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The Art of Rhetoric

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Overview

Few, if any, writers in history have made major contributions to as many fields of knowledge as Aristotle...

'If there are two definitive features of ancient Greek civilization,' writes Hugh Lawson-Tancred in his wide-ranging Introduction, 'they are articulacy and competition.' In the city-states oratorical competence was an essential asset for politicians in the Assemblies and Councils and even for ordinary citizens in the courts of law. In response, the technique of rhetoric rapidly developed, bringing virtuoso...

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Overview

Few, if any, writers in history have made major contributions to as many fields of knowledge as Aristotle...

'If there are two definitive features of ancient Greek civilization,' writes Hugh Lawson-Tancred in his wide-ranging Introduction, 'they are articulacy and competition.' In the city-states oratorical competence was an essential asset for politicians in the Assemblies and Councils and even for ordinary citizens in the courts of law. In response, the technique of rhetoric rapidly developed, bringing virtuoso performances and a host of practical manuals for the layman. Yet if many of these were little more than collections of debaters' tricks, the hugely influential Art of Rhetoric has a far deeper purpose. It is here that Aristotle 384-322 B.C. establishes the methods of informal reasoning, provides the first aesthetic evaluation of prose style and offers detailed observations on character and the emotions. 'Persuasiveness,' suggests Lawson-Tancred, 'becomes for the first time a systematic and even scientific exercise; it can indeed be taught, but only by a deep grasp of some of the most central features of human nature.' His fine translation makes freshly available an epoch-making work of literary criticism.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140445107
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/1992
  • Series: Penguin Classics Series
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 214,074
  • Product dimensions: 5.21 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.73 (d)

Meet the Author

Aristotle was born at Stageira, in the dominion of the kings of Macedonia, in 384 BC. For twenty years he studied at Athens in the Academy of Plato, on whose death in 347 he left, and, some time later, became tutor of the young Alexander the Great. When Alexander succeeded to the throne of Macedonia in 335, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his school and research institute, the Lyceum, to which his great erudition attracted a large number of scholars. After Alexander's death in 323, anti-Macedonian feeling drove Aristotle out of Athens, and he fled to Chalcis in Euboea, where he died in 322. His writings, which were of extraordinary range, profoundly affected the whole course of ancient and medieval philosophy, and they are still eagerly studied and debated by philosophers today. Very many of them have survived and among the most famous are the Ethics and the Politics.

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Table of Contents

Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Hugh Lawson-Tancred

Preface
Introduction:
1. The Importance of Ancient Rhetoric
2. The Historical Background to the Rhetoric
3. Rhetoric as Techne
4. Psychology in the Rhetoric
5. Style and Composition
6. The Rhetorical Legacy of Aristotle
7. The Translation

THE ART OF RHETORIC Section One: Introductory
Chapter 1.1. The Nature of Rhetoric
PART ONE: DEMONSTRATION Section Two: The Genres of Oratory
Chapter 1.2. The Definition of Rhetoric
Chapter 1.3. The Genres
Section Three: Deliberation
Chapter 1.4. The Province of Deliberation
Chapter 1.5. Happiness
Chapter 1.6. The Good and the Expedient
Chapter 1.7. Relative Expediency
Chapter 1.8. Constitutions
Section Four: Display
Chapter 1.9. Display Oratory
Section Five: Litigation
Chapter 1.10. Injustice
Chapter 1.11. Pleasure
Chapter 1.12. The Criminal Mind
Chapter 1.13. Crime and Punishment
Chapter 1.14. Relatively Serious Crimes
Chapter 1.15. Non-technical Proofs
PART TWO: EMOTION AND CHARACTER Section Six: Emotion
Chapter 2.1. The Role of Emotion and Character
Chapter 2.2. Anger
Chapter 2.3. Calm
Chapter 2.4. Friendship and Enmity
Chapter 2.5. Fear and Confidence
Chapter 2.6. Shame
Chapter 2.7. Favour
Chapter 2.8. Pity
Chapter 2.9. Indignation
Chapter 2.10. Envy
Chapter 2.11. Jealousy
Section Seven: Character
Chapter 2.12. Youth
Chapter 2.13. Old Age
Chapter 2.14. Prime
Chapter 2.15. Birth
Chapter 2.16. Wealth
Chapter 2.17. Power
PART THREE: UNIVERSAL ASPECTS Section Eight: Common Topics
Chapter 2.18. The Role of Common Topics
Chapter 2.19. The Topics of Possibility
Chapter 2.20. Example
Chapter 2.21. Maxim
Chapter 2.22. Enthymeme
Chapter 2.23. Demonstrative Common Topics
Chapter 2.24. Illusory Topics
Chapter 2.25. Refutation
Chapter 2.26. Amplification
Section Nine: Style
Chapter 3.1. Historical Preliminary
Chapter 3.2. Clarity
Chapter 3.3. Frigidity
Chapter 3.4. Simile
Chapter 3.5. Purity
Chapter 3.6. Amplitude
Chapter 3.7. Propriety
Chapter 3.8. Rhythm
Chapter 3.9. Syntax
Chapter 3.10. Wit and Metaphor
Chapter 3.11. Vividness
Chapter 3.12. Suitability to Genre
Section Ten: Composition
Chapter 3.13. Narration and Proof
Chapter 3.14. The Introduction
Chapter 3.15. Prejudice
Chapter 3.16. Narration
Chapter 3.17. Proof and Refutation
Chapter 3.18. Altercation
Chapter 3.19. The Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2014

    Tyler

    "How do you heal posionius scars that when i turn 15 they will kill me"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2014

    Conn

    Yaw

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2014

    Ry

    That's an excellent question, Merida! When monsters die they usually leave behind a pile of dust or ashes. But sometimes they drop limbs, armor, clothing or some other armament. This is know as Spoils of War.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2014

    Riley

    WHAT????

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2014

    Jamie

    He sat up straight in his chair. He quickly took his daggers before Mr.nico entered.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2014

    Merida

    How about we start off with why monsters turn to dust when killed?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2014

    Joey-Mr.Nico

    He walked in calmly, carrying a blue note book, ringed. "This work? Got a sketch book to, for diagrams. " he walked back to his seat, up front, and sat, slipping his satchel over his chair.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2014

    Aom P Uasonp Jason

    Hey

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2014

    Monster Studies Class

    Only enter on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2014

    Mason

    Bangs hammer on a spear to change it.

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    Posted September 3, 2014

    Tyler

    She walks in then starts making about 25 arrows. Then walks back to result 1.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    Be careful, the ebook is a different version than paperback!

    Be careful, the ebook is a different version than paperback!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2003

    Core Work in Understanding Aristotle

    In a sense, one begins at the beginning of the collected works of Aristotle. However, another fine place to begin is with The Art of Rhetoric. This is partly true because this work explains how Aristotle himself makes his arguments. Reading this work is an intellectual adventure.

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    Posted September 27, 2011

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    Posted January 17, 2012

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