The Art of Software Testing

The Art of Software Testing

by Glenford J. Myers, Corey Sandler, Tom Badgett
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Although the hardware and software of computing has changed markedly in the three decades since the first editionof The Art of Software Testing, this book's powerful underlying analysis has stood the test of time. Most books on software testing target particular development techniques, languages, or testing methods, and enjoy a short shelf life. In contrast, The

See more details below

Overview

Although the hardware and software of computing has changed markedly in the three decades since the first editionof The Art of Software Testing, this book's powerful underlying analysis has stood the test of time. Most books on software testing target particular development techniques, languages, or testing methods, and enjoy a short shelf life. In contrast, The Art of Software Testing, Third Edition provides a concise, but powerful and comprehensive presentation of time-proven software testing approaches. If your software development project is mission critical, this book is an investment in your organization's future.

For the professional programmer, IT project manager, or programming or computer science student, the new Third Edition explains how to apply classic principles to the computer industry's most pressing issues, including: Testing apps for iPhones, iPads, Black–Berrys, Androids, and other mobile devicesNoncomputer-based code walk-throughs or inspections (discussed from a technical, how-to-find-errors point of view)Usability testing (which has becomeeven more critical with the advent of increasingly complex software writtenfor a broad audience)Executing collaborative (user) programming and testingTesting for Internet applications, e-commerce, and agile programming environments

Whether you're a student looking for a testing guide you'll use for the rest of your career or an IT manager overseeing a software development team, The Art of Software Testing, Third Edition is a classic work, critical to your success and the success of your project.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This theoretical discussion of the purpose and nature of software testing emphasizes methodologies for the design of effective test cases. It comprehensively covers psychological and economic principles, managerial aspects of testing, test tools, high-order testing, code inspections, and debugging. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118031964
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/08/2011
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Art of Software Testing


By Glenford J. Myers Corey Sandler Tom Badgett Todd M. Thomas

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-471-46912-2


Chapter One

A Self-Assessment Test

Since this book was first published 25 years ago, software testing has become both easier and more difficult than ever.

Software testing is more difficult because of the vast array of programming languages, operating systems, and hardware platforms that have evolved. And, while relatively few people used computers in the 1970s, today virtually anyone in business or education could hardly complete a day's work without using a computer. Furthermore, the machines themselves are hundreds of times more powerful than those early devices.

Therefore, the software we write today potentially touches millions of people, enabling them to do their jobs effectively and efficiently-or causing them untold frustration and the cost of lost work or lost business. This is not to say that software is more important today than it was when the first edition of this book was published, but it is safe to say that computers-and the software that drives them-certainly affect more people and more businesses today.

Software testing is easier, in some ways, because the array of software and operating systems is much more sophisticated than ever, providing intrinsic well-tested routines that can be incorporated into applications without the need for a programmer to develop them from scratch. Graphical user interfaces (GUIs), forexample, can be built from a development language's libraries, and, since they are preprogrammed objects that have been debugged and tested previously, the need for testing them as part of a custom application is much reduced.

Software testing is a process, or a series of processes, designed to make sure computer code does what it was designed to do and that it does not do anything unintended. Software should be predictable and consistent, offering no surprises to users. In this book we will look at many approaches to achieving this goal.

Now, before we start the book, we'd like you to take a short exam.

We want you to write a set of test cases-specific sets of data-to properly test a relatively simple program. Create a set of test data for the program-data the program must handle correctly to be considered a successful program. Here's a description of the program:

The program reads three integer values from an input dialog. The three values represent the lengths of the sides of a triangle. The program displays a message that states whether the triangle is scalene, isosceles, or equilateral.

Remember that a scalene triangle is one where no two sides are equal, whereas an isosceles triangle has two equal sides, and an equilateral triangle has three sides of equal length. Moreover, the angles opposite the equal sides in an isosceles triangle also are equal (it also follows that the sides opposite equal angles in a triangle are equal), and all angles in an equilateral triangle are equal.

Evaluate your set of test cases by using it to answer the following questions. Give yourself one point for each "yes" answer.

1. Do you have a test case that represents a valid scalene triangle? (Note that test cases such as 1,2,3 and 2,5,10 do not warrant a "yes" answer because there does not exist a triangle having these dimensions.)

2. Do you have a test case that represents a valid equilateral triangle?

3. Do you have a test case that represents a valid isosceles triangle? (Note that a test case representing 2,2,4 would not count because it is not a valid triangle.)

4. Do you have at least three test cases that represent valid isosceles triangles such that you have tried all three permutations of two equal sides (such as, 3,3,4; 3,4,3; and 4,3,3)?

5. Do you have a test case in which one side has a zero value?

6. Do you have a test case in which one side has a negative value?

7. Do you have a test case with three integers greater than zero such that the sum of two of the numbers is equal to the third? (That is, if the program said that 1,2,3 represents a scalene triangle, it would contain a bug.)

8. Do you have at least three test cases in category 7 such that you have tried all three permutations where the length of one side is equal to the sum of the lengths of the other two sides (for example, 1,2,3; 1,3,2; and 3,1,2)?

9. Do you have a test case with three integers greater than zero such that the sum of two of the numbers is less than the third (such as 1,2,4 or 12,15,30)?

10. Do you have at least three test cases in category 9 such that you have tried all three permutations (for example, 1,2,4; 1,4,2; and 4,1,2)?

11. Do you have a test case in which all sides are zero (0,0,0)? 12. Do you have at least one test case specifying noninteger values (such as 2.5,3.5,5.5)?

13. Do you have at least one test case specifying the wrong number of values (two rather than three integers, for example)?

14. For each test case did you specify the expected output from the program in addition to the input values?

Of course, a set of test cases that satisfies these conditions does not guarantee that all possible errors would be found, but since questions 1 through 13 represent errors that actually have occurred in different versions of this program, an adequate test of this program should expose at least these errors.

Now, before you become concerned about your own score, consider this: In our experience, highly qualified professional programmers score, on the average, only 7.8 out of a possible 14. If you've done better, congratulations; if not, we'll try to help.

The point of the exercise is to illustrate that the testing of even a trivial program such as this is not an easy task. And if this is true, consider the difficulty of testing a 100,000-statement air traffic control system, a compiler, or even a mundane payroll program. Testing also becomes more difficult with the object-oriented languages such as Java and C++. For example, your test cases for applications built with these languages must expose errors associated with object instantiation and memory management.

It might seem, from working with this example, that thoroughly testing a complex, real-world program would be impossible. Not so! Although the task can be daunting, adequate program testing is a very necessary-and achievable-part of software development, as you will learn in this book.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The Art of Software Testing by Glenford J. Myers Corey Sandler Tom Badgett Todd M. Thomas Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >