The Art of the Moving Picture [NOOK Book]

Overview

"In the field of film aesthetics, it is the first important American work, still important--The Art of the Moving Picture is astonishing."
--Stanley Kauffmann

Written in 1915, The Art of the Moving Picture by poet Vachel Lindsay is the first book to treat movies as art. Lindsay writes a brilliant analysis of the early silent films (including several now lost films). He is extraordinarily prescient about the future of moviemaking--particularly about the business, the prominence of technology, and the emergence of...
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The Art of the Moving Picture

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Overview

"In the field of film aesthetics, it is the first important American work, still important--The Art of the Moving Picture is astonishing."
--Stanley Kauffmann

Written in 1915, The Art of the Moving Picture by poet Vachel Lindsay is the first book to treat movies as art. Lindsay writes a brilliant analysis of the early silent films (including several now lost films). He is extraordinarily prescient about the future of moviemaking--particularly about the business, the prominence of technology, and the emergence of the director as the author of the film.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307769657
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/15/2010
  • Series: Modern Library Movies
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Vachel Lindsay (1879-1931) studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago and then in New York with Robert Henri before becoming a poet. He was a member of the Modernist School (others included Ezra Pound,e. e. cummings, and Wallace Stevens) and published over a dozen collections of poetry.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Read an Excerpt

INTRODUCTION

by Stanley Kauffmann


"This is a joyous and wonderful performance," said Francis Hackett when he reviewed this book in the New Republic of December 25, 1915. He then went on to call it "a bold and brilliant theory, really bold and really brilliant, and takes first place as an interpretation of the greatest popular aesthetic phenomenon in the world."

Hackett was certainly not alone in praising the book. Gordon Craig, the great man of the theater whom Lindsay urges to enter films, wrote to the author from-Rome suggesting that they found a film studio together. D.W. Griffith was moved to ask Lindsay to be his guest at the New York premiere of Intolerance. Victor 0. Freeburg, who taught what surely must have been one of the first college film courses-at the School of journalism of Columbia University-used the book as a text. Herbert Croly, the editor of the New Republic, invited Lindsay to be the magazine's film critic. (Lindsay wrote occasional reviews during 1917.) Comment on the book was wide and intense.

But it has virtually disappeared. Although most film historians know the book, very few contemporary film enthusiasts, in my experience, are even aware of its existence. It has been out of print for many years. The revised edition of 1922, reprinted here, is scarcer than the original of 1915. Lindsay's biographers pay it scant attention. Edgar Lee Masters, who published a biography of Lindsay in 1935, disparages The Art of the Moving Picture. Eleanor Ruggles, who published a biography in 1959, does not deal with it in any significant way. Yet, out of the mass of Lindsay's poetry and prose, this may be the work most worthy of survival. And in the field of film aesthetics, it is the first important American work, still important.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Table of Contents

Introduction to Modern Library: The Movies v
Introduction vii
A Word from the Director of the Denver Art Association xxi
Book I The General Photoplay Situation in America, January 1, 1922, Especially as Viewed from the Heights of the Civic Centre at Denver, Colorado, and the Denver Art Museum, Which Is to Be a Leading Feature of This Civic Centre 1
Book II The Outline Which Has Been Accepted as the Basis of Photoplay Criticism in America, Both in the Studios of the Los Angeles Region, and All the Serious Criticism Which Has Appeared in the Daily Press and the Magazines 19
I. The Point of View 21
II. The Photoplay of Action 25
III. The Intimate Photoplay 30
IV. The Motion Picture of Fairy Splendor 38
V. The Picture of Crowd Splendor 43
VI. The Picture of Patriotic Splendor 50
VII. The Picture of Religious Splendor 59
VIII. Sculpture-in-Motion 65
IX. Painting-in-Motion 75
X. Furniture, Trappings, and Inventions in Motion 84
XI. Architecture-in-Motion 95
XII. Thirty Differences between the Photoplays and the Stage 105
XIII. Hieroglyphics 116
Book III More Personal Speculations and Afterthoughts not Brought Forward so Dogmatically 127
XIV. The Orchestra, Conversation, and the Censorship 129
XV. The Substitute for the Saloon 139
XVI. California and America 145
XVII. Progress and Endowment 150
XVIII. Architects as Crusaders 161
XIX. On Coming Forth by Day 166
XX. The Prophet-Wizard 171
XXI. The Acceptable Year of the Lord 180
Appendix 189
Index 195
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    Posted January 29, 2013

    Its ok

    Fine get it

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