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Art of Travel
     

Art of Travel

by Francis Galton
 

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To those who meditate Travel.--Qualifications for a Traveller.--If you have health, a great craving for adventure, at least a moderate fortune, and can set your heart on a definite object, which old travellers do not think impracticable, then--travel by all means. If, in addition to these qualifications, you have scientific taste and knowledge, I believe that no

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To those who meditate Travel.--Qualifications for a Traveller.--If you have health, a great craving for adventure, at least a moderate fortune, and can set your heart on a definite object, which old travellers do not think impracticable, then--travel by all means. If, in addition to these qualifications, you have scientific taste and knowledge, I believe that no career, in time of peace, can offer to you more advantages than that of a traveller. If you have not independent means, you may still turn travelling to excellent account; for experience shows it often leads to promotion, nay, some men support themselves by travel. They explore pasture land in Australia, they hunt for ivory in Africa, they collect specimens of natural history for sale, or they wander as artists.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590480526
Publisher:
The Long Riders' Guild
Publication date:
10/28/2001
Pages:
380
Product dimensions:
5.06(w) x 8.04(h) x 0.92(d)

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made of thick blanket, and called " Blanket Wrappers," are in use at Hudson's Bay instead of shoes. Shirt sleeves.—When you have occasion to tuck up your shirt sleeves, recollect that the way of doing so is not to begin by turning the cuffs inside out, but outside in—the sleeves must be rolled up inwards, towards the arm, and not the reverse way. In the one cases the sleeves will remain tucked up for hours without being touched; in the other, they become loose every five minutes. § 2. Personal Cleanliness.—There is no denying the fact, though it be not agreeable to confess it, that dirt and grease are great protectors of the skin against inclement weather, and that therefore the leader of a party should not be too exacting about the appearance of his less-warmly clad followers. Daily washing, if not followed by oiling, must be compensated for by wearing clothes. Take the instance of a dog. He will sleep out under any bush, and thrive there, so long as he is not washed, groomed, and kept clean; but if he be, he must have a kennel to lie in. A savage will never wash unless he can grease himself afterwards,—grease takes the place of clothing to him. I mentioned previously a Swedish proverb; it would be very true if varied thus, " Grease and dirt are the savage's wearing apparel!" There must be a balance between the activity of the skin and the calls upon it, and where the exposure is greater, there must the pores be more defended. This is a strangely artificial state that we live in, in Europe, where our whole body is swathed up in many folds of dress, excepting the hands and face, the first of which are frequently gloved. We can afford to wash, but naked mencannot. Toilet in travel.—The most convenient time for a traveller to make his own toilet, in rough travel, is after ...

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