Art of the Chicken Coop: A Fun and Essential Guide to Housing Your Peeps

Art of the Chicken Coop: A Fun and Essential Guide to Housing Your Peeps

by Chris Gleason
     
 

Keeping chickens-even for city dwellers is a trend that just keeps on growing. With this book, today's modern farmer will find plans and construction techniques for making seven different chicken coops, along with interesting chicken facts and recipes for eggs. Experienced farmer, woodworker, and author Chris Gleason's hip eye for design, combined with sound… See more details below

Overview

Keeping chickens-even for city dwellers is a trend that just keeps on growing. With this book, today's modern farmer will find plans and construction techniques for making seven different chicken coops, along with interesting chicken facts and recipes for eggs. Experienced farmer, woodworker, and author Chris Gleason's hip eye for design, combined with sound woodworking techniques make the coops both attractive and sturdy. Practical information such as how to properly size a coop and how to source reclaimed materials is included. Don't miss the authors "tour de coop" where he visits coops from other backyard farmers to find out why they keep chickens and what lessons they have to share with others interested in doing so.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Ever since we bought our first house I've been wanting to convert a portion of our backyard into a food source of sorts. A small garden and perhaps a chicken run would be ideal. The gardening idea hasn't made it farther than a few herbs and tomato plants but we're in the process of redoing our backyard's landscape. In the meantime I've been reading a book here and there about keeping chickens and realized there's no way I can pull it off. LOL

That said, I loved this book! Not only is it inventive and inspired, but Gleason's approach is very Earth-friendly. One of the things I expected to see was all new supplies and instead the reader is encouraged to reuse old doors or scraps of wood when possible. As someone who values reusing and repurposing when possible I was really happy to see several of the coops had been made using repurposed materials. The designs themselves are each charming and adaptable. Designed for different sized flocks and with different features for both the keeper and the hens' convenience I would honestly love to build any of these if I was sure I could make it worth my efforts. Additionally this book is peppered with cool information about chicken breeds, history and recipes featuring eggs.

As a whole I would recommend this book to an experienced chicken keeper looking for some nice design plans for a new coop. I also think it's a great inspiration for a new keeper, or-as in my case-someone considering keeping chickens. Maybe this would even make a neat gift for someone who just adores chicken paraphenalia.

The Book:

Chickens need a coop, and what better way to show your love than building one? In The Art of the Chicken Coop, seven unique coops are presented with detailed building instructions, along with an additional gallery for more inspiration for your ideal coop. With additional information from other chicken owners, the lessons to creating a place for your chickens starts here.

The Yarn:

When I saw this book sitting in the NetGalley listings, I knew I had to scoop it up. I dream about having chickens one day, and the idea of being able to construct my own coop seems daunting. Gleason's book helps to show anyone how to create sturdy coops from materials people may already have or can acquire easily. Chris Gleason is a known DIY author on woodworking who deals with recycled materials, but the materials lists presented for each coop are clearly able to be gleaned from any large store you can buy construction materials. Bright, colorful, step-by-step photos along the way assist in making sure that the instructions can be followed as much visually as in print.

I liked the additional information such as how to build chicken runs (attached to the coops or not) or how to resize the coops based on a standard 2sf (square feet) per additional bird. Little informational bits such as chicken breeds and recipes are scattered throughout the book. At the end are three profiles of "chicken keepers", who outline why they keep chickens and how. All three are based in Salt Lake City, Utah, which while showing that even urban backyard areas can support raising chickens, they don't quite give as diverse a look at urban poultry keeping as I would like to see.

The Art of the Chicken Coop is not as expansive a collection of construction plans as probably exists in other titles on the market. However the vivid photographs, construction techniques and focus on reused materials make this good for those looking for a budget-conscious DIY book.

Cute Coop Ideas!

I've had backyard chickens for two years now. I love my chickens and as I'd like to have more in the next few years, researching coop ideas has become a hobby for me. I was very happy to be able to review this book.

Art of the Chicken Coop by Chris Gleason, has seven different coop ideas. Four of them are for flocks of six chicken or less, which is a great size for a back yard flock. We get on average five eggs per week from each of our chickens, which has given us more then enough for our family, as well as some to share.

If you are planning on keep more chickens, three of the coop designs are for larger coops, if you'd like to have twelve to fifteen chickens. Also included are some guidelines on how to increase the size of any coops in the book. There's even instructions for a coop made out of salvaged materials.

This is also a great book for the beginning chicken owner, because not only are there coop designs but there are a lot of chicken keeping tips through out the book and explanations for what you need to have in your coop and why.

The book includes a completely supply list, step-by-step pictures - which I love - and some great egg recipes as well. There is also a section on the popular backyard breeds with pictures and a bit on info on each.

The only thing I didn't like about the book was that it called for chicken wire in the coops. From my research I have learned that you need to use hardwear cloth in your coop building as the holes in chicken wire are too big, and raccoons and other predators can get through it. Also I would have loved more then one movable coop idea. Other then that, I thought this book was just great.

I do not have much building experience but I would feel confident trying to build any of the coops in this book. Recommended!

We've had backyard chickens for two years now. It's been so wonderful to have pastured, organic eggs, right from our own backyard. I love my chickens and as I'd like to have more in the next few years, researching coop ideas has become a hobby for me. I was very happy to be able to review this book.

Art of the Chicken Coop by Chris Gleason has seven different coop ideas. Four of them are for flocks of six chickens or less, which is a great size for a back yard flock. We get on average five eggs per week from each of our chickens; this gives us enough for our family, as well as some to share occasionally.

If you are planning on keep more chickens, three of the coop designs are for larger coops, if you'd like to have twelve to fifteen chickens. Also included are some guidelines on how to increase the size of any coops in the book. There's even instructions for a coop made out of salvaged materials.

This is also a great book for the beginning chicken owner, because not only are there coop designs but there are a lot of chicken keeping tips through out the book and explanations for what you need to have in your coop and why.

The book includes a completely supply list, step-by-step pictures - which I love - and some great egg recipes as well. There is also a section on the popular backyard breeds with pictures and a bit on info on each.

The only thing I didn't like about the book was that it called for chicken wire in the coops. From my research I have learned that you need to use hardware cloth in your coop building as the holes in chicken wire are too big, and raccoons and other predators can get through it. Also I would have loved more then one movable coop idea. Other then that, I thought this book was just great.

I do not have much building experience but I would feel confident trying to build any of the coops in this book. Recommended!

More and more people are discovering the joy of gardening in their back yards. Even in a small yard, You can find enough space to enjoy fresh vegetables. Just one tomatoe plant can provide fresh tomatoes all summer long. Well now with the help of this book, you can add the joy of having fresh eggs to your table. I used to raise chickens and I loved having fresh eggs. They seem to taste so much better than store bought. Besides, you know what goes into their production and your chickens are not suffering in cramped, crude living conditions as most of the chickens producing store bought eggs are. Another positive thing about backyard chicken coops are the benefits of fertilizer for your garden. You no longer have to throw away those left overs bevcause chickens will eat just about anything you give them. But, they really love fresh vegetables and fruits. You can feed them the peels and pits. Also, Chris suggests using salvaged goods for building uour coop. You can find salved wood from construction and demolition sites.

This book by Chris Gleason has really sparked a new interest in chickens for me. Now, if I can just talk my husband into it. I am contemplating just sticking to a few of the bantam chickens. When I had chickens, I loved the Old English Bantams, the Frizzle's (these were the best momma's and the sweetest birds), I also had a few of the rumpless Aracauna chickens that lay green eggs.

Not only does the book provide wonderful ideas for coops, runs and nest boxes, but it also provides the materials needed for each project and step by step instructions. Most of the steps have color photographs to go along with the directions. Also icluded int the book are several recipes for using the eggs. One of the suggestion that I believes is one of the best things ever, is for making a hand sanitizer holder that is attached to the door of the coop. This is such a simple thing, and yet so smart. This makes it easy to have clean hands before touching your birds as well as clean hands before going back in your house.

This colorful guide to chicken coop construction provides step-by-step instructions for building artistic yet practical small scale housing for chickens. The volume provides plans for seven coops of varying shapes and sizes and includes three case studies of urban chicken owners and their egg-producing pets. Additional sections provide information of building runs and a collection of photographs of other coop styles and designs. Gleason is a professional coop builder and the author of several other do-it-yourself titles.

Coop-a-doodle-do! The first step in the increasingly popular hobby of raising chickens is to provide your birds a home. "Art of the Chicken Coop" provides detailed instructions for building seven functional, cool-looking coops that range in style from rustic to Victorian and accommodate flocks from six birds to 15. Tossed in you'll find handy tips for keeping chickens, delicious egg recipes from around the world, and profiles of three modern homesteaders who offer advice on living the chicken-keeping life.

The Art of the Chicken Coop is of course the more practical of the two, but it's by no means a dry, technical, how-to construction guide. Seven coops are described with instructive drawings and material lists, and the construction process is also profusely illustrated with excellent color photos.

Most of the coops are pretty artsy -designed more for the owners and neighbors than for the chickens, who probably won't even notice that their home looks like a gypsy caravan or a miniature barn. If you fancy a coop decorated with stars and sunrise overlays, this book is for you.

But it's not totally about construction, or coops. Actually, it's like those coop tours that have become so popular: you visit several people who love and raise chickens, see what they have done to house their birds in creative as well as practical ways, and chat about cock-a-doodle-do-dom in general.

Gorgeous chicken coops

Sure, you could probably raise chickens in a wooden box, but with this do-it-yourself guide to coop construction, you won't have to. Art of the Chicken Coop: a Fun and Essential Guide to Housing Your Peeps by Utah native Chris Gleason lays out plans and step-by-step instructions for seven different coops, including one from salvaged parts.

"Art of the Chicken Coop" by Chris Gleason. What came first, the chicken or the egg? Thanks to this book, you're about to learn the correct answer to this age-old question - neither. The coop came first. So, if you're planning on keeping chickens, whether it's just a few or a large flock, you'll need a place to house your egg-laying friends. In this book, today's modern farmer - both urban and suburban - will find creative plans and easy-to-follow construction techniques for making seven stylish chicken coops.

Named a 2011 Best Book in Do-It-Yourself from Library Journal.
Got an urban flock? Craft some stylish housing for your backyard chickens with this specialized construction guide. Included are seven coop designs, with great instructions and clear illustrations for each step.

Part 1: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00m1q5l
Part 2: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p001v6c0

One of the biggest expenses when you decide to start keeping chickens is that of the housing. Your chickens may be relatively cheap, but if you're looking to buy a coop you can expect to pay anything from a hundred to several hundred pounds. It can be eye watering, and makes a lie of the 'cheap supply of eggs' waffle spouted by enthusiasts like me. So if you're in any way handy, building your own hen accommodation can be a much more viable alternative. Chris Gleason's 'Art Of The Chicken Coop' attempts to offer some inspiration.
Packed full of photographs and detailed instructions, this book is a pleasant browse. In fact, it's down right pretty. My son has spent many a bedtime cooing over the pictures. Make no mistake, though, this isn't for the novice. I am what could charitably be called incompetent with a tool kit, so as I read through the detailed instructions and material lists I had a sense of encroaching doom. Plus, I never have the competent DIYers stock of scraps of wood, wire or cabinet doors. Try as I might, I doubt I'd ever be able to make the gypsy caravan coop. In fact, I know I couldn't. However, if you do know your way around a tape measure you could make yourself a little masterpiece. Even though I'm useless, however, I suspect that some of these designs would need some slight adaptations for the inclement British weather. Gleason makes his coops in Utah.

There are seven coop designs looked at in depth, and then several more design tweaks at the back. Most of the differences are purely aesthetic, but I imagine that most people would be able to find something here that could be adapted to their own set ups.The coops are adaptable to your flock size, which is a nice touch, and we're introduced to three keepers and their home made housing. Chicken keepers are a nosey lot, by and large, and we do like to see how other people keep their poultry. I know a fair few back yard chicken keepers at this stage, but none of them have such wonderfully decorated coops. These are brightly coloured and elaborately decorated and therefore instantly appealing to the pet keeper who just wants a few eggs. They also have the benefit of looking attractive in the garden which is a concern for the average suburban or urban enthusiast. Neighbours are more likely to complain if your garden looks like Steptoes yard. Although I can imagine many a serious poultryman losing his eyebrows in his hairline at the idea of adding wooden stars and individually cut shingles to his poultry shed.
But Chris Gleason hasn't written a book for the serious poultryman. He has written a book for the DIY capable novice. He has included a brief profile of some of the most popular chicken breeds, and some basic care instructions. Touchingly, there are also some basic egg recipes scattered through out the book for when your new flock decides to deliver. The whole thing reads like a gentle coax in to the world of chicken keeping, and an attempt to seduce the would-be carpenter in to using his or her imagination. It's certainly a breath of fresh air from the 'just convert a shed' mantra.

My advice? If you're reading this because you really, really want chickens but your other half is reluctant, BUT likes building things, buy them this book. It might just entice them to flex their creative muscle in order to show off, and while you're enthusiastically praising their efforts you can sneak a few hens in around the back. It's a win-win situation.

Starred Review: Many are seeing the benefits of urban farming and with chickens the small livestock of choice, there are a growing number of titles on the topic. This slim book focuses on housing. Gleason included a chicken coop design in his Backyard Projects for Today?s Homestead, but the seven hip coop designs here are new and fresh. Colorful, attractive illustrations display the stages of construction. The guide is well organized and features helpful tips from other city flock owners. This delightful little book is highly recommended, especially in areas with urban flocks.

If you have an eye for something a bit off the beaten path and are looking for plans to build your own chicken coop, this book was written with you in mind.

Author Chris Gleason, also an experienced chicken keeper and woodworker, has provided the plans for seven unique coop designs.

Each set of plans includes photos of the finished coop, a pencil sketch, materials list, and step by step instructions.

This has got to be my favorite one... A movable chicken gypsy caravan coop !

The author includes practical information such as what size coop you need, and how to find materials that can be re-purposed. Also included are short profiles of several backyard chicken keepers from around the country with photos of their coops and some words of wisdom from each of them. There are even a few egg recipes included.

Really a fun read with some very unique coop designs. The only downside would be choosing which coop to build

It's no longer enough to simply provide a secure shelter for your brood. Chicken coops are an art form! From chicken condos to chicken tractors and all styles in between, you'll find a plan that's just right for your girls in Art of the
Chicken Coop. Offering seven unique coop designs appropriate for both large and small flocks as well as three in-depth profiles of experienced chicken-keepers, this book will provide inspiration galore for sheltering chickens in style. Whether you're preparing for your first clutch of chicks or you're an old pro, you'll find tips,
ideas and advice that you can put to work today.
Each chapter focuses on a different coop design and is complete with plans, materials list, step-by-step instructions and color photos.

Keeping chickens is a trend that just keeps on growing, even for city dwellers. With this book.
today's modern farmer will find plans and construction techniques for making seven different chicken coops, along with interesting chicken facts and recipes for eggs. Experienced farmer, woodworker and author Chris Gleason's hip eye for design, combined with sound woodworking techniques make the coops both attractive and sturdy. Practical information such as how to properly size a coop and how to source reclaimed materials is included. This book offers a whimsical and fresh perspective that reflects today's backyard farmer.

In Art of the Chicken Coop there are easy to follow construction plans for seven different coops, four of them for flocks of six chickens or less. The perfect size for a backyard flock. One coop is a space saver, only using 2 x 3 feet of space! Each coop includes a complete supply list and lots of pictures!

If you will be keeping over six, up to fifteen, three of the coop designs will accommodate such a flock. The author also includes instructions on how to increase the size of any of the coops in the book.

What I really liked was the use of salvaged materials. Both my coops used salvaged materials. I'm sure my new coop will be no different.

There are also 3 profiles of chicken keepers who offer some great advice and tips, a whole chapter on building coop runs, advice on everything you'll need in your coop, a characteristic chart of popular backyard breeds (with each breed pictured), and egg recipes.

From beginner to veteran this book has great information for anyone!

Library Journal
Many are seeing the benefits of urban farming and with chickens the small livestock of choice, there are a growing number of titles on the topic. This slim book focuses on housing. Gleason included a chicken coop design in his Backyard Projects for Today's Homestead, but the seven hip coop designs here are new and fresh. Colorful, attractive illustrations display the stages of construction. The guide is well organized and features helpful tips from other city flock owners. This delightful little book is highly recommended, especially in areas with urban flocks.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565235427
Publisher:
Fox Chapel Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/01/2011
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
1,374,394
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

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