti-Art: Dadaism

The Bauhaus

Mies van der Rohe

Paul Klee

View from Outside

Revolutionary Russia, 1917

Art as "Agitprop"

El Lissitzky

Liubov Popova

Problems in Paris

De Chirico

Duchamp

Duchamp's Large Glass

Surrealist Art

Joan Miro

Alexander Calder

Picasso: Variations

Minotauromachy

Picasso: Guernica

Expressionist Imagery

View from Outside

Modern Mexico

Jose Clemente Orozco

Diego Rivera

The History and Future of Mexico

Frida Kahlo

View from Outside

Modern Nigeria (Yoruba), West Africa

The Doorpost

Yoruba Community Life

10. World War II to Present

Sublime and Secular: New York

The New York School

Barnett Newman

Mark Rothko

Arshile Gorky

Jackson Pollock

Drip Paintings

The "Rothko Chapel"

The Abstract in Sculpture

Seymour Lipton

Purity in Architecture: Mies van der Rohe

"Post-Painterly Abstraction"

Frank Stella

Analytical Paradoxes: Jasper Johns

Robert Rauschenberg

Pop Art

Roy Lichtenstein

Claes Oldenburg

Andy Warhol

After Modernism

Art in Action: Beuys

Eva Hesse

Environmental Art

Edward Kienholz

African-American Artworks

Political Art

Anselm Kiefer

Hans Haacke

Feminist Art

Barbara Kruger

Audrey Flack

Return to Representation

David Hockney

Jennifer Bartlett

American Archetype: Guston

New Directions

Monumental Art

Modern to Postmodern in Architecture: The New Museum

The Pompidou Center

The Kimbell Museum

Stuttgart Staatsgalerie

Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery

Postmodernism

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

Author Biography: Dr. Larry Silver, president of the College Art Association, teaches art history at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. he lives in Evanston.

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