The Art of Happiness

The Art of Happiness

4.3 82
by Dalai Lama, Howard C. Cutler
     
 

ISBN-10: 1573221112

ISBN-13: 9781573221115

Pub. Date: 10/28/1998

Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated

Nearly every time you see him, he's laughing, or at least smiling. And he makes everyone else around him feel like smiling. He's the Dalai Lama, the spiritual and temporal leader of Tibet, a Nobel Prize winner, and an increasingly popular speaker and statesman. What's more, he'll tell you that happiness is the purpose of life, and that "the very motion of our life is…  See more details below

Overview

Nearly every time you see him, he's laughing, or at least smiling. And he makes everyone else around him feel like smiling. He's the Dalai Lama, the spiritual and temporal leader of Tibet, a Nobel Prize winner, and an increasingly popular speaker and statesman. What's more, he'll tell you that happiness is the purpose of life, and that "the very motion of our life is towards happiness." How to get there has always been the question. He's tried to answer it before, but he's never had the help of a psychiatrist to get the message across in a context we can easily understand. Through conversations, stories, and meditations, the Dalai Lama shows us how to defeat day-to-day anxiety, insecurity, anger, and discouragement. Together with Dr. Cutler, he explores many facets of everyday life, including relationships, loss, and the pursuit of wealth, to illustrate how to ride through life's obstacles on a deep and abiding source of inner peace.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781573221115
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
10/28/1998
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
8.56(w) x 5.86(h) x 1.08(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Author's Note
Introduction1
Pt. IThe Purpose of Life11
Ch. 1The Right to Happiness13
Ch. 2The Sources of Happiness19
Ch. 3Training the Mind for Happiness37
Ch. 4Reclaiming Our Innate State of Happiness52
Pt. IIHuman Warmth and Compassion65
Ch. 5A New Model for Intimacy67
Ch. 6Deepening Our Connection to Others85
Ch. 7The Value and Benefits of Compassion113
Pt. IIITransforming Suffering131
Ch. 8Facing Suffering133
Ch. 9Self-Created Suffering149
Ch. 10Shifting Perspective172
Ch. 11Finding Meaning in Pain and Suffering199
Pt. IVOvercoming Obstacles217
Ch. 12Bringing About Change219
Ch. 13Dealing with Anger and Hatred246
Ch. 14Dealing with Anxiety and Building Self-Esteem263
Pt. VClosing Reflections on Living a Spiritual Life291
Ch. 15Basic Spiritual Values293
Acknowledgments317
Selected titles by His Holiness the Dalai Lama321

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The Art of Happiness 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 91 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is suppose to represent the Dalai Lama's views on happiness. Readers should know right off the bat that the Dalai Lama didn't actually write this book. Rather, the book is written by a Western psychiatrist who has had extensive converations with His Holiness. To insure that there were no "inadvertant distortions" of the Dalai Lama's ideas as a result of the editorial process, the Dalai Lama's interpreter reviewed the final manuscript. You be the judge as to whether that means this there was nothing "lost in translation".

So who is this Dalai Lama, aka "His Holiness" anyway? And, why should we read a book about happiness by him? Well, the Dalai Lama is the spiritual and political leader of the Tibetan people according to Tibetan Buddhism- which in my book makes him a person I'd want to listen to when he talks, especially when it's on one of my favorite subjects, happiness. And if this all sounds like an interesting topic for a book, you should read it- you won't be disappointed.

Now this is the kind of book I could write a long review of- simply because there's just so much wisdom packed into it. But, I think I'll take a short-cut with this one and just hit the highlights.

The Dalai Lama believes that the very purpose of our life is to seek happiness. Other happiness books have also taken this same position. For example, the book "Finding Happiness in a Frustrating World" refers to happiness as "the ultimate pursuit". On this most will agree, but what exactly does the Dalai Lama tell us about finding it?

As with most of his ideas on things, the concept is clear and simple: happiness can be achieved through training the mind. According to the Dalai Lama, one begins by identifying those factors which lead to happiness, and those factors which lead to suffering.

Having done this, one then sets about gradually eliminating those factors which lead to suffering and cultivating those which lead to happiness. That is the way.

To that end, that's exactly what makes up the majority of this book's pages- ways to eliminate factors in your life that lead to suffering, and learning to foster those factors that lead to happiness. Some specific topics include:

-facing suffering
-dealing with anger, hatred, and anxiety
-building self-esteem
-deepening your connection to others

When all is said and done, I'd have to say that the time you spend mulling over the book's 300-plus pages is going to be well worth it. For most readers, the Dalai Lama's wisdom and views will probably be very beneficial, if not transforming. Happy trails!
dfluyau More than 1 year ago
Read it, please.Life is worth living.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great ways to to view the negative parts of life and turn them into a positive! Definitely helps change the way I look at life. Great to know that there is another way of life & internal happiness is achievable!
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