The Art of the Moving Picture

The Art of the Moving Picture

5.0 3
by Vachel Lindsay
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"In the field of film aesthetics, it is the first important American work, still important--The Art of the Moving Picture is astonishing."
--Stanley Kauffmann

Written in 1915, The Art of the Moving Picture by poet Vachel Lindsay is the first book to treat movies as art. Lindsay writes a brilliant analysis of the early silent films (including

Overview

"In the field of film aesthetics, it is the first important American work, still important--The Art of the Moving Picture is astonishing."
--Stanley Kauffmann

Written in 1915, The Art of the Moving Picture by poet Vachel Lindsay is the first book to treat movies as art. Lindsay writes a brilliant analysis of the early silent films (including several now lost films). He is extraordinarily prescient about the future of moviemaking--particularly about the business, the prominence of technology, and the emergence of the director as the author of the film.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307769657
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/15/2010
Series:
Modern Library Movies
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
232
File size:
2 MB

Read an Excerpt

INTRODUCTION

by Stanley Kauffmann


"This is a joyous and wonderful performance," said Francis Hackett when he reviewed this book in the New Republic of December 25, 1915. He then went on to call it "a bold and brilliant theory, really bold and really brilliant, and takes first place as an interpretation of the greatest popular aesthetic phenomenon in the world."

Hackett was certainly not alone in praising the book. Gordon Craig, the great man of the theater whom Lindsay urges to enter films, wrote to the author from-Rome suggesting that they found a film studio together. D.W. Griffith was moved to ask Lindsay to be his guest at the New York premiere of Intolerance. Victor 0. Freeburg, who taught what surely must have been one of the first college film courses-at the School of journalism of Columbia University-used the book as a text. Herbert Croly, the editor of the New Republic, invited Lindsay to be the magazine's film critic. (Lindsay wrote occasional reviews during 1917.) Comment on the book was wide and intense.

But it has virtually disappeared. Although most film historians know the book, very few contemporary film enthusiasts, in my experience, are even aware of its existence. It has been out of print for many years. The revised edition of 1922, reprinted here, is scarcer than the original of 1915. Lindsay's biographers pay it scant attention. Edgar Lee Masters, who published a biography of Lindsay in 1935, disparages The Art of the Moving Picture. Eleanor Ruggles, who published a biography in 1959, does not deal with it in any significant way. Yet, out of the mass of Lindsay's poetry and prose, this may be the work most worthy of survival. And in the field of film aesthetics, it is the first important American work, still important.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Meet the Author

Vachel Lindsay (1879-1931) studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago and then in New York with Robert Henri before becoming a poet. He was a member of the Modernist School (others included Ezra Pound,e. e. cummings, and Wallace Stevens) and published over a dozen collections of poetry.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Art of the Moving Picture 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ddddddddddduuuuuuuuuuuudddddddddddddeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fine get it