BN.com Gift Guide

The Art of Interactive Design

( 3 )

Overview

An understanding of what makes things interactive is key to the successful creation of websites, computer games, and software. In The Art of Interactive Design, Chris Crawford explains what interactivity is, how it works, why it's important, and how to design good software and websites that are truly interactive. Crawford's colloquial, conversational style makes it easy to grasp the fundamentals and the theoretical underpinnings of interactivity, as he discusses specific social ...

See more details below
Paperback
$22.26
BN.com price
(Save 25%)$29.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $14.28   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

An understanding of what makes things interactive is key to the successful creation of websites, computer games, and software. In The Art of Interactive Design, Chris Crawford explains what interactivity is, how it works, why it's important, and how to design good software and websites that are truly interactive. Crawford's colloquial, conversational style makes it easy to grasp the fundamentals and the theoretical underpinnings of interactivity, as he discusses specific social and artistic issues.

A nontechnical book on the theory of interactivity design, this guide has clear examples and applications that explain what interactivity is, how it works, why it's important and how to design good software.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
What makes contemporary computers and the Web different from previous media? Interactivity. Why does so much of today’s computing and web experience stink? Lousy interactivity. And what can you do about it, as a software developer, designer, or web professional? For starters, read Chris Crawford’s provocative book The Art of Interactive Design.

Crawford’s been thinking about these issues for decades, first as a game designer (his classic The Art of Computer Game Design was first published in 1982). This book integrates his best thinking into a unified set of rules and guidelines for effective interactive design.

Effective interactive design, Crawford says, begins by defining the “verbs”: the actions you want users to be able to perform. (Should a word processor allow users to stain their printouts with virtual tears?) Amongst Crawford’s several other guidelines: Don’t let technology drive your design; create systems that “listen” as well as they “talk,” ruthlessly controlling response time; don’t set up unrealistic expectations your software can’t meet; and don’t describe problems -- offer solutions.

Crawford illuminates each principle with examples of how to do it right -- and wrong. He skewers bad interactive design wherever he finds it, which is almost everywhere. (His multiple-page attack on Adobe Acrobat would be right at home in a comedy club.) Some of the examples are a bit old, but it always helps to be reminded -- especially since the Web gives us all new opportunities to make old mistakes over again. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781886411845
  • Publisher: No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
  • Publication date: 12/15/2002
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 7.36 (w) x 9.44 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Chris Crawford is the "grand old man" of computing game design. He sold his first computer game in 1978, joined Atari in 1979, and led Games Research there. During his time at Atari, he wrote the first edition of "The Art of Computer Game Design" (Osborne, 1984), which has now become a classic in the field. After Atari collapsed in 1984, Chris became a freelance computer game designer. All in all, Chris has 14 published computer games to his credit—all of which he designed and programmed himself. He founded, edited, and wrote most of "The Journal of Computer Game Design," the first periodical devoted to game design. He founded and led the Computer Game Developers' Conference (now the Game Developers' Conference) in its early years. Chris has lectured on game design at conferences and universities all over the world. For the last ten years, he has been developing technology for interactive storytelling.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2004

    Verbose

    An amusing book. Perhaps Crawford's most striking suggestion is that a project should be headed by a designer who has an arts background and who is also able to program. To him, this is an ideal, which may take the field decades to achieve. I am dubious as to how necessary this is, in the first place. He claims that it is easier to find someone from the arts and have her learn the rudiments of programming, than vice versa. But in a specialised environment, like engineering, science or education, it may be better for her to hail from that field, so that she can better know what users might want. Granted, though, for a mass market audience, a more general background might be better. When it comes to specific suggestions regarding the design of a program, he has good ideas. Like using progress bars if a task takes longer than ten seconds. Or using first or second person active voice, rather than a third person passive. These do increase the interactivity. The book is somewhat verbose. He writes at length to illustrate his points. But a little brevity may have been possible, without losing any clarity.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2003

    A classic book on the theory of interactivity.

    There are lots of book on how to program or use this bit of software or another, but this book teaches fundemental problems that most authors do not even think about. Some of it seems common sense, until you notice how many websites and programs violate his points and suffer for it. Many of his arguments reason thru problems I have never seen considered in other books. He talks about language and procol design, metaphors for algorithms, adaptable anthopormorphization, ui design in programs, webpages and interactive fiction. However if you already own his 'Understanding Interactivity', (the earlier version of this book) I do not feel that there is enough difference to make buying this one worthwhile.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)