Art & Max
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Art & Max

4.1 8
by David Wiesner
     
 

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Max and Arthur are friends who share an interest in painting. Arthur is an accomplished painter; Max is a beginner. Max’s first attempt at using a paintbrush sends the two friends on a whirlwind trip through various artistic media, which turn out to have unexpected pitfalls. Although Max is inexperienced, he’s courageous—and a quick learner. His

Overview

Max and Arthur are friends who share an interest in painting. Arthur is an accomplished painter; Max is a beginner. Max’s first attempt at using a paintbrush sends the two friends on a whirlwind trip through various artistic media, which turn out to have unexpected pitfalls. Although Max is inexperienced, he’s courageous—and a quick learner. His energy and enthusiasm bring the adventure to its triumphant conclusion. Beginners everywhere will take heart.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Three-time Caldecott winner Wiesner (Flotsam) introduces a desert lizard named Art, a self-important portrait painter who undergoes a metamorphosis, inside and out, when his pesky lizard friend, Max, decides he wants to paint, too. "What should I paint?" asks Max; the narcissistic Art says, "Well... you could paint me." Literal-minded Max begins applying blue to Art's knobbly skin. A series of philosophical questions arises: is Art still Art when his painted coat bursts off him mid-tantrum, like a reptilian sun gone nova? Is he still Art when Max douses him with water and the remaining color drains right out of him, rendering him transparent? Is he still Art when his outline collapses into a pile of tangled wire? As Max attempts to reconstruct his friend, an early effort has Art resembling a preschooler's spiky drawing of a monster ("More detail, I think," Art says drily). This small-scale and surprisingly comedic story takes place against a placid backdrop of pale desert colors, which recedes to keep the focus squarely on the dynamic between the two lizards and the wide range of emotions that Wiesner masterfully evokes. Ages 5–8. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

"A thought-provoking exploration of the creative process....Funny, clever, full of revelations to those who look carefully—this title represents picture-book making at its best."—School Library Journal, starred review

"Children will giggle and marvel....Triple Caldecott winner Wiesner delivers a wildly trippy, funny and original interpretation of the artistic process."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"This small-scale and surprisingly comedic story takes place against a placid backdrop of pale desert colors, which recedes to keep the focus squarely on the dynamic between the two lizards and the wide range of emotions that Wiesner masterfully evokes."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Sophisticated and playful, this beautiful mind-stretcher invites viewers to think about art's fundamentals: line, color, shape, and imaginative freedom."—Booklist, starred review

"[A] visual meditation on the effects of illustrative style. . . . Detailed with Wiesner's signature craft and wit."—The Horn Book

"Longtime children's book legend David Wiesner takes exciting risks with his newest book about two art-making critters."—The Huffington Post

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Impetuous young Max, an anthropomorphic frog- or lizard-like creature is impressed by the painting of larger, lizard-like Arthur. The artist sneers at Max's insistence that he can paint too, but finally agrees to let him. "What should I paint?" Max asks. When told he could paint Arthur, Max proceeds to paint him, literally, all over. Efforts to clean Arthur result in more serious problems, including elimination of all color, leaving only a jumble of lines. Max manages to put these into an outline of Arthur. Blasting colors at him then results in a pointillist Arthur. Other creatures act as an audience for Max's struggles in these double-page reviews of contemporary art styles from Calder to Pollock. In the end, Max and Arthur are painting away together in the desert setting. Wiesner uses acrylic, pastel, watercolor, and india ink to create his detailed, naturalistic, humorous illustrations for this surreal adventure. Be sure to lift the jacket to see the contrasting cover beneath. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4—Underlying this tale of a feisty friendship between two lizards is a thought-provoking exploration of the creative process. Readers first encounter Arthur rendering a formal portrait of a stately reptile, one of several reacting to the unfolding drama in the desert. Frenetic Max dashes into the scene; he also wants to paint, but lacks ideas. Self-assured Art suggests, "Well…you could paint me." Max's literal response yields a more colorful Art, but the master's outrage causes his acrylic armor to shatter. His texture falls in fragments, leaving an undercoating of dusty pastels vulnerable to passing breezes. Each of Max's attempts to solve Art's problems leads to unexpected outcomes, until his mentor is reduced to an inked outline, one that ultimately unravels. Wiesner deftly uses panels and full spreads to take Max from his "aha" moment through the humorous and uncertain moments of reconstructing Art. Differentiated fonts clarify who's speaking the snippets of dialogue. Wielding a vacuum cleaner that soaks up the ruined scales, Max sprays a colorful stream, à la Jackson Pollock, that lands, surprisingly, in a Pointillist manner on the amazed lizard. The conclusion reveals that his fresh look inspires the senior artist with new vision, too. Funny, clever, full of revelations to those who look carefully—this title represents picture-book making at its best. Wiesner's inventive story will generate conversations about media, style, and, of course, "What Is Art?" It will resonate with children who live in a world in which actions are deemed mistakes or marvels, depending on who's judging.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library
Kirkus Reviews

"The book is extremely well organised and all the case studies...are interesting and well written. [It] provides a well-rounded synopsis to anyone interested in international environmental politics...It succeeds [in making the text accessible to students] quite elegantly." - International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics.

"This is an excellent comparison of major international environmental regimes that captures many of the lessons of the study of international environmental politics over the last 40 years. It is a splendid resource for teaching and for researchers...Buy it. Read it. Assign it." - Professor Peter Haas, UMASS Amherst, USA.

"[This book] provides a well-rounded synopsis to anyone interested in international environmental politics. The editors make it clear from the outset that their primary audience is students... That said, this book will nevertheless appeal to academics, researchers and policy-makers wishing to expand their horizons and learn more about environmental regimes that are often, though wrongly, treated as peripheral..." -Stavros Aflonis (2012).

"This text gives an easily comprehensible introduction to international environmental agreements. [It] is a vital contribution to our understanding of the politics associated with establishing international environmental consensus" - International Law Reporter

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618756636
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/04/2010
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
171,342
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
BR (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A thought-provoking exploration of the creative process....Funny, clever, full of revelations to those who look carefully—this title represents picture-book making at its best."—School Library Journal, starred review

"Children will giggle and marvel....Triple Caldecott winner Wiesner delivers a wildly trippy, funny and original interpretation of the artistic process."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"This small-scale and surprisingly comedic story takes place against a placid backdrop of pale desert colors, which recedes to keep the focus squarely on the dynamic between the two lizards and the wide range of emotions that Wiesner masterfully evokes."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Sophisticated and playful, this beautiful mind-stretcher invites viewers to think about art's fundamentals: line, color, shape, and imaginative freedom."—Booklist starred review

"[A] visual meditation on the effects of illustrative style. . . . Detailed with Wiesner's signature craft and wit."—The Horn Book

"Longtime children's book legend David Wiesner takes exciting risks with his newest book about two art-making critters."—The Huffington Post

Meet the Author


David Wiesner has won the Caldecott Medal three times—for Tuesday, The Three Pigs, and Flotsam—the second person in history to do so. He is also the recipient of two Caldecott Honors, for Free Fall and Mr. Wuffles. Internationally renowned for his visual storytelling, David has brought his artistry and his fascination with undersea life to a new genre, the graphic novel. He lives near Philadelphia with his family.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Outside Philadelphia, P.A.
Date of Birth:
February 5, 1956
Place of Birth:
Bridgewater, NJ
Education:
Rhode Island School of Design -- BFA in Illustration.
Website:
http://www.hmhbooks.com/wiesner/

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Art & Max 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
wisecat More than 1 year ago
I bought this book because my 2 1/2 year old is named Max. And it turned out to be one of my best book purchases for him. He LOVES it! He has me read it to him 3-4 times a night. And then he'll just look through it over and over again asking questions. He can not get enough. And I love it because of the art. It's beautifully done!
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