Artemisia

Artemisia

3.0 2
by Lillian Belinfante Herzberg
     
 

Both parents tried to hide their disappointment when their firstborn was a girl. From the moment of her unwelcome birth, Artemisia Gentileschi was to experience many rejections in her lifelong struggle for acknowledgment and approval. Orazio, her famous artist father, recognized the promise his oldest child showed which he hoped could be developed into doing what

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Overview

Both parents tried to hide their disappointment when their firstborn was a girl. From the moment of her unwelcome birth, Artemisia Gentileschi was to experience many rejections in her lifelong struggle for acknowledgment and approval. Orazio, her famous artist father, recognized the promise his oldest child showed which he hoped could be developed into doing what he did best, paint. She was not allowed to attend prestigious art institutes because she was a woman. Orazio hired Agostino Tassi to teach Artemisia privately to paint landscapes. Tassi raped her. She went to court and endured torture to prove she was not responsible for enticing Tassi. She moved away from Rome to Florence where she became a friend of Galileo and was commissioned to paint for the Medicis. At the request of Charles I she went to England to paint for his Queen, Henrietta Maria. Upon her death in Naples no mention was made of her great artistic skills.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781424117086
Publisher:
Publish America
Publication date:
06/19/2006
Pages:
126
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.30(d)

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Artemisia 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
shelfortruth More than 1 year ago
I expected a real biography of this amazing artist, Artemisia: with bibliography, complex and interesting narrative, notes, index, etc. But, alas I got the very wrong book. Instead of a serious biography, I got this mushy, sentimental fictional story about Artimisia. Even this could be good, potentially. However Lillian Belinfante Herzberg is a poor writer with poor imagination and vocabulary. Here is a taste of her writing. This is a rape scene: "When she started to cry out, 'Don't hurt me. Please don't hurt me.' he (sic) grabbed his handkerchief from his sleeve and crammed it into her mouth. He kissed her stomach, her privates, then he caressed her body with his juicy tongue, creeping down, down, down, until he found the real object of his passion. When he had satisfied himself he brought his mouth up to her mouth and plunged into Artemisia with a final grunt, and collapsed on the frightened girl." Oh, what a lovely rape! What a glorified rape! She does not object at all as his "juicy" (must be tasty, no?) tongue caressed (does a tongue caress? Rather strange) her "ripe" body. I suppose he did take his handkerchief out of her mouth before he kissed her. This writing is not only poor in so many of its aspects, but prurient and even sleazy. Poor Artemisia! And to think that this kind of narcissistic book costs more than $20 is simply outrageous. shelfortruth
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ms Herzberg has written a real page turner in 'Artemisia, An Outrageous Woman' , a biography of a little known artist of the 17th century. The author has the uncanny ability to transport the reader, not only to that time period, but into each episode. The reader feels as though he is either participating in the scene or in some cases viewing it as a voyeur. Herzberg puts you right into the mind of Artemisia as well as the other characters. The book provides great insight into the difficulties women had in becoming educated, gaining recognition and maintaining their honor and self esteem during that time period. Artemisia is a must read!